• KrisMyStar

    Pshhhh it’s Jay Chou people! Let him say what he wants!

    • http://twitter.com/JM7228JW J-May 제메이©

       HAHA! IKR!! he’s awesome even with all his scandals~~~ :P

  • http://twitter.com/sujumyeolchi strawberry myeolchi

    This all seemed pretty legit except for one pretty dumb statement, which you later seemed to contradict yourself.

    ” Plus, he’s accomplished what many in K-pop have yet to do – break into the Chinese market. In fact, he created the market.”  Not only does the second sentence prove why the first makes no sense, but what is remotely surprising about that? Of course a Taiwanese person had an easier time breaking into the Chinese market… and later you say

    “He is to Chinese pop music what SNSD, Super Junior, and Big Bang is to K-pop, combined!”
    Impressive and probably true, but reinforces the idea that comparing him in the Chinese market to Korean stars makes absolutely no sense.

    Maybe I’m misinterpreting what you’re trying to say?  Was it just like, “this is why he matters in China, even if you guys as K-pop fans don’t think his opinion matters”? 

    • dothrakiwomanwarrior

      My thoughts exactly. A pretty good article, but how is that even remotely relevant?

  • http://twitter.com/LulcKathy kat

    Am I the only one who finds group dancing to Gangnam Style at “Global Chinese Music Awards” to be quite absurd? I mean jeez you are supposably celebrating cpop’s global popularity but then all of a sudden you start dancing to Korean music. I totally understand why Show Luo decided not to dance.
    I don’t know how big kpop is in China (even though I’m Chinese and love kpop), but the value of cpop can’t be replaced kpop.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LL4QDJLVFDT2RDIZYBALSE75JE angel29

    I missed the point on why there is a need to defend his statement. (But thank you for writing about Jay Chou. He is one of Asia’s best artists EVER!)

  • UncleFan

    I’m grateful to the author for introducing me to Jay Chou, because even though I recognize his name, I didn’t really know anything about him. However, I have to say I’m pretty skeptical about the prospects of this “China Wind”. I’ve checked out some Chinese pop recently on YouTube and found the product severely lacking compared to K-Pop. Hopefully the Chinese will put some effort into making their music more accessible to international fans, because I’m sure they have no shortage of talent.

    • jkjkjkjklololol

      tbh, the quality of jay chou’s songs have been in decline in the past couple of years. his earlier stuff are better. 

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/RAKBAYRY7PL7FMS7AXFWAF53GM trang

        It is true that his recent works are not as innovative and addictive as his first few albums, however, compared to the bunch of other Chinese and Korean artists, his work is still very authentic and distinguished. He still produced plenty of beautiful songs with the usage of different kind of instruments and  Western and Eastern infused style of music.

        His work is much better than those Korean catchy songs with non sense lyrics like T-ara’s Yayaya or heavy auto-tune usage. Kpop is just a trend, it may slowdown very soon as the recent released songs are similar and lack of creativeness.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/AOXLECX3QN3FLT4RKCCHUAJ4ZE amy

      this is by no means an attack on you, but why should chinese people try to make their music “more accessible to international fans”? they don’t need to, china, taiwan, and hong kong combined are huge enough markets that they don’t need international fans. they’ve never shown any sign of wanting to promote their music outside of the chinese speaking community.

      • takasar1

        “china, taiwan, and hong kong combined”. you forgot to add Singapore, Malaysia, Macau, Thailand, Indonesia. all have significant manadarin speaking populations.

        agree with what you said though

      • UncleFan

        As eternalstars inferred above, my comment is a reaction to the idea I got from the article that the China Wind is the Chinese equivalent of the Hallyu Wave. If you read the article again, you may see why I got this impression.

        Having said that, I would be willing to bet that Chinese pop stars would LOVE to export their art to a larger, international audience.

    • eternalstars

      The thing is, from what I know, “China Wind” refers to a musical style that Jay Chou especially likes to use, and doesn’t have anything to do with the act of breaking into international markets like the term “Hallyu Wave” suggests. So really, chinese pop artists don’t have any obligation to make their music “more accessible” internationally since they’ve never had the inclination to do so in the first place. Kpop has expressed their interest to promote outside of Korea, and that’s definitely shown in their music, but Chinese pop is very much directed at and meant for Chinese speakers. 

  • leadaegyu

    I think Chou’s rage on GS and K-pop is understandable since nowadays Asian music is heavily influenced by K-pop. I live in Taiwan and i personally think that K-pop is really big, if you walk over the street like Ximending (Taipei’s Harajuku) you can hear that mostly K-pop songs are played in the stores. I even heard a lot of Korean songs remake by other singers, they just changed the lyrics into Chinese. And since I’m Indonesian I’ve also witnessed the sudden growth of boy and girl groups debuting in my country, but the quality isn’t on par with the original one I admit. You can check out a boy group called S4, their MV styling, song, everything is totally K-pop and they even collaborated with Hyuna! And I’ve also heard that they’ll be receiving training in Korea. I myself as an ordinary K-pop fan feel a lot of distress with the heavy influence what about Jay Chou as a Chinese music pioneer?

    • Almira Agathas

      Oh man, Indonesian boy/girl bands are super crap. I never bothered watching them.
      Greetings from Indonesia pal

      • leadaegyu

        yeah, watching them just make me want to throw my laptop out the window lol. for once i want them to appreciate their own music, not just copying the trends outside. i know we have a lot of great musicians so i’m kinda jealous of how’s jay is so vocal about the hallyu wave and defending chinese music…

      • leadaegyu

        yeah, watching them just make me want to throw my laptop out the window lol. for once i want them to appreciate their own music, not just copying the trends outside. i know we have a lot of great musicians so i’m kinda jealous of how’s jay is so vocal about the hallyu wave and defending chinese music…

        • http://twitter.com/Ariel_886 Ariel Amarixeon

           oh I’m with you, everytime i see indonesian boyband or girlband, i really want to hang my self lol.
          but thanks god, we still have Judika, Tompi, Rosa and Noah ^__^,etc.
          but i have soft sport for JKT48 ^__^ oh wait they are not kpop they are jpop.
          Greeting from another Indonesian reader.

        • cowchieyux

          I think in a way that’s what jay chou is afraid of you know.. That soon the mando industry that he’s so familiar and influential in will go down a foreign path and try too hard to follow another countries trend in an effort to get the same amount of popularity. He is really just advocating fans to continue to follow domestic artists as kpop as garned a huge fanbase in china and for other artists to stay rooted to their original chinese style instead of trying to become something that they aren’t. Or will never be as good at. In a way the chinese are lucky that they have such an influential person standing up for their own original music and refusing to fall under the rising dominance of hallyu. 
          I understand mandarin and i honestly didn’t pick up on him belittling kpop or the korean culture. In fact he stated that hallyu is very strong and great but he believes that mandarin music is pretty great too. That’s what he said and now everyone is going on about how he’s jealous and rude to kpop and so arrogant and stuff. Jay chou is jay chou, he’s always been like this. But there is no denying his influence and as such a dynamic artist that isn’t similar to any kpop act he is in a good place to point that out to the rest of china and the mandarin speaking music industry. People will listen to him and it also reminds everyone to stay true and pride in their own music rather than bending down for someone elses. I’m sure korea is proud of their own music and how wide spread  it  has become, take the countless documentaries about the spread of hallyu and how idols are praised for spreading the sound of korea. but taken from another countries perspective it is rather hard. Jay is proud of chinese music and he is kinda like sm saying that they are very proud of hallyu and its greatness. Korea thinks kpop is great and strong , thats evident. Well jay chou is saying that he believes mandarin music is strong and great too. I have personally seen kpop artists talk about how they will work hard to promote the sound of korea and the greatness of hallyu and its huge spread. Sure they don’t tell people to stop doing something. But jay linked gangnam style with what kpop is today. He didn’t single out the song or psy. Everyone at the chinese award show, top chinese singers were shamelessly and carelessly dancing to g.s a song straight from korea. At an award show celebrating chinese music they chose to promote a korean song and it didn’t occur to anyone that they should do something about it. Well it occurred to jay. And i don’t see anything wrong with it. Its like back in 2010 if they opened mama awards with baby. I’m sure a lot of artists and fans wouldn’t be very happy about it Especially if they take a lot of pride in their own country’s music. 
          Also i think the abs and blonde hair kinda of suit the idea of combining western or trendy music with traditional chinese music. He has this popstar look (that kpop does not own) but sings beautiful poem like ballads. Its quite refreshing. And i would much rather new up-coming chinese singers to follow in his footsteps than that of kpop idol groups.
          This was a brilliant article i honestly thought!
          (Sorry I this is such a long reply, i do agree with what you said,, and then it kinda just elaborated into my take on the whole thing) 

  • animefreakhq

    I’ve witness Korean artist rage in a sense of ethnic pride, so I don’t see anything wrong with this, since it is being said in a china.

  • http://twitter.com/M_Wys Michaela Wylie

    I also agree with what he said. He has a valid point. Korean acts, as we know, go to other countries to earn revenue that they can’t in Korea. That’s all fine…but countries already have their own music and industries. They want to make sure those stay in tact.

  • http://twitter.com/Plutonium22 Plutonium

    I don’t think he has much to worry. Kpop is on the decline already. KPOP has always been just a fad.

  • jkjkjkjklololol

    “Vincent Fang, has been known to produce lyrics in the form of classical Chinese poetry.” 

    i don’t think vincent fang writes classical lyrics. they are by no means colloquial and in many cases very poetic, but certainly not “in the form of classical Chinese poetry.”

    ” he’s created what is known as the “China Wind,” a term much like “Hallyu” in that it describes the current wave of Chinese pop music that has swept not only China and Taiwan, but has also found a measured level of success throughout Asia, putting it in direct competition with K-pop.”

    I believe “China Wind” characterizes the sound of the music rather than a trend, like Hallyu.

    • eternalstars

      “I believe “China Wind” characterizes the sound of the music rather than a trend, like Hallyu.”

      Mhm, agreed.

  • k_db

    Gangnam Style was never truly part of the kpop boom.  It was growing (and receding) on an independent timeline from kpop.  In fact, I honestly haven’t seen sparked interest in K-pop thanks to GS aside those random kpop articles that list Psy, another YG artist, an SM artist, and a lesser known company artist.  However those types of articles happened all the time before GS.

    I personally do not live in Asia and maybe the association between GS and Kpop is/was stronger, but here in “The West,” GS has done nothing for kpop.  ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.  Sure I understand Jay Chou’s point of view, but it still comes off as xenophobic.

    • http://twitter.com/SJZGloria SJZGloria

      xenophobic? Jay’s word is to promote support for cpop, its not like he’s asking for the government to ban kpop. While Korea had laws preventing foreigners from appearing on too many public programs just a few years ago…

    • http://twitter.com/SJZGloria SJZGloria

      xenophobic? Jay’s word is to promote support for cpop, its not like he’s asking for the government to ban kpop. While Korea had laws preventing foreigners from appearing on too many public programs just a few years ago…

      • k_db

        He’s basically saying. “Don’t do the Gangnam Style, it’s not chinese.”  Sure his wording is a bit more careful.

        and have I ever said Korea isn’t xenophobic?  The East in general is extremely xenophobic and even if they’re all equally xenophobic, that doesn’t mean none of them are xenophobic.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/RAKBAYRY7PL7FMS7AXFWAF53GM trang

    Jay Chou has been in the music industry for ages, I think more than 10 years now, and they criticized him to copy WooYoung’s style??? Please.. it is ridiculous!!!

    I think he is much more advanced comparing to Kpop and those Korean idol bands. His music is beautiful. I am not Chinese, but I appreciate the melody and the instruments used in his songs. Truly his recent works are not as good as his earlier songs but they are still very distinguished and very Jay Chou.. I love how he has integrated the traditional Chinese music and instruments in his songs which there are not many Korean artists do it (I only can recall a few of earlier SG Wannabe’s songs infused with Korean traditional instruments).

    • http://twitter.com/dal8_ dal8

      I love Jay Chou. I’ve been listening to his songs since his first album. Of course he is very talented, and I admire him as a musician. 

      Having said that, none of those things justifies his close-mindedness against the music in other cultures. Yes he can say whatever he wants to, but “he is right because his music is way better than any K-pop music” argument is not only weak, but also very problematic. 

      What is wrong with his argument, as well as yours, is the strong ethnocentrism. It’s ok to say your own culture is great, but you should not look down on other cultures to say that. 

  • http://twitter.com/juzcheckinout Checkinout

    I just moved to Shanghai this year and to be honest, I see no signs of any Hallyu invasion whatsoever.  I can count with one hand the number of times I’ve heard kpop played in stores. Young people I speak to are a lot more interested in Chinese actors and popstars and look at me blankly when I ask about Korean dramas and music (though a couple did mention that their moms watch k-dramas)… 

    Perhaps kpop is more prevalent in Taiwan and HK, but in mainland China which undoubtedly has the larger population, it wasn’t too long ago when any entertainment apart from the sanctioned ones were prohibited or the population was too poor, busy studying or making money to indulge.  I see way more interest in C-pop (esp from Taiwan/HK) amongst the middle class especially since it is in a language they understand.  Perhaps they will start to venture out of c-pop as time passes, but my guess is it will first start with American/UK pop before moving into Korean.

  • whereex

    Ehh, Jay Chou was composing music when most of these Kpop fans were still in diapers.  He can say what he wants… his fanbase isn’t just a bunch of teen girls screaming “oppa!”

    And to people who keep saying Cpop needs to make itself more international– uh, what?  Between China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia you already have about 1/5th of the world’s population; I’m not sure how much more market you really need.  Also I’m not exactly sure what “making music more international” would entail.  It’s not like international Kpop fans all speak fluent Korean or understand Korean culture.  I feel like people who say they don’t like Chinese music because it’s “not accessible” are in reality just disappointed at the lack of dancing shirtless teenage boys wearing eyeliner, or barely legal girls making cute faces in miniskirts.  To each their own, but don’t try and convince me that it’s the music or culture that’s the problem.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

      Bravo.

    • ExoKpop

      generalization at its finest. 

    • John

      But if you read the article about the positive things artists like Jay Chou has incorporated into their music such as speaking about education and whatnot, maybe it would rub off. So what if kpop fans doesn’t speak fluent korean? Saying that sounds a little ignorant. It’s like saying, “Oh if you can’t pass or do well in school, you might as well join the army.”

      Kids could benefit from this and it could even push them with a sense of self motivation by learning the language and educating themeslves on the culture. I sure as hell would love that rather than listening to Kesha, Lady Gaga, and Justin B over and over again.

      But then again, I don’t blame you. if the China market is not very open I am sure they are not willing to do much international. And btw, this is coming from an American who loves Kpop, Jpop, Cpop,I am also musician.

    • John

      But if you read the article about the positive things artists like Jay Chou has incorporated into their music such as speaking about education and whatnot, maybe it would rub off. So what if kpop fans doesn’t speak fluent korean? Saying that sounds a little ignorant. It’s like saying, “Oh if you can’t pass or do well in school, you might as well join the army.”

      Kids could benefit from this and it could even push them with a sense of self motivation by learning the language and educating themeslves on the culture. I sure as hell would love that rather than listening to Kesha, Lady Gaga, and Justin B over and over again.

      But then again, I don’t blame you. if the China market is not very open I am sure they are not willing to do much international. And btw, this is coming from an American who loves Kpop, Jpop, Cpop,I am also musician.

  • http://twitter.com/sebsobandsky Sabah

    Bizarrely I first saw Jay Chou (love him – confession of bias) in his movie ‘Initial D’ which has a wonderful message about how the best method to better your craft isn’t to beat out the competition but rather to just to better your own past achievements, using them as goal posts. 

    In a way I do understand this fear of Hallyu taking over because of what happened here in England with the manner American entertainment ‘invaded’ television and cinema (AND that was even before cable!) There is a stark difference with countries that proactively protected their local entertainment industries through limiting international imports such as India.  Though things are slowly changing now.  Furthermore I feel that the main issue in England is the lack of funding to create and produce home grown productions so they kind of had to find programmes from somewhere. Although I don’t know for sure, there seems to be a lot more money in the Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Indian markets which the governments tend to protect or have a vested interest in e.g. KBS MBC being government owned. 

    Still, surely Chinese fans have enough love in their hearts (and money in their pockets) to like both Mandarin artists as well as Kpop. There is a fine line between protecting local produce and tribalism or even jingoism WHICH I don’t think Jay Chou crossed with his remarks.  However it would be foolish not to note politics as well as patriotism which more than often become entangled in such competition. 

    I believe that the internet/forums have helped to give Asian music fans a much broader sense of aspects and interests so that they don’t automatically buy into whatever view/mindset their favourite idol is selling.  For instance, I enjoy American entertainment and support it but I am aware of the fact that its success in England has been detrimental, to some extent, to home grown arts. Also just because I like American entertainment it does not necessarily follow that I must like American foreign policy or all things American, no matter how much my favourite American artists try to influence me. There are many factors to be aware of which are  continually changing. 

    Jay Chou (still love him!) has a right to voice his opinion and raise concerns that affect him and his peers AND I don’t feel that his words wandered into any kind of -ism.  So too, do Chinese fans have the right to deliberate over his views and take them or leave them WITHOUT feeling any disloyalty towards Jay Chou or Chinese music industry or even China.

  • http://twitter.com/akikisetsu joy

    I kinda understand where his coming from, but singling out Psy or Gangnam style(on 2 occasions already), is really barking at the wrong tree.  

  • Himei

    Great written article.  That is all.

  • http://logton.tumblr.com/ Jasmin Davis

    Music isn’t a competition to see who can get the most. It’s an art form to be enjoyed or even to send a message. You shouldn’t ‘better’ your music to get more fans than someone else, and you shouldn’t deter the promotion of a song just because it’s not from your country. I understand how influential Jay Chou is, but the remarks he made came off as ignorant, no matter how you interpret it.

  • http://twitter.com/lillian23910 Sharon

    I know Jay Chou, and wow can’t believe he said that. Didn’t he work with Suju M on one of their songs? Ya, I looked it up. Jay Chou composed a song for suju M, it’s called Love is Sweet.I remember being so happy for them because He’s a really big deal in China. I wonder what he thinks of that. Is it okay because it’s in Chinese? 

    Though, I don’t think kpop is all that popular in china. I mean, how many bands promote there? Like two? But I do see that the Chinese groups are definitely inspired by kpop. Maybe that’s what he is referring to? 

  • toshimon

    Another good article. Seoulbeats is in its prime!

  • http://twitter.com/SJZGloria SJZGloria

    I don’t think it should be translated to “Chinese Wind”. Jay’s “Zhong Guo Feng” is similar to what Wang Leehom dubbed as “Chink-Out”, it’s a style of music incorporating traditional Chinese sound and modern westernized sound. It’s not a trend or cultural term, it’s a term used for that particular style of music.

    On another kind of not related but somewhat related note… I feel so bad about the position SM have stuck EXO-M and SJM in! Cpop artists will always seem them as part of kpop, even when they’re trying so hard not to seem like it.

    • whereex

       Yeah I definitely think there’s some confusion with the interpretation of 中国风 as “Chinese Wind.”  It’s actually Chinese style… as in, music that uses traditional Chinese instruments and classical type singing.  I think Jay Chou first started using the term with the song 千里之外 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOd1kFd8vzU) when he collaborated with Fei Yuching.  In interviews he would always talk about Fei Yuching’s voice being the embodiment of 中国风, and how the song had a 中国风 melody… so “Chinese Wind” doesn’t really make sense at all.  风 means wind but it also means style, ie: 风味, 风格, 风行, 风貌.

      tl;dr  I agree; I don’t think there’s such a thing as “Chinese Wind” like the author is saying.  Cpop and Jay Chou don’t care about expanding outside of the Chinese market.  中国风 is talking about Chinese inspired pop music.

      More good 中国风 songs! 

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VduwcTYmEA

      Wang Leehom has some nice stuff too but I can’t think of it at the moment.

  • severely

    I’m impressed by him. There aren’t many pop artists, period, who have managed to stay relevant and incredibly popular for as long as he has.

    And I think he has a right to make a statement about protecting the industry in which he operates. He wasn’t rude, over-the-top, or excessive in his comments. To act otherwise is ridiculous. And especially considering how many international kpop fans come from Western countries that strongly believe in the freedom of speech and bemoan how tightly controlled idols arte… it’s laughable to see them up in arms over someone simply stating his opinion.

  • creeperfangirl123

    It’s always great when artists take pride in their culture but I think refusing another culture is a bit over dramatic. Shouldn’t he be happy that Asian music in general is being recognized in some sort of way globally? No offense, but at least Gangnam Style made a wave in America, if he’s going to talk the talk then walk the walk, make that Chinese wave himself instead of disrespecting the Korean one. I am sure that Jay Chou is an artist with a very respectable career, but no matter how you translate his comment, the general context of it is immature to me. Actually, as an established artist who’s worked so hard in the business I would think that he’d give more props to Psy’s efforts. 

    All I’m saying is that Jay Chou could’ve pushed for the Chinese music industry’s growth without shunning Gangnam Style. 

  • Bstar5

    I honestly don’t get it, music is universal. There was a British Wave that started with the Beatles and wouldn’t have even existed if those British musicians hadn’t been influenced by American Rock & Roll first. They in turn influenced countless musicians in America. This article states that Jay Chou as an artist is producing music that’s a fusion of Western and Chinese music.  He wouldn’t be the artist he is today without be inspired by music that came from music artists outside of China.  I just don’t understand why anyone in China would be afraid of KPop’s influence.  There are only a handful of groups that are doing well there, hardly enough to pose a threat to the Chinese music industry as a whole.

    • destinyanglin

      “This article states that Jay Chou as an artist is producing music that’s a fusion of Western and Chinese music. He wouldn’t be the artist he is today without be inspired by music that came from music artists outside of China.”

      exactly!

    • destinyanglin

      “This article states that Jay Chou as an artist is producing music that’s a fusion of Western and Chinese music. He wouldn’t be the artist he is today without be inspired by music that came from music artists outside of China.”

      exactly!

    • SS501jjang

      “I just don’t understand why anyone in China would be afraid of KPop’s
      influence.  There are only a handful of groups that are doing well
      there, hardly enough to pose a threat to the Chinese music industry as a
      whole.”

      My thoughts exactly.

  • shannie4888

    Jay Chou is entitled to his opinion and we are to ours. Undoubtedly, Psy deserves all of his success with “Gangnam Style.” I understand he needs to protect Chinese identity, but Korea has overcome a lot to transform itself from a 3rd world nation to a developed country today that has a culture, language, music, and television programming that appeals to int’l fans. 

    Whether or not he wants to dance or accept “Gangnam Style,” the fact is that PSY, a portly Asian man has made a name for himself in a hostile Western market where Asians usually don’t stand a chance. He has done it in his own language, on his own terms, and his success speaks volumes about what Korean music can become beyond its borders. Maybe he’ll never have another hit, maybe he will, but Jay Chou, IN MY OPINION, is raining on this man’s parade. He can protect Chinese interests without picking on this song and refusing to dance to “Gangnam Style” by inspiring “Chinese artists [to] focus on bettering their own music to combat the Korean Wave.”

    I like Chinese music. I actually discovered it before Kpop, and there are many talented Chinese artists, but Korea has come into its own and PSY is a small sign of that. Jay is talented, hugely successful, and well-known in the Eastern market. That is HIS accomplishment. “Gangnam Style” has allowed PSY to be successful in the Western market. This is PSY’s accomplishment. He needs to just let the man have his moment. Music is music and people in China are allowed to like what they want.

  • shannie4888

    Jay Chou is entitled to his opinion and we are to ours. Undoubtedly, Psy deserves all of his success with “Gangnam Style.” I understand he needs to protect Chinese identity, but Korea has overcome a lot to transform itself from a 3rd world nation to a developed country today that has a culture, language, music, and television programming that appeals to int’l fans. 

    Whether or not he wants to dance or accept “Gangnam Style,” the fact is that PSY, a portly Asian man has made a name for himself in a hostile Western market where Asians usually don’t stand a chance. He has done it in his own language, on his own terms, and his success speaks volumes about what Korean music can become beyond its borders. Maybe he’ll never have another hit, maybe he will, but Jay Chou, IN MY OPINION, is raining on this man’s parade. He can protect Chinese interests without picking on this song and refusing to dance to “Gangnam Style” by inspiring “Chinese artists [to] focus on bettering their own music to combat the Korean Wave.”

    I like Chinese music. I actually discovered it before Kpop, and there are many talented Chinese artists, but Korea has come into its own and PSY is a small sign of that. Jay is talented, hugely successful, and well-known in the Eastern market. That is HIS accomplishment. “Gangnam Style” has allowed PSY to be successful in the Western market. This is PSY’s accomplishment. He needs to just let the man have his moment. Music is music and people in China are allowed to like what they want.

  • shannie4888

    Jay Chou is entitled to his opinion and we are to ours. Undoubtedly, Psy deserves all of his success with “Gangnam Style.” I understand he needs to protect Chinese identity, but Korea has overcome a lot to transform itself from a 3rd world nation to a developed country today that has a culture, language, music, and television programming that appeals to int’l fans. 

    Whether or not he wants to dance or accept “Gangnam Style,” the fact is that PSY, a portly Asian man has made a name for himself in a hostile Western market where Asians usually don’t stand a chance. He has done it in his own language, on his own terms, and his success speaks volumes about what Korean music can become beyond its borders. Maybe he’ll never have another hit, maybe he will, but Jay Chou, IN MY OPINION, is raining on this man’s parade. He can protect Chinese interests without picking on this song and refusing to dance to “Gangnam Style” by inspiring “Chinese artists [to] focus on bettering their own music to combat the Korean Wave.”

    I like Chinese music. I actually discovered it before Kpop, and there are many talented Chinese artists, but Korea has come into its own and PSY is a small sign of that. Jay is talented, hugely successful, and well-known in the Eastern market. That is HIS accomplishment. “Gangnam Style” has allowed PSY to be successful in the Western market. This is PSY’s accomplishment. He needs to just let the man have his moment. Music is music and people in China are allowed to like what they want.

    • PrincelyLuna

      well said dear! i was (and still am) a fan of Jay Chou before becoming a fan of k-pop too … but i so agree with what you said.

    • whereex

       I have to stop commenting on this topic ahhhhhhh but it’s driving me nuts.

      K so actually what was said (which was hugely blown out of proportion IMO:
      First video:  “Everyone please support Chinese music, not just my music, but support the artists that you like and make sure they can continue into the future, don’t let the Korean wave take over Chinese music.”

      As a note when he says “Chinese Music” he’s not talking about China, he says 华人 which means people of Chinese ancestry.  So, the entire Chinese diaspora’s music.

      Second video:  “I said that point in my speech because I think that right now the Korean Wave is really strong, right?  We don’t want to be overtaken by the Korean Wave, the Korean Wave can stop, everyone needs to unite, we don’t need to do Gangnam Style anymore (laughs).”  Reporter:  “Is there a Jay Chou style going to come out?”  JC: “No no no, Chinese style, everywhere you hear Gangnam style.  Actually, that video is really funny, so we should be stirred up about it.  So when I got my award I thought that my speech was very important, I should tell everyone to continue supporting the artists they love so they can continue into the future, don’t change that.”

      tl;dr
      I don’t think he’s attacking Psy.  Or Korean music really.  I don’t even think he comes off as arrogant like people are saying, and I doubt people who understood the speech would think that either… if anything, it’s more the media’s reaction that’s making this Chinese music vs Korean music.

    • SS501jjang

      Amen.
       

  • samlun100

    I listen to both Chinese and Korean music since long time ago.
    I have to agree with Jay Chou.
    I’m so sick of Gagnam Styles now and feel annoying whenever hearing it.
    I love Jay’s music much more than Psy’s music.

  • sakurahae

    I LOVE chinese music haha~ I started out in jpop, mostly listen to kpop these days, but chinese pop is awesome. The only problem is the lack of fandom resources for non chinese speakers? I have no idea where to go to discover new music or find news or  anything at all……

    • mostdefinitelyincredible

      asianfanatics.net for news and click okn the country you want to follow or you can watch 娱乐百分百 100% Entertainment where artists promote new music.

    • mostdefinitelyincredible

      asianfanatics.net for news and click okn the country you want to follow or you can watch 娱乐百分百 100% Entertainment where artists promote new music.

  • destinyanglin

    I get what he is saying but its just one song.
    Yes I understand that there is probably more of a stronger presence of kpop there than in America but you don’t see american artists saying ‘don’t dance to gangnam style cause all of a sudden people are going to start liking kpop and not embrace American music.’
     
    Now, if he was addressing many other kpop songs and their being highly promoted in China I could understand, but Gangnam Style is just a hugely popular song that happens to be Korean. People like to do the dance and mime the lyrics because its catchy and fun to do. Dancing to Gangnam Style is in no way promoting K-pop.

  • destinyanglin

    I get what he is saying but its just one song.
    Yes I understand that there is probably more of a stronger presence of kpop there than in America but you don’t see american artists saying ‘don’t dance to gangnam style cause all of a sudden people are going to start liking kpop and not embrace American music.’
     
    Now, if he was addressing many other kpop songs and their being highly promoted in China I could understand, but Gangnam Style is just a hugely popular song that happens to be Korean. People like to do the dance and mime the lyrics because its catchy and fun to do. Dancing to Gangnam Style is in no way promoting K-pop.

  • destinyanglin

    I get what he is saying but its just one song.
    Yes I understand that there is probably more of a stronger presence of kpop there than in America but you don’t see american artists saying ‘don’t dance to gangnam style cause all of a sudden people are going to start liking kpop and not embrace American music.’
     
    Now, if he was addressing many other kpop songs and their being highly promoted in China I could understand, but Gangnam Style is just a hugely popular song that happens to be Korean. People like to do the dance and mime the lyrics because its catchy and fun to do. Dancing to Gangnam Style is in no way promoting K-pop.

    • Xaestra

      The reason for the so called “anti-Hallyu” sentiment is because of China’s political history. China and its citizens is very wary of any outside forces that try to enter its boarders. They don’t want anybody altering their polices and whatnot. That includes Japan and Korea, which are more powerful and influential nations that are along China’s boarders/territory. 

      To the entire world, Gangnam Style is now a part of Korea, it’s soft power. For the average joe who was into pop culture, if he or she was asked about Korea, the first images he would have would have to be along the lines of kimchi, spicy food, and possibly Gangnam Style. I know Chou isn’t trying to say avoid/boycott Kpop, but there’s still that mentality that’s probably unconsciously rooted in him. He’s not trying to say boycott, but he is promoting to make Cpop the domineering “idea” in China. Becasue GS is a form of soft power, I believe that it does have a strong impact in China, considering the two nation’s proximity. 

      • destinyanglin

        I can understand wanting to not have your country influenced by outsiders and (like you explained) where his feelings are coming from; but does anyone honestly see some chubby older korean guy doing a horse dance as a symbol of korean power?

        It really seems like Mr. Chou is getting sensitive over something that really is not there.

        • Xaestra

          Like I said, GS is a form of soft power. Its influence is the same that pandas and kung fu hold for China. Politically speaking, there are different types of power, and k-pop and GS just so happens to be one of those powers.

        • Xaestra

          Like I said, GS is a form of soft power. Its influence is the same that pandas and kung fu hold for China. Politically speaking, there are different types of power, and k-pop and GS just so happens to be one of those powers.

  • destinyanglin

    I get what he is saying but its just one song.
    Yes I understand that there is probably more of a stronger presence of kpop there than in America but you don’t see american artists saying ‘don’t dance to gangnam style cause all of a sudden people are going to start liking kpop and not embrace American music.’
     
    Now, if he was addressing many other kpop songs and their being highly promoted in China I could understand, but Gangnam Style is just a hugely popular song that happens to be Korean. People like to do the dance and mime the lyrics because its catchy and fun to do. Dancing to Gangnam Style is in no way promoting K-pop.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

    Just my 2 cents on this issue that has been blown out of proportion:

    Firstly, I think the main reason why Jay Chou said what he said was because the organizer of the chinese award show that he attended actually used Gangnam style as an opening act, which personally, I thought was completely out of place because that was award show to honour the achievements of cpop artists. I understand that Gangnam style is a huge international hit, but isn’t it a little absurd and inconsiderate of the organizers?? I’m a music lover myself and I embrace diversity but you have the King of CPOP there yet you used Gangnam style as an opening act???

    Second, the Chinese media twisted his words and took it out of context because I watched the videos and in no way was he trying to encourage people to boycott KPOP (chinese media kept using the word ‘suppress’). As one of the most influential artists in general of the chinese entertainment, he merely stated his opinion that chinese artists should unite and strive to improve instead of always riding on the kpop hype or sucking up to kpop artists, point in case, imitating the Gangnam style. As a cpop fan myself, it irks me a lot when kpop fans comment that cpop doesn’t produce quality music, if your definition of quality is excessive autotune and hook songs, then I would have to say, no thanks…because I would rather cpop have a healthy balance of solos singers and idols that encompasses a diverse range of music genres. Admittedly, the korean mainstream music is saturated with idols, all those flashy in sync dance moves, glamorous appearance and hook songs give off the illusion of high quality music, but seriously?Should good music be defined so shallowly like that? I’m a kpop fan as well but I really only listen to a selected few (I prefer singer-songwriters) because the mainstream kpop is getting very repetitive and non-idol singers are constantly overshadowed. This phenomenon is a huge contrast to cpop where singer-songwriters are highly revered and  flashy dances and good looks are not the utmost requirements for success, it’s the passion and musical talent that allow cpop singers to stay as popular as they are. (Just compare the music awards, you’ll get what I mean….)

    While I think Jay Chou could have phrased his thoughts more graciously and his remark did come off quite rude but I don’t think it was a personal malicious jab at PSY or xenophobic, it’s more like he was using Gangnam style as a reference to kpop (does anyone who understand mandarin feel the same??), He has always been quite cocky with his words, it’s definitely not the first time he expressed his desire to compete with kpop/jpop, so, I don’t understand why chinese media is making such a huge deal out of it. 

    I wish I could write more but I think this is getting too long as a comment and…I’m not even a huge fan of Jay Chou-__-….btw, that news of him copying kpop style is probably one of the most ridiculous articles that the hk media has ever churned out….so, blonde hair and six packs = kpop???Wow…since when did kpop artists patented those????

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

    Just my 2 cents on this issue that has been blown out of proportion:

    Firstly, I think the main reason why Jay Chou said what he said was because the organizer of the chinese award show that he attended actually used Gangnam style as an opening act, which personally, I thought was completely out of place because that was award show to honour the achievements of cpop artists. I understand that Gangnam style is a huge international hit, but isn’t it a little absurd and inconsiderate of the organizers?? I’m a music lover myself and I embrace diversity but you have the King of CPOP there yet you used Gangnam style as an opening act???

    Second, the Chinese media twisted his words and took it out of context because I watched the videos and in no way was he trying to encourage people to boycott KPOP (chinese media kept using the word ‘suppress’). As one of the most influential artists in general of the chinese entertainment, he merely stated his opinion that chinese artists should unite and strive to improve instead of always riding on the kpop hype or sucking up to kpop artists, point in case, imitating the Gangnam style. As a cpop fan myself, it irks me a lot when kpop fans comment that cpop doesn’t produce quality music, if your definition of quality is excessive autotune and hook songs, then I would have to say, no thanks…because I would rather cpop have a healthy balance of solos singers and idols that encompasses a diverse range of music genres. Admittedly, the korean mainstream music is saturated with idols, all those flashy in sync dance moves, glamorous appearance and hook songs give off the illusion of high quality music, but seriously?Should good music be defined so shallowly like that? I’m a kpop fan as well but I really only listen to a selected few (I prefer singer-songwriters) because the mainstream kpop is getting very repetitive and non-idol singers are constantly overshadowed. This phenomenon is a huge contrast to cpop where singer-songwriters are highly revered and  flashy dances and good looks are not the utmost requirements for success, it’s the passion and musical talent that allow cpop singers to stay as popular as they are. (Just compare the music awards, you’ll get what I mean….)

    While I think Jay Chou could have phrased his thoughts more graciously and his remark did come off quite rude but I don’t think it was a personal malicious jab at PSY or xenophobic, it’s more like he was using Gangnam style as a reference to kpop (does anyone who understand mandarin feel the same??), He has always been quite cocky with his words, it’s definitely not the first time he expressed his desire to compete with kpop/jpop, so, I don’t understand why chinese media is making such a huge deal out of it. 

    I wish I could write more but I think this is getting too long as a comment and…I’m not even a huge fan of Jay Chou-__-….btw, that news of him copying kpop style is probably one of the most ridiculous articles that the hk media has ever churned out….so, blonde hair and six packs = kpop???Wow…since when did kpop artists patented those????

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

    Just my 2 cents on this issue that has been blown out of proportion:

    Firstly, I think the main reason why Jay Chou said what he said was because the organizer of the chinese award show that he attended actually used Gangnam style as an opening act, which personally, I thought was completely out of place because that was award show to honour the achievements of cpop artists. I understand that Gangnam style is a huge international hit, but isn’t it a little absurd and inconsiderate of the organizers?? I’m a music lover myself and I embrace diversity but you have the King of CPOP there yet you used Gangnam style as an opening act???

    Second, the Chinese media twisted his words and took it out of context because I watched the videos and in no way was he trying to encourage people to boycott KPOP (chinese media kept using the word ‘suppress’). As one of the most influential artists in general of the chinese entertainment, he merely stated his opinion that chinese artists should unite and strive to improve instead of always riding on the kpop hype or sucking up to kpop artists, point in case, imitating the Gangnam style. As a cpop fan myself, it irks me a lot when kpop fans comment that cpop doesn’t produce quality music, if your definition of quality is excessive autotune and hook songs, then I would have to say, no thanks…because I would rather cpop have a healthy balance of solos singers and idols that encompasses a diverse range of music genres. Admittedly, the korean mainstream music is saturated with idols, all those flashy in sync dance moves, glamorous appearance and hook songs give off the illusion of high quality music, but seriously?Should good music be defined so shallowly like that? I’m a kpop fan as well but I really only listen to a selected few (I prefer singer-songwriters) because the mainstream kpop is getting very repetitive and non-idol singers are constantly overshadowed. This phenomenon is a huge contrast to cpop where singer-songwriters are highly revered and  flashy dances and good looks are not the utmost requirements for success, it’s the passion and musical talent that allow cpop singers to stay as popular as they are. (Just compare the music awards, you’ll get what I mean….)

    While I think Jay Chou could have phrased his thoughts more graciously and his remark did come off quite rude but I don’t think it was a personal malicious jab at PSY or xenophobic, it’s more like he was using Gangnam style as a reference to kpop (does anyone who understand mandarin feel the same??), He has always been quite cocky with his words, it’s definitely not the first time he expressed his desire to compete with kpop/jpop, so, I don’t understand why chinese media is making such a huge deal out of it. 

    I wish I could write more but I think this is getting too long as a comment and…I’m not even a huge fan of Jay Chou-__-….btw, that news of him copying kpop style is probably one of the most ridiculous articles that the hk media has ever churned out….so, blonde hair and six packs = kpop???Wow…since when did kpop artists patented those????

    • canistillhaveadream2

      (I was trying to leave a comment, but for some reason I kept failing and all of my comments didn’t show up after all here on the comment-box. So I finally decided to create my second username, “canistillhaveadream2″. Let’s see if I could make it this time with this new username, lol…)

      First, it’s very interesting that big part of your LONG comment is actually about how shallow Kpop is and how not-shallow Cpop is. Because this issue is obviously never about which one is shallow/deep or which one is better. (Sure, here are some comments criticizing Cpop, too, but no, I don’t see any point of criticizing it, either, because it’s not about Cpop in general but it’s about a single Cpop artist.)

      Now, in THAT point of view, it’s also totally, absolutely irrelevant whether or not Jay Chou is a legend/kind of Cpop. I honestly find it unbelievably hilarious that many comments here and the article itself try to display how big he is in Cpop. A legend can say such a thing while others can’t? It is what you guys are trying to say? Well, sorry, but I sincerely don’t care how big he is. I only care what he said.

      Second, so you do admit that he’s kind of cocky and has always been showing his peculiar desire to compete with Kpop/Jpop, right? Because, I swear to God, I only accidentally got to know his name, Jay Chou, by reading some articles about his ill feeling towards Kpop and Hallyu. I mean, every time I accidentally come across any article on him, it’s always about his ill feeling towards growing Kpop and Hallyu. Without it, here in South Korea, I couldn’t have even got to know his name to be honest. But please don’t blame me or Korean medias. Because it’s nobody’s fault that Cpop artists are usually unfamiliar to Korean people and thus, Korean medias don’t really cover them much.

      Now, here is my little question.

      What if a Korean singer said like, “Let’s not dance to Justin Bieber’s song in public” or “Let’s not sing Adele’s song on stage” just because these are so viral around the world including Korea, but unfortunately not Korean?

      I mean, just imagine. Could you guys still defend the Korean artist as you’re now obviously doing for Jay Chou? No, I don’t think so. I believe many of you would brutally criticize him and call him obnoxiously nationalistic. (I mean, you guys are always considering Koreans overly nationalistic as though you don’t care about your own countries at all and completely cosmopolitan. Am I wrong?)

      There’s always something bizarre on Seoulbeats and other Kpop-related international sites that really puzzles me. Even though you guys are all Kpop lovers or at least Kpop listeners, you guys are always specifically STRICT with Kpop artists, Korean people, and above all, Korea, the country, as a whole. But now, just look at how some of you guys are being very much tolerant about an issue like this, maybe because, luckily, he’s not Korean…? I don’t know.

      Thank God, it’s not a Korean artist singling out a non-Korean foreign artist, but it’s completely the other way around. Because if he was Korean, oh, well, only God would know how brutally he would get bashed and criticized by the whole international community of Kpop.

    • canistillhaveadream2

      (I was trying to leave a comment, but for some reason I kept failing and all of my comments didn’t show up after all here on the comment-box. So I finally decided to create my second username, “canistillhaveadream2″. Let’s see if I could make it this time with this new username, lol…)

      First, it’s very interesting that big part of your LONG comment is actually about how shallow Kpop is and how not-shallow Cpop is. Because this issue is obviously never about which one is shallow/deep or which one is better. (Sure, here are some comments criticizing Cpop, too, but no, I don’t see any point of criticizing it, either, because it’s not about Cpop in general but it’s about a single Cpop artist.)

      Now, in THAT point of view, it’s also totally, absolutely irrelevant whether or not Jay Chou is a legend/kind of Cpop. I honestly find it unbelievably hilarious that many comments here and the article itself try to display how big he is in Cpop. A legend can say such a thing while others can’t? It is what you guys are trying to say? Well, sorry, but I sincerely don’t care how big he is. I only care what he said.

      Second, so you do admit that he’s kind of cocky and has always been showing his peculiar desire to compete with Kpop/Jpop, right? Because, I swear to God, I only accidentally got to know his name, Jay Chou, by reading some articles about his ill feeling towards Kpop and Hallyu. I mean, every time I accidentally come across any article on him, it’s always about his ill feeling towards growing Kpop and Hallyu. Without it, here in South Korea, I couldn’t have even got to know his name to be honest. But please don’t blame me or Korean medias. Because it’s nobody’s fault that Cpop artists are usually unfamiliar to Korean people and thus, Korean medias don’t really cover them much.

      Now, here is my little question.

      What if a Korean singer said like, “Let’s not dance to Justin Bieber’s song in public” or “Let’s not sing Adele’s song on stage” just because these are so viral around the world including Korea, but unfortunately not Korean?

      I mean, just imagine. Could you guys still defend the Korean artist as you’re now obviously doing for Jay Chou? No, I don’t think so. I believe many of you would brutally criticize him and call him obnoxiously nationalistic. (I mean, you guys are always considering Koreans overly nationalistic as though you don’t care about your own countries at all and completely cosmopolitan. Am I wrong?)

      There’s always something bizarre on Seoulbeats and other Kpop-related international sites that really puzzles me. Even though you guys are all Kpop lovers or at least Kpop listeners, you guys are always specifically STRICT with Kpop artists, Korean people, and above all, Korea, the country, as a whole. But now, just look at how some of you guys are being very much tolerant about an issue like this, maybe because, luckily, he’s not Korean…? I don’t know.

      Thank God, it’s not a Korean artist singling out a non-Korean foreign artist, but it’s completely the other way around. Because if he was Korean, oh, well, only God would know how brutally he would get bashed and criticized by the whole international community of Kpop.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/RUUFQCBA3PEZP7AKESBML6M2GM Neal

        It seems to me that the competition among K-pop, J-pop, and C-pop are also closely tied with each country’s national identity and their history.  This is why we have this Jay Chou controversy, the circus regarding no K-pop artists being invited to that Kohaku music festival in Japan, etc.

        In the western world, it seems that music fans don’t really drag the artists’ origins into their evaluation of the artists.  A lot of people don’t like Justin Bieber, but they don’t suddenly rant about Canadians trying to take over the US music industry. When Latin music was hot back in the Ricky Martin days in the late 90’s, I don’t remember the American public being hostile to its success or hating on the Latino community. Even when sometimes US news media speaks of “British invasion” with the success of British artists in the US, it’s spoken in friendly terms, not this “us VS them” mentality like these East Asian artists (and I’m sure there are other parts of the world too with similar issues, but I’m talking about the issue with Korea, Japan, and China specifically).

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/RUUFQCBA3PEZP7AKESBML6M2GM Neal

        It seems to me that the competition among K-pop, J-pop, and C-pop are also closely tied with each country’s national identity and their history.  This is why we have this Jay Chou controversy, the circus regarding no K-pop artists being invited to that Kohaku music festival in Japan, etc.

        In the western world, it seems that music fans don’t really drag the artists’ origins into their evaluation of the artists.  A lot of people don’t like Justin Bieber, but they don’t suddenly rant about Canadians trying to take over the US music industry. When Latin music was hot back in the Ricky Martin days in the late 90’s, I don’t remember the American public being hostile to its success or hating on the Latino community. Even when sometimes US news media speaks of “British invasion” with the success of British artists in the US, it’s spoken in friendly terms, not this “us VS them” mentality like these East Asian artists (and I’m sure there are other parts of the world too with similar issues, but I’m talking about the issue with Korea, Japan, and China specifically).

        • canistillhaveadream2

          Yes, it’s not even a secret that there are some historical issues between the three Far East countries. But as a Korean I would say, here in Korea, there are way more issues related to Japan rather than China. 

          I mean, I swear to God, Koreans have no deep-rooted ill feeling towards China or Taiwan. (I’m speaking of Taiwan, too, only because I accidentally found out Jay Chou is actually Taiwanese. Correct me if I’m wrong.) Therefore sometimes I get totally shocked when I get to know some Chinese-speaking celebrities have some ill feeling towards Korea, and start to ask myself like, “Huh??? What did we do to them???” Because obviously we’ve never actually INVADED or colonized any part of China/Taiwan. So, why hatred?

          Anyways, speaking of Cpop, there’s no sense of rivalry or competition here in Korea. Because as I said, Cpop artists are not even familiar to Korean people in the first place. Most of Korean people listen to only Korean music most of the time and maybe some American/British music casually. But that’s all. Period. It’s like American people enjoying their own entertainment products only. And I never see it as a problem.

          Back in the late 80s, there was a really big boom of Hong Kong movies in Korea: Especially the Hong Kong noir films. Back then, some Hong Kong/Taiwanese celebrities were so much loved by Korean people, and there was absolutely NO backlash or any ill sense of rivalry. Never. Some of these celebrities are still very much admired by Korean people, like Leslie Cheung, Joey Wang, etc. So in short, when we love, we just love. No some peculiar sense of rivalry, as long as they didn’t actually invade/colonize us, you know what I mean…

          • whereex

            For the record, China dislikes Korea for many reasons other than something as stupid as a music rivalry.  Ya know like maybe NORTH KOREA, with whom China happens to be a military ally.  Chinese people also get annoyed with Korea for claiming parts of Chinese culture as their own…. IE. saying Confucius was Korean, saying the Dragon Boat Festival is of Korean origin, even something as silly as who invented Jia Jiang Mian.

            Taiwan doesn’t like Korea because they’re rivals economically, and also because Korea “cheats” that all sorts of international sporting events.  More importantly, because South Korea abandoned Taiwan politically and supports the PRC government, while Korea itself is in a war with a communist country who’s allied with the PRC.

            So umm, for the record international relations isn’t all about movies and Kpop.  And Hong Kong is not equal to Taiwan is not equal to China.

            Also, in my experience, my Korean friends have all really loved Leslie Cheung because he was so handsome… then I inform them that he was gay and was in a relationship for 20+ years with the same guy, and he suddenly becomes much less handsome. =(

          • canistillhaveadream2

            1. Oh, Chinese people get annoyed with Korea for claiming parts of Chinese culture as their own?

            You mean, like, Korean people get freaking annoyed with China for claiming “Arirang” as their song? Duh.

            2. “Saying Confucius was Korean, saying the Dragon Boat Festival is of Korean origin, even something as silly as who invented Jia Jiang Mian.”

            (1) Saying Confucius is Korean? Do you REALLY HONESTLY believe that such an absol-fucking-utely stupid rumor is true? Do you? Do you really believe that? Like, Koreans don’t have books, don’t have any Internet connections, don’t have any decent information to find out the world-widely known simple fact that Confucius is Chinese? Do you really believe that? Huh?

            And if you really do believe that, well, I just have to say you don’t have a brain. Period.

            (2) I have no idea what the hell “Dragon Boat Festival” or “Jia Jiang Mian” is IN THE FIRST PLACE, lol… What are these?

            3. I never believe that Taiwan dislikes Korea because of some political reasons. No.

            But even if they do dislike us because we abandoned(????) them, then I would say, “Let it be”. Because it’s never our fault that they don’t understand there’s no eternal friend/enemy in the international politics. And in that point of view, they’re just whining political amateurs. Sorry.

            4. If some of your friends find Leslie Cheung no more charming just because he’s gay, then you suddenly start to think the rest of 50 million Korean people share the same idea? Is it what you’re trying to say?

            Girl, grow up.

          • whereex

             Okay, sweetheart, Google “Dragon boat festival korea” or “Confucius Korea” if you are for some reason are unable to accept these facts.  You keep implying that you’re Korean or in Korea in your responses– but you’re obviously not, because these are two HUGE points of contention between Korea and China which every Chinese and Korean person knows about.  Also, there’s no way you’re in Korea if you don’t know what jiajiangmian is, it’s a national food of Korea (although originally brought from China, hence the contention).

            If you don’t believe that Taiwanese people dislike Korea for politically supporting communist China instead of democratic Taiwan… I can’t help you?  I am Taiwanese, I live in Taiwan.  This is real and it’s what we think about South Korea.  If you don’t believe it… again with the burritos analogy.  Just because you don’t believe it doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.  You perception is not an unquestionable truth.

            Leslie Cheung was an amazing actor and singer.  He was also openly gay at a time where it was not at all acceptable, and it really advanced HK and Taiwan’s perception of gay men… and he needs to be respected for that.  I just find it very interesting every time I go to Korea and he gets mentioned that this always seems to be conveniently omitted from the conversation… and then when it’s brought up his “fans” start to backpedal very quickly.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            Wow, Taiwanese people really do love to assume everything. Now you start to assume that I’m not Korean or not living in Korea.

            1. Some Koreans are aware that many Taiwanese/Chinese people are upset because of the Confucius thingy. 

            (I said, “some” Koreans. Because most of Koreans don’t really care about Confucianism anymore in the first place. Since, as you know, Korea is now a Westernized modern country, and most Korean people are NOT even interested in Confucianism. Young generations only very much regret parts of their history with conservative Confucianism. Sorry.)

            So, now I’ll give you an enlightening moment here. The real reaction of Koreans on that Confucius issue is, actually: “Huh?? Why are they upset because of the stupid rumor that THEY created themselves??” Now you get it?

            2. I still have no idea what the hell “Dragon Boat Festival” is. Please don’t assume your Chinese cultural thing is familiar to every goddamn human being on the Earth. How pathetically arrogant you sound there, huh?

            3. Oh, “Jia Jian Mian”! I see! It’s called “짜장면” or “자장면”, so I didn’t get your romanization at first. But now I get it.

            Oh, yes. “짜장면” is Chinese food and that’s why it’s only sold at Chinese restaurants here in Korea.

            Now look carefully. I would NEVER believe it if anyone tells me that some Taiwanese people are arguing Kimchi is their food.

            Because luckily, I have a brain, and as far as I have a brain, I could never believe any Taiwanese would say such a stupid thing.

            Now, THAT is why I’m saying you don’t have a brain. Understood? Please, get a brain.

            EDIT: Taiwanese dislike Korea because of the political reasons? Then, well, “Let it be”. Because as I said, it’s never our fault that you’re just whining political AMATEURS.

          • whereex

            Well, I’m glad that you did a Google search and discovered all the things I talked about so you can now claim to be Korean on Kpop websites with more authenticity.  I still don’t believe you’re in Korea if you don’t know what the Dragon Boat Festival is, so you should look that up too.

            ps.  There’s a difference between the man Confucius and Confucianism.  Wikipedia that too.

            pss. Cursing at people online and telling them they’re stupid doesn’t make your innane arguments more valid.  Go back to allkpop or whatever pit you came from.  We have intelligent discussions on this website.

          • whereex
          • canistillhaveadream2

            Lol, the link!!! Wow, you’re f**king obsessed!! But sorry, I don’t have time to read it all. I just saw some pictures of boats.

            But I still don’t get what these are. I mean, they ARE just boats, but I’ve never seen any boats like them here in Korea. 

            And above all, I’ve never heard of “Dragon Boat Festival” in the first place. No. 

            Even if you were Almighty God and you were gonna give me an eternal punishment for not having heard of it, still, I could not say I’ve ever heard of it. Sorry.

            P.S. If you hate Korean people so much, how do you even listen to Kpop? I mean, Kpop is sung by Korean people, isn’t it?

            Because if I were you, I could NEVER like or listen to Kpop. 

            But look at you! You’re not only listening to Kpop, but also regularly visiting Kpop-related English sites and even leaving some LONG comments…

            That is…BIZARRE.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            Oh, I don’t curse at everyone. I only curse at those who don’t have any ability to have civilized conversations/discussions as a decent human being.

            And if you don’t get what I’m saying, please just look at how obnoxious your first two comments sounded there.

            Also, I recommend you to read all of my comments again and find out the fact that I cursed at YOU only. You do know why, don’t you?

            And no. No, I didn’t google anything. And above all, I don’t think you really get my real point there.

            So I’ll repeat it again. Only for you!! — The real reaction of Koreans on that ridiculous Confucius issue is, actually: “What? Why are they upset because of the stupid rumor that THEY created themselves?”

            Duh.

          • whereex

            You asked why there is anti-Korean sentiment from China and Taiwan.  I explained it to you.  Sorry if by explaining it to you it became apparent how ignorant you are.  Sometimes it’s hard for me to hide by disdain for silly international Kpop fans who don’t understand the people or culture of the country they obsess about so much.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            @whereex 

            Lol, poor girl! When exactly did I ask anyone to explain anything? 

            No, I didn’t ask anything. I was just expressing my FEELINGS on that issue. You just don’t get real nuances on other people’s comments. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

            P.S. You still believe I’m an international fan, don’t you? Well, in a way, I kind of love it that way!! Lol… 

            Well, just believe whatever you want to believe. As you Taiwanese people always believe malicious rumors on Korea.

          • Brave400

            No need to be a d*ck. She/he was just trying to explain why Korean/China ill relations extend beyond music. Yes, those thing may seem asinine, but so does that whole island beef between Korea and Japan to some.

            You should take your own advice about growing up and learn how to debate people without throwing insults.

          • Brave400

            No need to be a d*ck. She/he was just trying to explain why Korean/China ill relations extend beyond music. Yes, those thing may seem asinine, but so does that whole island beef between Korea and Japan to some.

            You should take your own advice about growing up and learn how to debate people without throwing insults.

          • Brave400

            No need to be a d*ck. She/he was just trying to explain why Korean/China ill relations extend beyond music. Yes, those thing may seem asinine, but so does that whole island beef between Korea and Japan to some.

            You should take your own advice about growing up and learn how to debate people without throwing insults.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            But what if the so-called reasons of ill relations sound only ridiculous? Like, Koreans are arguing Confucius is Korean?

            And not only that, what if the attitude of explaining itself is already pretty much off-putting?

            Read every comment here carefully, and find out who started to sound hostile towards another person here, really.

          • haiyan46

            I can actually understand why this person is so upset, though the rudeness really is unnecessary. The rumors posted (ex: Koreans think that Confucius is Korean) are spread by the Chinese just to rally anti-Korean sentiment in China, even though they are completely not true. There are various Chinese blogs full of lies about what people have “experienced” in Korea, just to further spread these sentiments. 

            And they work too. A Chinese friend of mine used to really love Korean stuff, until she came across one of these blogs, and believed everything written there (even if the claims were absolutely ridiculous). Honestly, I would be offended if people were spreading and believing such blatantly made-up rumors about my people. 

            Also, as a side-note… the beliefs that Koreans “cheat” in economics or play dirty in politics seems to be widely popular beliefs among the Chinese. However, I would like to point out just how unfair those kinds of views really are. In this world of politics, there is no right and wrong side, or a good or evil. Just many different countries attempting to maximize their gain while minimizing loss. Everyone partakes in this, therefore it’s wrong just to accuse one country of such behavior. To assume otherwise is just an example of ignorance and immaturity.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            Thank you.

            I sincerely thank you whoever you are.

      • whereex

         I think people are mentioning that he’s a legend because some of the things that Kpop fans are saying against him are ridiculous.  That he’s copying some Idol’s style or that he’s depressed because of Kpop’s success.  Uhh, wut.  It’d be like if David Bowie said he found One Direction annoying, and people started claiming it was because he was jealous.  Ummm, obviously not.  Kpop fans can sometimes be so out of touch with reality (see: music outside of their own little niche, which in reality is not that influential), and need to get reminded of that.

        And because you haven’t heard of Jay Chou that suddenly makes him irrelevant?  I had a friend who’d never eaten a burrito before.  Does that mean burritos don’t exist?  You’ve never seen articles on Jay Chou because you don’t read Chinese.  Get back to me when you do.

        I don’t call him “obnoxiously nationalistic” because Jay Chou has gotten in trouble in the past for his views against China (he is Taiwanese not Chinese, go Google that if you don’t know why it’s important), so saying he’s a strong Chinese nationalist is… misinformed to say the least.

        You obviously don’t read or speak Chinese, so it’s difficult for you to judge the context of what was being said.  The guy didn’t want to do Gangnam Style.  IMO it’s probably just because the song is annoying, not due to some Cpop/Kpop rivalry or whatever else people are trying to create out of this.

      • whereex

         I think people are mentioning that he’s a legend because some of the things that Kpop fans are saying against him are ridiculous.  That he’s copying some Idol’s style or that he’s depressed because of Kpop’s success.  Uhh, wut.  It’d be like if David Bowie said he found One Direction annoying, and people started claiming it was because he was jealous.  Ummm, obviously not.  Kpop fans can sometimes be so out of touch with reality (see: music outside of their own little niche, which in reality is not that influential), and need to get reminded of that.

        And because you haven’t heard of Jay Chou that suddenly makes him irrelevant?  I had a friend who’d never eaten a burrito before.  Does that mean burritos don’t exist?  You’ve never seen articles on Jay Chou because you don’t read Chinese.  Get back to me when you do.

        I don’t call him “obnoxiously nationalistic” because Jay Chou has gotten in trouble in the past for his views against China (he is Taiwanese not Chinese, go Google that if you don’t know why it’s important), so saying he’s a strong Chinese nationalist is… misinformed to say the least.

        You obviously don’t read or speak Chinese, so it’s difficult for you to judge the context of what was being said.  The guy didn’t want to do Gangnam Style.  IMO it’s probably just because the song is annoying, not due to some Cpop/Kpop rivalry or whatever else people are trying to create out of this.

      • whereex

         I think people are mentioning that he’s a legend because some of the things that Kpop fans are saying against him are ridiculous.  That he’s copying some Idol’s style or that he’s depressed because of Kpop’s success.  Uhh, wut.  It’d be like if David Bowie said he found One Direction annoying, and people started claiming it was because he was jealous.  Ummm, obviously not.  Kpop fans can sometimes be so out of touch with reality (see: music outside of their own little niche, which in reality is not that influential), and need to get reminded of that.

        And because you haven’t heard of Jay Chou that suddenly makes him irrelevant?  I had a friend who’d never eaten a burrito before.  Does that mean burritos don’t exist?  You’ve never seen articles on Jay Chou because you don’t read Chinese.  Get back to me when you do.

        I don’t call him “obnoxiously nationalistic” because Jay Chou has gotten in trouble in the past for his views against China (he is Taiwanese not Chinese, go Google that if you don’t know why it’s important), so saying he’s a strong Chinese nationalist is… misinformed to say the least.

        You obviously don’t read or speak Chinese, so it’s difficult for you to judge the context of what was being said.  The guy didn’t want to do Gangnam Style.  IMO it’s probably just because the song is annoying, not due to some Cpop/Kpop rivalry or whatever else people are trying to create out of this.

        • canistillhaveadream2

          When exactly did I say he’s irrelevant because I’ve never heard of him? Did you even read my comment?

          I’ve NEVER said he’s irrelevant to begin with. I said whether he’s a legend or not is irrelevant. Do you really believe that these two sentences mean the same thing? 

          Go back to my comment and read it again if you want to have some decent and civilized argument with me. Because you’re only pathetically showing how much you’re butthurt by my comments. Please calm your tits.

          Plus, I know he’s Taiwanese. Obviously you’ve never really read any of my comments here. Tsk, tsk.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

        First of all, I would like to apologize if my comment has offended you in any way. I wrote it in the middle of the night, hence, my brains just went off tangent and I agree that the shallow/non-shallow music point  is an entirely different issue (though I would like to clarify that I meant the mainstream music market in each country and not the quality per se)…..ok, moving on….

        I never stated that Jay Chou is allowed to say what he said just because he is a legend or  King of Cpop….what I tried to say in his defense was that the chinese media took his words out of context…Assuming that you don’t understand mandarin at all, he actually said  that he thinks that the hallyu wave is very strong, `cpop artists should unite and work harder in order to be stronger than hallyu wave, so, stop imitating Gangnam style and that to him, cpop is the best’ …

        Where did he mention that people should stop listening to kpop??He merely encouraged cpop artists to be more original and stop succumbing to the hype that is Gangnam style.

        Is that statement cocky?YES , arrogant?YES  competitive?YES but racist, overnationalistic??NO….He wasn’t belittling kpop or PSY or Korea in anyway, while he acknowledges the popularity of kpop, in his own opinion, he thinks cpop is better….how would that be offensive considering that he expressed his sentiment at a Chinese award show… don’t you have korean news outlet reporting on the popularity of korean artists in China, Japan etc??or Korean artists talking about how popular they are overseas?Isn’t that also a display of pride like how Jay Chou is of his own music or cpop in general?

        Again, as cocky as his statement may sound, he is entitled to his opinion as much as you are to yours……if you insist on saying that he was trying to insult PSY or belittling kpop eventhough I have provided the translation of his statement then, go ahead…it’s your opinion…..

        AND BTW, I’m not particularly strict about kpop artists and their conduct….I didn’t think much of PSY’s past anti-America song (and the content was way more controversial and offensive than what Jay Chou said). Artists are human beings with emotions like the rest of us….so, no, I have no double standards for all the artists I like based on their ethnicity…..

        • canistillhaveadream2

          1. I didn’t find your comment particularly offensive. No. But as I said, I found out big part of your long comment was actually about how shallow Kpop is while Cpop is not, and thought it was very interesting because I’ve always wondered why so many international Kpop fans so much love to criticize Kpop so harshly. I mean, I’ve been watching these Kpop-related international sites for years now (like Allkpop, Seoulbeats, Omona, Netizenbuzz, Soompi, etc.), so yeah, I KNOW you guys kind of enjoy criticizing Kpop, like some kind of leisure activities or something…

          I mean, if you think Kpop is shallow while the music from your own race/ethnicity/country is not, why do you even bother to listen to it in the first place? But please, please, please, don’t take this question personally. Because now I’m not asking you personally but asking all of those Kpop listeners who share the same idea, “Kpop is shallow.”

          And if you listen to Kpop BECAUSE OF the shallowness, then hell, I absolutely don’t see any point of complaining about it.

          So my point is: No, I never found your comment particularly offensive. But it clearly had something in it that I’ve always wanted to argue about.

          2. “Where did he mention that people should stop listening to Kpop?”

          No, I didn’t say that. 

          3. I didn’t say he is racist, either. Being nationalistic is not being racist. And yes, unfortunately, I still do believe he was very much nationalistic when mentioning about “Gangnam Style”. (And I wasn’t even surprised this time because it was never my first time to hear about his attitude towards Kpop and Hallyu. But well, whatever.)

          To be real honest, I don’t think being nationalistic is a problem. Or, not a big problem at least. Being overly/obnoxiously nationalistic is a problem. And I do know many of international Kpop fans assume Koreans are overly/obnoxiously nationalistic. Thus, I thought: “What if this guy was Korean? Would these international Kpop fans still defend him as they’re doing for Jay Chou so ardently?”

          And the answer is…NO. Unfortunately, hell, no. 

          So I was just pointing out how awfully many of these international Kpop fans can be hypocrites. 

          But since you’re arguing you’re not one of them, okay, then, I’m going to believe you, sincerely. And thank you for not specifically strict with Kpop artists, Korean people, and Korea. I really thank you.

          Because being FAIR between Korean people and your own people and between Korea and your own country would be the very first thing that I would love to ask for from international Kpop fans around the world.

          P.S. I apologize, too, if you were any offended by any part of my comment.

        • canistillhaveadream2

          1. I didn’t find your comment particularly offensive. No. But as I said, I found out big part of your long comment was actually about how shallow Kpop is while Cpop is not, and thought it was very interesting because I’ve always wondered why so many international Kpop fans so much love to criticize Kpop so harshly. I mean, I’ve been watching these Kpop-related international sites for years now (like Allkpop, Seoulbeats, Omona, Netizenbuzz, Soompi, etc.), so yeah, I KNOW you guys kind of enjoy criticizing Kpop, like some kind of leisure activities or something…

          I mean, if you think Kpop is shallow while the music from your own race/ethnicity/country is not, why do you even bother to listen to it in the first place? But please, please, please, don’t take this question personally. Because now I’m not asking you personally but asking all of those Kpop listeners who share the same idea, “Kpop is shallow.”

          And if you listen to Kpop BECAUSE OF the shallowness, then hell, I absolutely don’t see any point of complaining about it.

          So my point is: No, I never found your comment particularly offensive. But it clearly had something in it that I’ve always wanted to argue about.

          2. “Where did he mention that people should stop listening to Kpop?”

          No, I didn’t say that. 

          3. I didn’t say he is racist, either. Being nationalistic is not being racist. And yes, unfortunately, I still do believe he was very much nationalistic when mentioning about “Gangnam Style”. (And I wasn’t even surprised this time because it was never my first time to hear about his attitude towards Kpop and Hallyu. But well, whatever.)

          To be real honest, I don’t think being nationalistic is a problem. Or, not a big problem at least. Being overly/obnoxiously nationalistic is a problem. And I do know many of international Kpop fans assume Koreans are overly/obnoxiously nationalistic. Thus, I thought: “What if this guy was Korean? Would these international Kpop fans still defend him as they’re doing for Jay Chou so ardently?”

          And the answer is…NO. Unfortunately, hell, no. 

          So I was just pointing out how awfully many of these international Kpop fans can be hypocrites. 

          But since you’re arguing you’re not one of them, okay, then, I’m going to believe you, sincerely. And thank you for not specifically strict with Kpop artists, Korean people, and Korea. I really thank you.

          Because being FAIR between Korean people and your own people and between Korea and your own country would be the very first thing that I would love to ask for from international Kpop fans around the world.

          P.S. I apologize, too, if you were any offended by any part of my comment.

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

            Jay Chou is getting a lot of backlash from chinese/international netizens as well..so, getting bashed by netizens is not exclusive to kpop artists……

            I’m pretty sure if this was posted on allkpop, you’ll have millions of comments insulting jay chou left and right (I actually find the comments here on seoulbeats a lot more civillized)…. I really don’t know how many hypocritical kpop fans you’ve ever encountered but I have encountered quite a lot of biased kpop fans who seem to think that kpop artists can do no wrong….

            Lastly, irregardless of ethnicity/nationality or how great an artist is, there will always be haters (yes, including Jay Chou)….so chill….I don’t think anyone in particular harbours any vendetta towards kpop artists or Korea.

            *I never intended to whine about the whole shallow/non-shallow issue and definitely used the wrong venue to express my opinion on this matter, so, I apologize again for the digression in my first comment. I merely think kpop has been running in a vicious cycle of idol music in recent years and it’s just not how it used to be but I definitely don’t go around bashing or criticizing kpop artists on kpop entertainment websites like you’ve mentioned in your reply. If I don’t like what I hear, I just click the close button….I hardly listen to new kpop songs, Big Bang and Miss A are probably few of  the only kpop idols that I still like and follow….

            I better stop here before I digress again. Well, I guess that’s all I got to say…………………peace^^

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/WPYHKYROEY4RSCLJ3ACNO5GDII hews

            Jay Chou is getting a lot of backlash from chinese/international netizens as well..so, getting bashed by netizens is not exclusive to kpop artists……

            I’m pretty sure if this was posted on allkpop, you’ll have millions of comments insulting jay chou left and right (I actually find the comments here on seoulbeats a lot more civillized)…. I really don’t know how many hypocritical kpop fans you’ve ever encountered but I have encountered quite a lot of biased kpop fans who seem to think that kpop artists can do no wrong….

            Lastly, irregardless of ethnicity/nationality or how great an artist is, there will always be haters (yes, including Jay Chou)….so chill….I don’t think anyone in particular harbours any vendetta towards kpop artists or Korea.

            *I never intended to whine about the whole shallow/non-shallow issue and definitely used the wrong venue to express my opinion on this matter, so, I apologize again for the digression in my first comment. I merely think kpop has been running in a vicious cycle of idol music in recent years and it’s just not how it used to be but I definitely don’t go around bashing or criticizing kpop artists on kpop entertainment websites like you’ve mentioned in your reply. If I don’t like what I hear, I just click the close button….I hardly listen to new kpop songs, Big Bang and Miss A are probably few of  the only kpop idols that I still like and follow….

            I better stop here before I digress again. Well, I guess that’s all I got to say…………………peace^^

          • canistillhaveadream2

            To be honest, I didn’t expect you to reply again. 

            Because I said, “Thank you.”, twice, which was sincere, because you said you’re not specifically strict with Koreans and THAT is always one of the most important issues to me, and yeah, I also said, “I apologize.”

            But maybe you still had something to tell, I guess. So well, here’s my answer again.

            I’m awfully sorry, but I don’t think you really understand what I’m saying.

            See. People say Kpop goes viral around the world, but no, Kpop is still not very well-known and still has a long way to go. And despite this situation, you guys listen to/enjoy it for some reason.

            And I’ve always found it very much bizarre that you guys are listening to something that actually nobody knows in real life like a real hipster(I mean, you guys are all still hipsters), AND very much enjoy criticizing every detail of it AT THE SAME TIME.

            It was so much clear that you don’t really understand what I mean when you mentioned Allkpop. I mean, it’s Allkpop! A site exclusively dedicated to Korean pop. Remember? Well, I wouldn’t find it any surprising if I see some comments bashing on Jay Chou there because it’s a Kpop site, not a Cpop site. And in that point of view, I wouldn’t find it any shocking, either, if I see some comments bashing on Kpop artists on Cpop or Jpop sites. No. Never. (I mean, the best thing is that nobody bashes on nobody, but you can’t expect something like that in real life.)

            Now, this is why I used the term, “hypocrite”.

            Like a real hipster, you guys are listening to something that nobody knows, AND so much enjoy criticizing/bashing on every detail of it that many Koreans consider these sites as ANTI-KOREA sites.

            Do you even know that Allkpop is actually considered as an anti-Korea site among Koreans who have been watching it, and there’s even an official article on it from a Korean media?

            And well, I believe if Koreans get to know about this site, Seoulbeats, they wouldn’t really love this one, either. No.

            I even remember some user-names of Seoulbeats/Allkpop who have always made me wonder why they listen to Kpop, visit Kpop-related sites regularly, and even bother to leave some comments. 

            They’re saying: “Oh, yeah! I only listen to Kpop these days and love Kpop idols so much! Their abs! But hell, I hate Korea! Kpop idols are all plastics! And Koreans are all racists! To be honest, Kpop is crap! My country’s music is better! Kpop is shallow!”

            Now, THAT is what I call “hypocrite”.

            And my response to it is: “If you hate Korea/Koreans so much, and if you don’t REALLY love Kpop, then just…don’t listen to it. Simple as that.”

            Now if you still don’t understand what I mean, then well, whatever.

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/RUUFQCBA3PEZP7AKESBML6M2GM Neal

            I know what you mean when you said that K-pop is not as popular as people think it is and many parts of the world still don’t know about it.   As far as this point is concerned, I think it’s useful to be specific about the areas that K-pop has conquered-it’s definitely huge in Southeast Asia, in Korea itself, in HK (I heard), and Japan (although the recent backlash MAY mean that K-pop is on the decline in that country, who knows).  It also seems like K-pop is quite popular in Latin America as well, though I’m not sure by how much.  In the west, I think it’s still a niche market, but a pretty strong one nonetheless.  

            As far as people “hating” on K-pop and still listening to it, here’s a possible explanation: it’s almost like a guilty pleasure.  The beat of K-pop music is catchy and addictive + the visuals are so stimulating, so that’s why the Korean wave is doing quite well.  However, I hesitate calling the typical K-pop music to be deserving of critical acclaim in the way that music from artists like Adele do. Take SNSD’s “Gee,” very catchy and it quite deserves the number of youtube views/however many music shows win it did.  But, (and I’m NOT saying this to insult the songwriters of Gee or the SNSD gals who sang it), compare it to the “artistic quality” of any songs by a Grammy-winning singer like Adele, it’s like comparing a McDonald burger and a gourmet food.  Now, I’m not trying to piss you off or anything and you are more than welcomed to say that my opinion is subjective or that Adele and SNSD are completely different artists (which is true).  I think the criticisms are thrown because many K-pop fans want the music to be more than just repetitive and formulaic.  Not that repetitive, formulaic music won’t gain plenty of listeners (because they are recipes that work), but K-pop idols can do better than just keep on producing the same old stuff over and over again. I’d like to see it as constructive criticism, really. Personally, I’d like to see K-pop producing more singer-songwriter type of artists. It doesn’t mean that idols suck because all they do is sing what’s given to them–takes lots of talent and hard work to perform well.  Still, if they can start to produce music on their own, it’d be even better.  Unfortunately, that’s not the common practice of the K-pop idol groups and the philosophy of their record companies need to change in order for this to happen.  

             I also understand that K-pop idols don’t have a lot of control over their music, they’re more like actors who are given scripts and simply instructed to act them out.  While plenty of western artists are also “manufactured,” I feel like their record companies are more willing to give them artistic freedom and less likely to “force” them to get plastic surgeries.  I could be wrong, but I’m just simply telling you the impression that I get.  

            Not trying to argue with you here and sorry in advance if what I said offend you.  Peace. 

          • canistillhaveadream2

            Thank you for the comment. I mean, even though my latest comment was not very kindly, you gave me a very much calm and peaceful answer. Thank you.

            But the thing is: The “guilty pleasure” theory can not explain everything. If someone listens to catchy Kpop songs just as a “guilty pleasure”, why would this person visit Kpop-related sites regularly, read almost every article on them, leave comments, and sometimes even try to know every cultural thing from Korea. I mean, these people do exist even if you may say you’re not one of them. I just can not believe this is just a simple “guilty pleasure”. I would rather say it’s a “real obsession”.

            Plus, when I said, “They criticize every detail from Kpop”, I didn’t really mean it particularly “musically”. I mean, almost everyone interested in Kpop is interested in Korean culture, too, and these people are also complaining about Korea as a whole. And that’s why I kept telling you about “being specifically strict with Koreans and Korea”. I hope you remember it.

            For example, many international fans say Koreans are racists as though their countries are some kind of blessed Heaven of all human races. And I’ve always found it unbelievably ridiculous. Like a pure joke!

            Well, we’ve never enslaved any race in our over 50 hundred-year long history, and there was absolutely no race-related terrorist attack/civil war/citizens’ protest. Never. There was not even a religion-related terrorist attack/civil war, either. (I’m talking about “religion”, too, because sometimes race/ethnicity problems are actually deeply related to religion.) 

            And I do find it particularly hilarious when fans from the Western world consider Koreans as racists. I mean, hello, in your precious Western world, Asians(like myself!) are pretty much ignored and looked down on. I myself have been receiving these disgusting comments like “Ching Chang Cong” from white people on YouTube when Korean language doesn’t even sound like that. And wasn’t there an immigrants-related terrorist attack in Norway lately, was it? And still these Westerners say Korea is a racist country. What a disgusting joke!

            Well, if they’re going to keep arguing Korea is a racist country, I would say, as a Korean citizen, “Well, dear. WE DON’T NEED YOU. We never make music to please someone who’s arguing Korea is a racist country. So please just go away. Go back to your country’s music or whatever.”  

            Please understand that this site, Seoulbeasts alone, does have so many articles arguing Koreans are actually racists, and…oh, don’t forget the comments there on those articles.

            And please understand this “racist” thingy is just ONE of so many reasons that make me believe many of these international fans are pure hypocrites.

            P.S. But I hope you don’t take any parts of my words personally. And I apologize in advance, too, if my comment sounds any offensive.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            (EDIT: OMG, I thought you were “hews” when I was writing THIS comment. Now I found out you’re actually “Neal”. I hope you do understand that THIS comment was actually sent to “hews”, not you. Because I thought you were “hews”, you know what I mean…

            Or, are you guys are actually the same person using two user-names? I’m just asking. I don’t really care.)

            The thing is: The “guilty pleasure” theory can not explain everything. If someone listens to catchy Kpop songs just as a “guilty pleasure”, why would this person visit Kpop-related sites regularly, read almost every article on them, leave comments, and sometimes even try to know every cultural thing from Korea. I mean, these people do exist even if you may say you’re not one of them. I just can not believe this is just a simple “guilty pleasure”. I would rather say it’s a “real obsession”.

            Plus, when I said, “They criticize every detail from Kpop”, I didn’t really mean it particularly “musically”. I mean, almost everyone interested in Kpop is interested in Korean culture, too, and these people are also complaining about Korea as a whole. And that’s why I kept telling you about “being specifically strict with Koreans and Korea”. I hope you remember it.

            For example, many international fans say Koreans are racists as though their countries are some kind of blessed Heaven of all human races. And I’ve always found it unbelievably ridiculous. Like a pure joke!

            Well, we’ve never enslaved any race in our over 50 hundred-year long history, and there was absolutely no race-related terrorist attack/civil war/citizens’ protest. Never. There was not even a religion-related terrorist attack/civil war, either. (I’m talking about “religion”, too, because sometimes race/ethnicity problems are actually deeply related to religion.) 

            And I do find it particularly hilarious when fans from the Western world consider Koreans as racists. I mean, hello, in your precious Western world, Asians(like myself!) are pretty much ignored and looked down on. I myself have been receiving these disgusting comments like “Ching Chang Cong” from white people on YouTube when Korean language doesn’t even sound like that. And wasn’t there an immigrants-related terrorist attack in Norway lately, was it? And still these Westerners say Korea is a racist country. What a disgusting joke!

            Well, if they’re going to keep arguing Korea is a racist country, I would say, as a Korean citizen, “Well, dear. WE DON’T NEED YOU. We never make music to please someone who’s arguing Korea is a racist country. So please just go away. Go back to your country’s music or whatever.”  

            Please understand that this site, Seoulbeasts alone, does have so many articles arguing Koreans are actually racists, and…oh, don’t forget the comments there on those articles.

            And please understand this “racist” thingy is just ONE of so many reasons that make me believe many of these international fans are pure hypocrites.

            P.S. But I hope you don’t take any parts of my words personally. And I apologize in advance, too, if my comment sounds any offensive.

        • canistillhaveadream2

          1. I didn’t find your comment particularly offensive. No. But as I said, I found out big part of your long comment was actually about how shallow Kpop is while Cpop is not, and thought it was very interesting because I’ve always wondered why so many international Kpop fans so much love to criticize Kpop so harshly. I mean, I’ve been watching these Kpop-related international sites for years now (like Allkpop, Seoulbeats, Omona, Netizenbuzz, Soompi, etc.), so yeah, I KNOW you guys kind of enjoy criticizing Kpop, like some kind of leisure activities or something…

          I mean, if you think Kpop is shallow while the music from your own race/ethnicity/country is not, why do you even bother to listen to it in the first place? But please, please, please, don’t take this question personally. Because now I’m not asking you personally but asking all of those Kpop listeners who share the same idea, “Kpop is shallow.”

          And if you listen to Kpop BECAUSE OF the shallowness, then hell, I absolutely don’t see any point of complaining about it.

          So my point is: No, I never found your comment particularly offensive. But it clearly had something in it that I’ve always wanted to argue about.

          2. “Where did he mention that people should stop listening to Kpop?”

          No, I didn’t say that. 

          3. I didn’t say he is racist, either. Being nationalistic is not being racist. And yes, unfortunately, I still do believe he was very much nationalistic when mentioning about “Gangnam Style”. (And I wasn’t even surprised this time because it was never my first time to hear about his attitude towards Kpop and Hallyu. But well, whatever.)

          To be real honest, I don’t think being nationalistic is a problem. Or, not a big problem at least. Being overly/obnoxiously nationalistic is a problem. And I do know many of international Kpop fans assume Koreans are overly/obnoxiously nationalistic. Thus, I thought: “What if this guy was Korean? Would these international Kpop fans still defend him as they’re doing for Jay Chou so ardently?”

          And the answer is…NO. Unfortunately, hell, no. 

          So I was just pointing out how awfully many of these international Kpop fans can be hypocrites. 

          But since you’re arguing you’re not one of them, okay, then, I’m going to believe you, sincerely. And thank you for not specifically strict with Kpop artists, Korean people, and Korea. I really thank you.

          Because being FAIR between Korean people and your own people and between Korea and your own country would be the very first thing that I would love to ask for from international Kpop fans around the world.

          P.S. I apologize, too, if you were any offended by any part of my comment.

  • kitsukushima

    before i get into kpop i was hardcore jay chou’s fan…he can say whatever he want because he’s over kpop.he’s legend

    • canistillhaveadream2

      1. There are Kpop legends, too. So you’re saying these legends can say whatever they want about Cpop, too, just because they’re so-called legends?

      2. If Jay Chou, the SINGLE person alone, is already over the whole Korean music, the music from a country of goddamn over 50 million people (now please look, how ridiculous your argument sounds here, huh?), why did he even have to say such a thing in public? Why was he so depressed by popularity of “Gangnam Style” around the world that he had to say that Cpop artists should not do “Gangnam Style”? Do you really believe that your argument makes any sense?

      Please grow up, and please try to leave some decent comments. Your comment is basically debasing the quality of Seoulbeats to be honest.

    • canistillhaveadream2

      1. There are Kpop legends, too. So you’re saying these legends can say whatever they want about Cpop, too, just because they’re so-called legends?

      2. If Jay Chou, the SINGLE person alone, is already over the whole Korean music, the music from a country of goddamn over 50 million people (now please look, how ridiculous your argument sounds here, huh?), why did he even have to say such a thing in public? Why was he so depressed by popularity of “Gangnam Style” around the world that he had to say that Cpop artists should not do “Gangnam Style”? Do you really believe that your argument makes any sense?

      Please grow up, and please try to leave some decent comments. Your comment is basically debasing the quality of Seoulbeats to be honest.

      • ArielLM13

        First off, I feel I need to say you’re the one that needs to grow up. Second off, Korea is a Country of just barely 50 million. China is a country of well over 1 billion. In case you didn’t do the math, that’s a nintey five percent difference in population(now please look at how ridiculous your argument sounds here, huh?). 

        Jay Chou is a person intitled to his opinion, as is the person who thinks he can do whatever he wants. I would say the same for you but your comment is mean and over reaching.

        • canistillhaveadream2

          What kind of stupid math is that? 

          A ninety five percent difference means “ONE single person is over 50 million people”? Is it what you’re saying?

          Sorry, but your comment is even worse than that of “kitsukushima”.

          • ArielLM13

            I’m under the assumption you can read and are just choosing too ignore the fact the that I compared the population of China and Korea.

            All kitsukushima said was that Jay Chou was over Kpop, as in the artists which is true. As an artist Jay Chou has done more, sold more, and made more. So please stop making it sound like someone was holding him above the population of Korea. They were just simply stating a fact that Jay Chou is above them as an artist.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            No.

            If she said like, “Jay Chou is over all the mediocre Kpop artists these days combined” or something like that, I’d say, “Well, that’s possible.”

            But she clearly said, “Jay Chou is over Kpop”. And it’s totally freaking unbelievable that you can’t find any INSANE arrogance and ignorance from it.

            I mean, if you’re going to argue ONE SINGLE person is over the whole music of a country, then you should know everything about THAT music genre, right?

            Now, tell me. Do you know everything about Korean music? Do you? Like, “신중현”, “조용필”, “서태지”? Do you? These are so-called Korean legends and coming from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, respectively.

            As a Korean, I myself obviously don’t know everything about Korean music. Well, nobody can’t! So that’s why you always must be extremely careful about what you’re trying to say.

            And what if I said, “Seo Taiji alone, is over the whole Cpop music”, huh? Because according to you, this kind of ridiculously arrogant argument has nothing wrong in it.

            Well, then, fine. From now on, I’ll say, “Seo Taiji is over Cpop. Even Jay Chou.” 

            Satisfied? 

          • ArielLM13

            When Seo Taiji sells over twenty eight million albums worldwide, then you can say that. Though to date no Korean artist has ever done that.

            Also, maybe you didn’t notice but the person who wrote the comment doesn’t exactly speak perfect english.

            Still even if I love kpop more, I know that the oldest, most well respected korean artist does not beat out someone like Jay Chou. An artist beats out another when they sell more and are more critically aclaimed, which Jay Chou is.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            Lol, your comment only made me lose respect for you completely. Sorry, but this is coming from the bottom of my heart.

            Because, since when being great as an artist is about selling big, huh?

            Okay! If this Chou guy is so great, let’s just say this guy is the King of Music in human history! Like, he’s even greater than Mozart and Beethoven combined! Good for you, Chinese people!

            P.S. So you do know “신중현”, “조용필”, and many other oldest Korean musicians well enough, right? Wow, you’re like a doctor of Kpopology! You have to be a professor of it at a Korean university some day!

          • ArielLM13

            Forget it. You refuse to listen to anything I say and put words in my mouth so, bye.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            No, I listened. 

            And I realized that this guy is the King of Music.

          • http://www.facebook.com/leo.delai Leo Delai

            I’m not talking about his music.. im talking about his personality… to act that way is stupid… but you are too dumb to understand my point ….now go watch his videos and be ignorant for life… lol

          • http://www.facebook.com/leo.delai Leo Delai

            Before I read this article I tho he was a decent fellow but now, all I can see is a desperate little kid that instead of trying to make music and be happy with it, the arrogant idiot trying to tell what other artist shouldn’t do… It’s funny how some musicians (including jay) making this as a problem, a genuine artist don’t care about fame, money, you name it… all they should care about is making good music and being fine even if few people would listening to it…

          • http://www.facebook.com/leo.delai Leo Delai

            kim kwang seok owns jay chou anytime,,. sadly he is dead tho.. hehhehe

          • http://profile.yahoo.com/RUUFQCBA3PEZP7AKESBML6M2GM Neal

            “He is to Chinese pop music what SNSD, Super Junior, and Big Bang is to K-pop, combined! So who else is better suited to speak out against “Gangnam Style” and the onslaught of the Korean Wave in relation to Chinese pop music?”  I believe this is the part of the article that doesn’t sit well with you b/c you don’t get how his well-established fame lends strength to his statement. 
            First, and correct me if I’m wrong, you sound like you’re not convinced that Jay is as big as the author makes him out to be. Yes, that quoted statement is a bold one, I agree, but I can see Mark’s point given certain contexts. E.g., , I applaud Jay’s effort to incorporate traditional Chinese instruments into his music…it certainly makes him stand out as a contemporary C-pop artist…not COMPLETELY original, but still quite creative.  I’m also guessing that Mark perhaps said that he’s bigger in the C-pop scene compared to SNSD + BB + SuJu combined because:
            1. The number of years that Jay’s been around 
            2.  The fact that he’s a critically acclaimed composer and that his lyrics are thought-provoking.    
            3.  He makes his own music. 
            4. The fact that he is very successful with C-pop music. 

            IMO, it’s a little unfair to compare Jay vs these huge idol groups because they are managed very differently b/c the K-pop companies control all aspects of their artists’ music, while Jay is the boss of his own music.  Still, Mark is right that yes, Jay is very talented and he’s a legend, so I can see he’s in a good position to rally fellow Chinese artists to stay competitive.  

            The impression that I get, though, I think the CURRENT Hallyu wave is more widespread internationally than C-pop or even Jay’s music. So, it depends on what your measuring stick is, really and you can argue both ways.  Mark’s argument does NOT paint the whole picture, but it still has SOME merits.  

            “Unlike Japan, China’s market has never been friendly to foreign acts, especially one that campaigns so vigorously to install itself as a permanent fixture. Having realized the growing presence of K-pop in his native Taiwan and parts of China, Chou is utilizing his status as a leader of the industry to invoke a sense of ethnic pride in promoting Chinese pop music.” Umm, I think these sentences I quoted from the above article should be enough to explain why Jay Chou feels “threatened” by the Hallyu wave.  Chinese market is not friendly to foreign acts and Jay is a respected figure within the Chinese market, so it’s not exactly surprising that he tells his fellow Chinese artists to NOT lose to the K-pop wave in their own homeland.  I’m only giving you my 2-cent on why Mark said what he said and why Jay said what he said and hoping it makes SOME sense to you even if you still object to their statements.  I am not trying to make you agree w/ or support Jay’s expression of “insecurity” against the” threat of K-pop.”  It’d be nice if everyone can enjoy music b/c of its universality and not drag nationalism and cultural rivalry into it.  I guess with the Far East nations and other countries with rich, complicated historical interactions, it just can’t be helped, sadly.  

          • canistillhaveadream2

            “You sound like you’re not convinced that Jay is as big as the author makes him out to be.”

            1. Please. How many times should I repeat that whether he’s big or not is completely irrelevant here. I thought I already asked: “He can say whatever he wants while others can’t?”

            Why does anyone have to focus on how big he is when the problem is about what he SAID, not himself per se.

            Well, my answer would be exactly the same if he was some other famous Chinese/Taiwanese that I know well enough.

            2. This is completely ridiculously pointless that these people (including you!) are trying to EVEN convince others that he’s so big.

            I’m really awfully sorry, but I HAVE NO INTEREST in this Chou guy or Cpop. I don’t listen to Cpop. And I have no plan to listen to any of it. I’m too busy to listen to all these new released Kpop songs to begin with.

            Sorry, but this is……crazy……tbh.

          • canistillhaveadream2

            No.

            If she said like, “Jay Chou is over all the mediocre Kpop artists these days combined” or something like that, I’d say, “Well, that’s possible.”

            But she clearly said, “Jay Chou is over Kpop”. And it’s totally freaking unbelievable that you can’t find any INSANE arrogance and ignorance from it.

            I mean, if you’re going to argue ONE SINGLE person is over the whole music of a country, then you should know everything about THAT music genre, right?

            Now, tell me. Do you know everything about Korean music? Do you? Like, “신중현”, “조용필”, “서태지”? Do you? These are so-called Korean legends and coming from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, respectively.

            As a Korean, I myself obviously don’t know everything about Korean music. Well, nobody can’t! So that’s why you always must be extremely careful about what you’re trying to say.

            And what if I said, “Seo Taiji alone, is over the whole Cpop music”, huh? Because according to you, this kind of ridiculously arrogant argument has nothing wrong in it.

            Well, then, fine. From now on, I’ll say, “Seo Taiji is over Cpop. Even Jay Chou.” 

            Satisfied? 

  • kelli321

    This reminds me of the time when veteran singers Yu Quan told Chinese people to support Chinese music when accepting an award from EXO-M, the backlash from hardcore Kpop bands to them and poor Chinese band MIC was extreme. I agreed with them then as I agree with Jay Chou now.

    Supporting and strengthening their own music will help increase its quality and industry. Cpop is in fact still developing, idol singers in the mainland are almost non existent (or if they are, have very small fanbases).

    Allowing kpop to have too much influence in the developing Chinese industry detriments the quality, style and direction Chinese music has the potential to develop to.

    Sure Kpop may have its quality, but from what I see the kpop idol groups that do try to promote in China provides very little value musically but more so for entertainment purposes.

    I see a lot of readers here from other countries who had a strong disdain for their own countries music/groups/idol bands. if people gave them more support, there would be more funding for their development and maybe allow more quality groups to come out such that you wouldn’t want to “throw laptops at them”. The same applies to China’s need to support their own developing music too.

    I don’t see anything wrong with a little protectionism in the Chinese industry. Korea had and still has a lot of protectionism and support for their own music which is why they stand strong in their own country today. When the Chinese music industry is as strong as say America or Japan then they can welcome as many  “Gangnam styles” as they like and it wouldn’t make much difference.

  • kelli321

    This reminds me of the time when veteran singers Yu Quan told Chinese people to support Chinese music when accepting an award from EXO-M, the backlash from hardcore Kpop bands to them and poor Chinese band MIC was extreme. I agreed with them then as I agree with Jay Chou now.

    Supporting and strengthening their own music will help increase its quality and industry. Cpop is in fact still developing, idol singers in the mainland are almost non existent (or if they are, have very small fanbases).

    Allowing kpop to have too much influence in the developing Chinese industry detriments the quality, style and direction Chinese music has the potential to develop to.

    Sure Kpop may have its quality, but from what I see the kpop idol groups that do try to promote in China provides very little value musically but more so for entertainment purposes.

    I see a lot of readers here from other countries who had a strong disdain for their own countries music/groups/idol bands. if people gave them more support, there would be more funding for their development and maybe allow more quality groups to come out such that you wouldn’t want to “throw laptops at them”. The same applies to China’s need to support their own developing music too.

    I don’t see anything wrong with a little protectionism in the Chinese industry. Korea had and still has a lot of protectionism and support for their own music which is why they stand strong in their own country today. When the Chinese music industry is as strong as say America or Japan then they can welcome as many  “Gangnam styles” as they like and it wouldn’t make much difference.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/R5BKARJWK7NNOXYOIUSP76YJW4 Aj

    I’m a fan of Jay and when he said that about Gangnam Style I wasn’t surprised. That’s just so Jay Chou, he always say what he wants to say.Besides he said that to his peers and to Chinese people to not let Kpop overshadow Chinese pop. We can’t say he’s wrong, he’s always been proud of his heritage and it continually shows in his music. Even with all his scandals and all the mean things he said to paparazzis that he loathes so much and all the unpopular comments he made, he’s a genius musician.

  • ExoKpop

    i don’t know who jay chou is. this is actually my first time hearing him. he can say whatever he wants, but he sounds pretty arrogant to me. and to me he has some ego issues when he claims something like how he did the horse dance first before psy, calling it old-fashioned and unoriginal. um like what? that horse dance is pretty universal gesture/dance when imitating a horse ride. but psy made it funny. i understand that jay wants to keep the chinese culture and music in china. but why gotta single out psy? and pour sour sauce on Psy’s success. if people don’t want to listen to Psy, nobody is forcing them to listen to him. it’s a free world. i’m not asian but i think that Psy did some good for the Asian community in America. Psy made a history with the fact that he is the only Asian and non-Asian that ever broke into mainstream American radio stations with a non-English language song. (except Spanish but a full Spanish song is rare too) i was so freaking surprised when i heard psy’s song on radio!

    anyways, it’s great that he is the king of cpop and made his mark there. but that’s irrelevant to people who don’t listen to cpop. just like kpop is irrelevant to people who don’t listen to kpop. so i find it funny how some people here are trying to force his “greatness” on others that don’t listen to him and worse, in doing so, putting down musicality, talents, and achievements of kpop artists. u don’t have to say he’s better than so and so by putting others down to prove ur point when there’s no clear answer to it really. different strokes for different folks.

    • canistillhaveadream2

      Wow. I just love every detail of what you said.

      Yeah, it’s totally bizarre that people force his “greatness” on others who are not even interested in him or Cpop by putting down Kpop on a Kpop/Hallyu site. Could there be any more absurd, hypocritical, bizarre thing on the Earth than this?

      Anyways, thank you.

      • http://twitter.com/x3pups Emily Li

        okay then you didn’t really read the article well did you? he’s not putting down kpop or gangnam style. he is saying that the chinese artists should work on their own music instead of providing more publicity to another act. he is NOT putting down kpop; he is simply stating his opinion. his comment is in no way not arrogant or not egotistic (it’s pretty much a character trait of his), but he is not saying that everyone should drop kpop forever and hate it. jay chou wants more coverage to cpop because that is his genre and can you really expect him to support kpop? its a basic selling point: don’t promote your rival. additionally, he doesn’t want the standard kpop image to affect the quality of chinese music. much as i love kpop, it is not known for it’s originality or musical value. sure, some groups do have extremely talented vocals, but just the designated roles in a standard kpop group shows it’s lack of diversity. “main dancer” “visual”, those are some examples of why kpop doesn’t really thrive musically.

        besides, the opening act of a show promoting the success of chinese artists was a gangnam style dance. that really does not make any sense in the least. jay chou might be kind of harsh on psy, but to be fair, psy is the only kpop act with world-wide fame. other groups may have become popular, but quite honestly none of their music has made such a great impact on culture as psy has. many asian people in america do not actually find it such a great accomplishment. the reason why psy managed to find such great success was because of his strange, quirky image. he’s a larger older chinese man rapping and singing a funny song while doing a dance that clearly is not expected of someone like him. i am not bashing psy or his success; he deserves it and he’s made great history. many of my asian friends just find psy irritating and honestly his image doesn’t do much to break the stereotypical asian guy funny, smart, sidekick, awkward image that has been installed within american society. jay chou might not have a song that plays on the radio in the usa, but neither does most of kpop. he isn’t bashing gangnam style’s success; he simply wants cpop to succeed as well.i like both cpop and kpop, but the two of the mixing just doesn’t work that well lol. both china and korea are not very open and don’t take well to outsiders. if cpop were to have a major wave into the west, i can imagine that kpop idols would not be happy with that either lol. 

        • canistillhaveadream2

          “okay then you didn’t really read the article well did you? he’s not putting down kpop or gangnam style. he is saying that the chinese artists should work on their own music instead of providing more publicity to another act. he is NOT putting down kpop; he is simply stating his opinion.”

          Okay, then you didn’t really read my comments here and didn’t notice whom I was talking about. I wasn’t even talking about the article itself. I was talking about SOME COMMENTS on this article.

          Your comment is already pretty much pointless there. duh.

          (Btw, since when Cpop is Kpop’s “rival”, when Koreans don’t even listen to Cpop?)

  • http://twitter.com/noreenchekhalin noreenchekhalin

    Thanks for this great article. Make me even more respect towards Jay Chou and Chinese music!

  • http://athlieskores.blogspot.gr/ Erisa Desu

    as a European Listener I can only say that I love both kpop and cpop and I really like Jay Choo who put traditional elements in his modern music and I tottaly respect him as an artist and musician. Thank you for this article 

  • http://athlieskores.blogspot.gr/ Erisa Desu

    as a European Listener I can only say that I love both kpop and cpop and I really like Jay Choo who put traditional elements in his modern music and I tottaly respect him as an artist and musician. Thank you for this article 

  • http://twitter.com/yanaliao Sunshine ♫杰伦♫

    Couldn’t have been well said! Your article deserves a LIKE. :) thanks!!!

  • bella

    Jay Chou!!! One of the most popular Chinese!! 

  • GreyLeaves

     This was a good article to be honest. I can’t hate on what he said,  I understand where he is coming from and also he wasn’t completely putting down kpop or anything. I have to be honest, kpop for a long while has been so uninteresting to me that I have found myself going back to jpop/jrock/j-indie and I’m even listening to some cpop artists like Queen Jolin Tsai.

    • shannie4888

      Queen Jolin Tsai indeed. I love this woman. 

    • shannie4888

      Queen Jolin Tsai indeed. I love this woman. 

  • littleboyd

    Can Chinese watch youtube?

  • littleboyd

    Can Chinese watch youtube?

  • http://twitter.com/sereneione sereneione

    Great article.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • John

    Jay Chou is contradicting himself. He needs to give Psy a break unless there is something I am not sure about the Chinese and Korean history. The reason why I say he is contradicting himself is because he borrows western elements to put into his playing.

    I may not be as popular and successful as Jay Chou, but music is changing and evolving from classical, to jazz, pop elements like MJ to people that makes me rolls my eyes like Lil Wayne, Kesha, Lady gaga, etc.

    He needs to realize that he won’t be living on this earth for a while and he needs to do what he can now and just accept the way somethings are. And you never know, within many years, the Chinese market might as well be very open to many musicians and music. And he should know better since he is taiwanese and part from China.

  • disqus_Anu4IF1bdm

    He just want to encourage to create own style, not just follow the trend, and encourage support his national’s good singers. He doesnot mean not listen to other music nor he said other people’s music in not good.

  • missb

    If you’re a true music lover, enjoying music isn’t limited to just a c-pop thing, American or K-pop or whatever. Because of Youtube, the internet, people can access a diversity of music and this helps in the evolution of music. I’m a big fan of Jay Chou and I think what he does for Chinese music is great but to say k-pop is an invasion is a bit of a contradiction when alot of Jay Chou’s music does have alot of elements of R&B, hip hop (that’s asian music being influenced by American R&B artists).

  • http://twitter.com/Zhangsta Zhangsta

    I didn’t read the full article as I smelt hatred in the first few lines. Find something more productive to channel your hate, like making amends with your other bonkers Korea.

  • LOVEMUSIC4ever

    I m here to support Jay Chou, I think he is correct, I’m a Jay Chou fan and unfortunately I don’t like K-pop,even tho I’m Korean.