• Fresh Lemons

    Its not just Korea, its Asian culture as a whole that continues to use blackface as a method to use in a comedic way. I can point out several other artists on variety shows in China or Japan that have done this such as back in about 2009 or 2010 where on a akb48 variety show they blackfaced a member to show they were Michael Jackson. The problem stems from the entire continent not being self conscious of other cultures when it comes to portraying them in skits or jokes. Its due to them not being to exposed to other ethnicities  inside their own country to express to them what is right and what is wrong and this is something I am pretty sure won’t change anytime soon.

    • Anonymous

      I was going to make the exact same point. I personally know that Asians are some of the most racist people around if you know how they talk about people of other ethnicity. Then again, that’s how they talk about each other, too. Honestly, I think this is a crime that people of all races and ethnicity commit; some are just savvier about it than the others.

    • Anonymous

      I guess what bugs me is that they respect hip hop artists like Snoop Dogg. Okay, you’ve LISTENED to his music right? In various songs he exposes racism for what it is? Shouldn’t they also respect that material or at least try to learn more about it.

  • Tigana

    I just don’t get for the life of me, what’s supposed to be funny about a “black face”.  No seriously. Not even an infantile part of giggled or stifled a smile. I don’t mind politically incorrect humor as long as it is funny. But this is just dumb as fuck.

  • Stupidwisdom

    painting your skin does not = Blackface.

    • Anonymous

      What does?

      • ggoma

        It’s a specific type of acting. It’s making fun of black people by acting like a “(insert bad word)”. Black face must both be painted on and acted out in a certain manner. If they are simply being the Dream Girls with a painted face, it’s not technically “black face”, because it’s not treating them like a stereotype or making fun of them.

        Yellow-face too was popular. Again, that’s not without the malicious intent.

        • Stupidwisdom

          exactly! I thought the same thing when everyone was attacking Boom for the Stevie Wonder thing. He was not doing a racist blackface, he was doing Stevie Wonder! This happens in all most every episode of the American SNL, its called an impression. Im not defending all the “Blackface” instances on KTV of any other place. There is a difference between jabs at people and jabs at races.  

          • Anonymous

            I agree with both ggoma and stupidwisdom. 

    • meTOday

      i just feel like if a majority of black people takes  offense to someone painting their skin to look like a black person, that should be enough to let people know that its wrong.  if you know that painting your skin black will offend some one or hurt them, why do it?

    • lalala

      so much ignorance 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_LL4QDJLVFDT2RDIZYBALSE75JE angel29

    Did they cause laughter for mocking African-Americans or were they just portraying themselves as African-Americans as background to a funny situation?  There is a difference. 

    • Cherry

      Not trying to be difficult, but what’s the funny situation? 
      I don’t understand Korean

      • ggoma

        They are spoofing an awards show.

      • Anonymous

        They spoofing the movie Dreamgirls starring Beyonce and Jennifer Hudson.

  • maldita

    As wrong as it is, Korea will keep doing it because they don’t understand the deeper meaning behind it. It’s simple as that. Sure, it’s past time they change, but change doesn’t happen overnight. To them, painting their skin darker for comedic skits like this is just another way for the viewers to instantly get what they’re portraying. Dream Girls are black. If they’re going to do a Dream Girls skit, might as well paint their skin darker to go all out. They don’t mean it to be offensive because they don’t know it’s offensive. Same can be said for other Asian countries. I’m from Manila in the Philippines and if somebody does blackface, nobody would bat an eye, regardless of the fact that we’re one of the few Asian countries so immersed in Western culture. Hell, the only reason I even know of “blackface” and how apparently offensive it is is because of the outrage of international fans whenever blackface incidents happen in Korean television. What more from such a homogenous culture like Korea where people only know people of different races through what they see on TV?

    If Korea is demanded to stop doing blackface-related things, Western media might as well stop perpetuating so-called stereotypical Asians with taped slits as eyes and ramblings of “ching chong chang.” Respect goes both ways.

    • Guest

      Why aren’t they doing skits on “Caucasians”?
       
      To me it has to do with SKs thinking their living “white” is acceptable and therefore they do not want to bite the hand that feeds them.  SKs are siding with one culture or ethnic group over another.  The ignorance that is blatantly perpetuated as academic or innocent is a lie.  They can put on wigs and just tell the audience who they are imitating to teach the audiences about another culture without being offensive or derivative.  There is no excuse for this.

      They’ve chosen sides and will use the “blackface” as a way of race baiting and telling the world whose side they are on.  This is what SKs are about to me.  You can continue to coddle them if you want to it’s your choice.  I think they should be held accountable and have to explain why they lack creativeness in this regard since they have so many educated ppl in their population “supposedly”.

      • ggoma

        Not really. They don’t think of white people as better than them, despite what people might think. They do admire our paler skin tones (those of us who have them) – but pale skin has always been admired around the world since ancient times. It’s only recently that tan skin has become desired. Pale skin = rich upper class. Dark skin = working outside all days. This has little do with race, since even African people felt the same way about lighter skin African peoples being desirable. It’s thousands of years of history here. 

        As for “blackface”, if you call this blackface you are sorely mistaken. This: 
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C45g3YP7JOk is blackface. See the difference? In this particle scene they are simply acting as Dreamgirls, not using it to make fun of black people.

        Now as for Koreans, I find it really disgusting that people say that racism is a “Korean problem”.  I never saw an instance of racism against a black person in my whole time living in Korea. Nor have I ever seen a white person treated better than a black or Korean person. Foreigners, who look different than Koreans, will ALWAYS be treated like outsiders. Period. Doesn’t matter how much you know the culture or how much you speak Korean. This is just because of nationalism. It’s just how Korea sees the world. Korean Vs. Non-Korean. But they are, like any country, for the most part non-racist and very kind. There are racists and things happen that are racist in all countries. This is not a Korean problem by any means, but it just gets more attention in Kpop because that’s what you are paying attention to, instead of reading the news. Don’t assume things, because then you end up being just the same. Ignorant.

        • Guest

          Racism is not just a “Korean problem”.  I did not say it was….

          Your defense reads like a fangirl, which I am not. 

          • ggoma

             “SKs are siding with one culture or ethnic group over another.  The ignorance that is blatantly perpetuated as academic or innocent is a lie.””This is what SKs are about to me. “Do you even know how many “SKs” watched this show? Or how many “SKs” dress up in “black face”? No, but you used as your subject “SKs”. 

            I’m not a fangirl by any means. South Korea has a lot of problems, but this is one issue that gets way out of hand and is spread around by people who have never even met a person from South Korea or only have limited experience in America. 

            When I saw the Star King episode and the racism on Misuda I called it disgusting, btw, Because it was. In this case as well, I felt that it was unnecessary, so I don’t think it should have happened. But do you really want to say that “SKs” are only about “x”. Because that’s incredibly limiting.

          • Guest

            Well, I for one cannot nor will disregard their actions on SNL, SK as harmless and overblown.  That is not a “card” that I carry or a view that I ascribe too when viewing something like this material.  I’m not one that puts on rose-colored glasses when I see something wrong and call it “okay”.  They could have just had a person walk in front of the screen with a placard saying “Dream Girls” or something.  Anything other than the route they chose.  I would have cracked up because then I would have realized the joke.

            We are going to have to agree to disagree because I will never come over to your way of thinking nor you to mine.

            I just think they should have chosen another American or European target.  I hope SB posts about it when they do try their hand at it to see how it was handled.  When American SNL takes shots at other nations, or the general population, we know it.

            Peace out.

          • ggoma

            I have no issues with not liking the performance. What I disagree with is a blanket criticism of SK because of a handful of incidences. 

        • meTOday

          Not really. They don’t think of white people as better than them, despite what people might think. They do admire our paler skin tones (those of us who have them) – but pale skin has always been admired around the world since ancient times. It’s only recently that tan skin has become desired. Pale skin = rich upper class. Dark skin = working outside all days. This has little do with race, since even African people felt the same way about lighter skin African peoples being desirable. It’s thousands of years of history here. ”
          -that true for the rest of the world, but not for Africans.  since skin pigmentation is so varied in the race.  kings and queens could have been as dark as night and the villagers could have been as Chris brown light.  

          -you seem to be very offended about people labeling Korea as racist, which i can understand.  but at the same time this site focuses of Korea and Korean pop-culture, so they look at racism in Korea specifically.  the author is not saying that racism is only a “Korean thing”  we are just talking about the issue of racism in Korea.  there is racism everywhere.

          • Samimami2001

            Ditto on the African peoples liking lighter skin. I hate it when people assume that all of the world’s cultures shared Western/European ideologies before exposure via colonization/imperialism. In African nations, skin color did not correlate with class before European influence. Felt the need to emphasize…

    • Annon

      Wow, everything you said was spot on with how I feel.

      BTW Robert Downey Jr does blackface and gets an Oscar nomination but Koreans get bashed?

      This reminds me of people saying there is no white racism and no skinny shaming.

      • Guest

        Downey stated in that movie that he was “a dude portraying another dude portraying a dude” or some nonsense like this….

        • Meanie

          Actually the movie was exposing how Hollyweird will have a white person play a person of color be it asian, black and their all time favorite native american instead of the actual person of color.  There is a running joke that pretty soon you will see a white person portraying MLK (Martin Luther King) in a movie.

          • Guest

            When I mentioned “nonsense” I meant my quote as I did not think my recall was accurate on what he said and not the message behind his character.

          • Meanie

            Sorry for the misunderstanding I knew what u were talking about, I was trying to give perspective to what Annon wrote.

      • BjorkYou

        His role was a satiric take on the racism and overblown egos in Hollywood. Not the same thing at all.

        If you know your American history, the origins of blackface, how it was used to denigrate black people to justify slavery and then decades of Jim Crow, then you would understand Downey’s satiric take.

    • asianromance

      I agree for the most part that it is due to ignorance.  Unless they’ve lived in the US or in any country that is very diverse, they don’t really understand the concept of race in the social context.  However, I could have sworn that singer Tasha had spoken out against blackface.  Is Tasha just big internationally and is not very well-known in Korea?  I can’t imagine that out of the entire staff of SNL Korea that not one person has any idea of its offensive nature.  Someone should tell any show/channel that is planning on doing blackface that it is the same as Japanese celebs doing the Korean-face.  Maybe they haven’t made that connection.  And this stuff should be explained to them in terms that they understand.

    • Boo

      The fact is tho when blackface or yellow face occurs in the US, it actually gets called out and acknowledged as wrong. If we get offended when foreigners do yellow face and that annoying chingchongwhatever we should also make the logical conclusion that painting yourself black is just as offensive to another race.

      • BjorkYou

        I hate, hate that CHING CHONG and other gong sounds any time an Asian person appears on screen. Anyone remember John Hughes “Sixteen Candles”?

  • Mer

    Again?  I have to watch to the skit, to see what the deal is.    

    SN:  You might be preaching to the wrong crowd about the nastiness that is black face.  Most K Pop fans are real young (and other things)  and they don’t get why it’s so offensive.  They have a tendecy to brush these things off because it doesn’t affect them on a personal level.

  • Anonymous

    Americans call the French cheese eating surrender monkeys. 

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Shekinah-Mulkey/100001596151655 Shekinah Mulkey

      Eh? No, I don’t. Where on earth did you hear that? Please don’t generalize… –_–;

    • Guest

      I’m an American, and this is my first encounter with this offensive reference. 

      • Anonymous

        Maybe you need to educate yourself about your own culture? 

        • Guest

          What racist culture are you from to presume to educate me on mine?

          • Anonymous

            So, now I’m the racist? I never called the French monkeys. 

          • Guest

            Yes, just like all Americans in your original post.

            It reads like you hate Americans.  I hope you are not taking advantage of our generosity and living here.

          • Anonymous

            No, I don’t live in America, I do like America. I visited it once and I have fond memories of the country. Why are you calling me a hater of America?

    • Anonymous

      I’ve never heard of this reference. Nice try though.

      • Anonymous

        I think many French people know better. 

        • Anonymous

          If it’s a reference, then it is a disgusting and offensive reference. No one I know uses it, and no one should.

          • Anonymous

            I find that very hard to believe. You should read what Americans said about the French just before America decided to invade Iraq. And know you say that you don’t know anything about that? How come? I find that very hard to believe. 

          • Anonymous

            Don’t find it hard to believe. I’ve never heard that term until today. 

          • Anonymous

            I’m sorry but I don’t believe that.

      • Anonymous

        The Simpsons came up with it and it was popular when the U.S. was invading Iraq. However, I’d like to point out that it was only popular amongst that segment of people who believe that bombing the shit out of a country will somehow make them democratic and U.S. allies. The general public didn’t use it, but it was a big pop culture meme.

        • Anonymous

          Thanks for the information–I didn’t even know that, and I tend to keep up with current events. It just goes to show how many different facets of America there are. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Shekinah-Mulkey/100001596151655 Shekinah Mulkey

    My definition of black-face is when a performer dresses up as the stereotypical image of a black person, which, back in the 1800’s, were very exaggerated. But to be honest, I’m not really sure what to think of this. I’m not particularly angry, but I’m not amused.

    I’m reminded of one of the America’s Next Top Model seasons where the models were given a challenge to do “a type of black-face” shoot which Tyra received backlash for. Strangely enough, I didn’t see it as black-face at all. Double-standards maybe?

    One must come to terms that things are different in other countries–although it doesn’t mean you have to be okay with it. I’m all for jokes about black people, but this…

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kristin-Oldfather/575375784 Kristin Oldfather

      I feel there is a difference between art, in photographs, art pieces, illustrations, compared to say… comedic skits on tv. 

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Shekinah-Mulkey/100001596151655 Shekinah Mulkey

        Yeah, I agree with what you’re saying. I’m usually pretty laid-back about this kind of stuff, but this is strange.
        Part me is curious with how many people in Korea are exposed (perhaps not the correct word) to blacks (in everyday life). This may not be that much of a big deal over in Korea. ^^;

    • S.S.

      That’s interesting. I looked it up – the Tyra Banks thing – and that’s apparently where this article’s image came from. Although to her credit she did try and promote diversity albeit it was a double edged sword and ended up promoting stereotypes at the same time but the sentiment was there. It was like racial mash-ups. The article I read also had a note about a vogue shoot that had a blonde model do blackface again for diversity, but had maybe one black model in the whole magazine.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Kristin-Oldfather/575375784 Kristin Oldfather

    There needs to be a video where an Asian does blackface and have a bunch of Black People walk up and start making fun of all the Asian stereotypes. And then the whole kpop community needs to spam the fuq out of these companies and anywhere else to get any kind of recognition in South Korea on this issue. 

  • Boo

    Korea just does not know how to reciprocate.

    In other words, they export their stuff and expect other countries to respect the crap out of them and their culture. What with all that insanity with celebs pronouncing kimchi the japanese way rather than the Korean way (in japanese tv mind you) and etcetera. They get all hot and bothered over that measly issue and they don’t even bother weaning themselves out of their prejudice. Of course I’m making a generalization but the fact that this is on tv, enjoyed by the public, with no backlash other than from us international fans speaks a lot about the Korean consciousness.

    You may argue that they do not know that blackface is wrong but if you think hard enough you’d realize it’s the equivalent of a white girl doing the chinky eyes and speaking in gibberish as an imitation of Chinese.

  • Annon

    They arent making a skit about being black. They are making a skit about Dream Girls, who are black so they paint themselves to portrait that.

    Im pretty sure those that are laughing arent doing it because they are painted black but because of the skit about Dream Girls.

    Stop jumping to the racism mindset everytime someone does a stereotype joke or something.

    • Cherry

      I don’t remember the author calling anybody out on racism. I only read about insensitivity

    • Anonymous

      Yeah. Hence the braids. (sarcasm).
      I read about insensitivity too.

    • Boo

      Why? Is the Dream Girls funny? Is singing and dancing a joke? 

      They are clearly laughing at something and it’s not any of the things you pointed out.

      • ggoma

        They are making fun of award shows and the acceptance speeches because it’s award season in Korea. (And musical performances are apart of that) But obviously, without knowing the Korean language you assume they are laughing specifically at the Dream Girls or black people in general not noticing that they were laughing at the KOREAN people doing satire of KOREAN people before and after just as much. 

        • Boo

          Why don’t they perform a kpop song then if it’s so funny to satire themselves? 

          Dreamgirls was a performance tho and not an acceptance speech. They laughed at the speech and they laughed at the performance and they laughed after that. They STILL laughed at the performance. 

          Whatever the reason, blackface still ain’t funny.

    • lalala

       Racism is racism stop excusing it. 

  • Anonymous

    I remember this! I wondered the SAME thing, but the nomination was from it being so very satirically done. It WAS done in humor but in a way that teased blackface? Like Inception it was a joke in a joke in a joke, if that makes any sense. And in the movie he surgically had his skin darkened to portray a role via method acting.

    • Anonymous

      i don’t even know why this is right here? it was in reply to the robery downey jr. comment. From he did blackface for Tropic Thunder.

  • Andi

    I see blackface as a double standard. When the Wayans brothers dressed up as white girls in White Chicks, no one criticized them for essentially doing “whiteface”. I’m not saying that blackface can’t be an offensive thing, but I also think that political correctness has taken a turn for the ridiculous. People need to stop getting so butt-hurt about every little thing. It’s NOT that serious. (Mind you I’m not white, but a homosexual hispanic, so I know very well what racism and discrimination look like)

    • Anonymous

      Andi, I understand what you’re saying because I’ve heard his complaint before. However, I will break it down for you. 
      America is a society in which blacks and whites are economically, politically, socially, and historically disparate. Blacks have not had the same experience in America as whites, and still do not. There is still institutionalized racism that continues to oppress blacks (and by institutionalized racism, I mean blacks being rejected loans to build businesses when they have the same credit as whites, or blacks being denied jobs because the name on the application is Tyrone Jones–yes, it happens!)

      All of this continues to reinforce the subjugation of black people. So when you have a subjugated group and you further subjugate them by putting on blackface and perpetuating negative stereotypes–it’s not only hurtful, but it’s also dangerous to how the institutionalized world sees blacks. There are real world consequences when blacks are perceived as irresponsible and foolish.

      But when the Wayans brothers dress up as white girls, there are no repercussions. Whites will still get their loans. Whites will still get their jobs. Whites will still be on the top of American social hierarchy. I apologize that I can’t go into depth more, but I encourage you to read up on this stuff. It’s more than I can explain in one post.

      • Andi

        First of all, I’m a third year Socio-cultural Anthropology major, so I am in no way ignorant of the history of discrimination. And I’m sorry, but I simply don’t agree with your viewpoint. Progress is based solely on the individual. My parents are Mexican immigrants, so trust me, I understand what it’s like to be discriminated against and stereotyped by the general media. However, I ignored that and focused solely on my studies. Now here I am, a Junior at one of America’s top universities.

        My point is, there will always be people who discriminate against you and stereotype you unfairly, does that mean that you should let it affect you? Of course not. Does that also mean you should take every little thing as being a direct offense to yourself? Hell no. People will ultimately judge you based on your achievements and the type of person you have grown to be.

        It’s silly to perpetuate these things by letting them bother you. In my opinion, political correctness has ruined the individual. What happened to having tough skin and brushing silly ignorance off? Besides, it’s not as if this skit was attempting to offend anyone, so why pay it any mind? People need to learn how to relax every once in a while and spring into action when issues that are actually important arise.

        • Anonymous

          I agree with you about working hard. My parents are African immigrants who were also discriminated against, and I also worked hard to graduate from a top university. I can relate with you totally.

          However, I was just responding to your comment about the Wayans Brothers and wanted to give background information why the White Chicks argument is not a strong one. 

          It’s not the depiction that bothers me (and others) as much as the consequences of these depictions. For example, if gays are depicted in the media as sexually deviant, a consequence of this is that people would not want gays around their children. You can’t just brush that kind of discrimination off. If blacks are depicted as irresponsible in the media, a consequence of this is that they won’t be trusted with jobs. If Mexicans are depicted as all illegal immigrants in the media, then a consequence is getting pulled over and asked for papers (at least in Arizona). You can’t just brush those off. 

          Anyway, I see your points and agree with a lot of them. I just hope you see the points I’m making as well.

          • Andi

            Of course I do, and I agree with some of them as well. We just have slightly different views of the same issue, but there’s never anything wrong with a little dialogue.

            I don’t know about you, but one of thing things that pisses me off the most is how one’s very own demographic perpetuates their own stereotypes. Take for example the gay community; if you don’t love Glee or worship Lady Gaga, or if you don’t love to go to gay clubs every weekend, they automatically label you as weird or hating your own community. I just can’t help but loathe popular gay culture at times. I think before any serious changes can be made in regards to human rights, a community has to reevaluate the image they themselves are portraying.

          • Anonymous

            The “You’re-making-everyone-else-look-bad syndrome.” LOL I agree 100% with your sentiment. Trust me lol 

          • ggoma

            Exactly. I agree 100%. 

        • Guest

          I beg to differ because the SNL franchise is all about a “wink and a nod” at those targeted by the skits…

      • ggoma

        What about white people who can’t get into a college because some minority person needs to fill a quota? Is that not racism? Why aren’t minorities upset about that? 

        This is not the 1960s. If you think racism is bad now, you should have been around then. Racism lingers on because of the older generations but as soon as they are gone and there are more interracial marriages and children, racism will start to become obsolete, really. Even now, whites are minorities in some areas. 

        I abhor all racism personally and I will defend anyone against it – white, black, yellow, red, brown, etc. But I think people do take it too far at times – just because someone is born white doesn’t mean they will automatically have an easier life and just because someone is born as a minority doesn’t mean they will automatically be discriminated against. And if someone faces racism, it doesn’t mean that a white person won’t be judged on some other factor based on their appearance. Everyone has something to face just because of how people look at them.

        • Anonymous

          I know what you mean ggoma, about people taking cries of racism too far. I agree with you about that. 

          I am a black girl, and when I got into one of the top colleges in California, only 95 other black people had gotten accepted (half of them were athletes!) out of 8,000 new students. Although I’d worked hard to get in people would still snicker behind my back and say that I’d gotten in because of affirmative action, which doesn’t even EXIST in California. Do you want to know who benefits most from affirmative action and quota filling? White women. 

          I, too, abhor all racism and discrimination against everyone–but just because we abhor it doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. 

          • ggoma

            I definitely agree it still exists, but not on the institutional level – minus Affirmative Action. I definitely have seen people of all races be affection by it. 

            But if it didn’t exist, no one could snicker right? 

            To me Affirmative Action (or the assumption of it being used) equates minorities to merely a number, which really pisses me off. And you are right, it doesn’t help, but it still put racial tension on people when it need not exist. 

        • Anonymous

          Minority quota being racist? LOL. More like the government trying to compensate for their ancestors’ atrocities against other groups of people.

          I live in Canada, and here we also have reserved spots for Aboriginal students. Aboriginals also pay for items tax-free, as well as some of them are qualifed for tax exemptions. 

          Why? Because the Canadian government is paying for what the white Canadians did to the First Nations people in Canada back in the 19th century.

          Canadian Aboriginals were driven off their lands and put into “reserves”; they were made to abandon their traditional clothing in favor of the clothing white people wore; their children taken away from them and put into schools that teach them the white men’s way of living from learning how to pray Our Father, eating foods that were staples in the whites people’s diet, to brainwashing them into believing that the white race is superior; and erasing many aspects of Aboriginal cultures and traditions that had endured thousands of years of oral history and story-telling…only to be prevented from being continued to be put into practice by the whites who deemed themselves the dominant race.

          Even now, many Aboriginals in Canada are still considered disadvantaged. The unemployment rates are high, they have many illnesses, and many of them don’t go to College. 

          Now imagine if they were just left alone by the whites to live on their lands and achieved a co-existence that back then, was deemed impossible since whites thought of themselves as the better race?

          Maybe then you won’t be whining about “minority quotas” and crying about racism against whites when the situation you cited doesn’t constitute racism at all. 

          Racism against whites may exist, but it still doesn’t compare to what many minority groups have suffered in the hands of whites.

          So please excuse some minorities if they don’t take kindly to other whites…it’s just that they know what their ancestors have gone through in the past in the hands of whites (probably some of your ancestors, too), so they’re not so friendly and as keen to bow and kiss white peoples’ feet.

          • ggoma

            I’m sorry, but I’m part Native American myself and I don’t think someone should have to not get equal footing with me for something that happened to people I’ve never met and never known and actrocities committed by people with grandchildren who aren’t even living anymore. I think there is only so much you can hang onto bitterness from the past before it’s silly. 

        • Boo

          Asians have the model minority stereotype so universities expect more from them. They have to be twice as smart, twice as achieving, twice as everything than their counterparts in order to achieve the same slot that say any other minority could get because people expect that from their race. I have read so many incidents of half-asians not checking the Asian box in applications because they fear the competition. It’s the universities that don’t have those boxes that have the most asians in their campuses.

          Yes being white does not exclude you from stereotypes but it assures you certain privileges. How long did it take to have a black president? Yes being white has its downsides but so far whites still dominate all those relevant high positions.

          • ggoma

            Yeah, I actually heard about Asian American students not checking Asian so that they could be considered. Again, another reason why Affirm. Action shouldn’t exist.

            But whites didn’t do that – Asian parents did it to their own kids in order for them to be successful.

          • Boo

            What is wrong with pushing your kids to be successful? Please tell me. Honestly. And don’t tell me the kids feel needlessly pressured because tbh they should get used to it for when they go into the real world.

             Parents feel the need to push their kids because otherwise these universities wouldn’t give them the time of day. Whites didn’t do it singlehandedly but they have a big influence in the current society and why it is the way it is. They are amongst the highest ranking officials and board members in universities. That is influence because they dictate who goes in and who doesn’t. 

          • ggoma

            Never said anything was wrong with that. I’m just saying that also has consequences. You can pick which ones you want to live with. There are many parenting style. I wonder though – if you compare the US and Korea (And Japan, etc) which one seems to have the highest suicide rates amongst the youth? Surely balance is always needed or kids will break. Kids need to build self-esteem in order to properly function. A degree doesn’t mean happiness or success or perfection.

            I think most parents would rather their kids be alive than successful and I’d argue that a lot of “pushing” doesn’t do so great in the self-esteem department.

            Not everyone is meant to go to an Ivy League, nor is that really a measure of success anymore because you can find success in many areas. 

            This goes for all races, though, but in Korea especially, and Japan as well, the fact that the leading cause of death for younger people is suicide says something. It’s directly proportionate to the competition there and the pushing that is done. I don’t see white people there causing any of those problems. 

            And no one forced Asian Americans to be competitive, that is from their own culture, as I suggested. Any minority could have been the “model minority”, and in Asian culture, a professional career is simply was is wanted and desired by their own culture. I think that in America, if they ended such “quotas” like Affirm. Action, that pressure would lesson, because it’d be an equal playing field, regardless of race and the Asians wouldn’t have to be competing within themselves. Race just shouldn’t be an academic issue. 

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mishka-Moncrieffe/544916778 Mishka Moncrieffe

          Despite what you may think the need for Affirmative Action is still around but also not in use in many academic institutions. Also if you knew about how acceptance for higher education go, you would know that the acceptance of a minority does not displace a member of the majority because judging is based upon looking at the best someone can achieve for their geography, economic and social standing. This creates different pools of applicants based on the statistics. 

          White chicks also did not get much criticism because there really are no resounding consequences for the white race. They continued to have “white privilege” after that movie. Please do not try to deny the existence of white privilege. Whites may be minorities in certain places but they are still the overall majority. It is also easier for them to have certain opportunities made available to them that an ethnic minority may not get.

          I am sorry but have experienced racism many times before since moving to america. I always took it exceptionally because I experienced little to none in Jamaica (everyone was more focused on economic problems). I have also yet to meet another minority (who looked like one) never experience discrimination based on looks. Many would accept being discriminated on based on a lack of merits.

          To those who say this isn’t blackface it is. There is no need for exaggeration for it not to be called racism and offensive. 

          To those who say Asia countries did not mean offense because there are ignorant, that is bullshit. They clearly have access to the means to educate themselves, sometimes it looks as if they researched on how to perform this offensive skit. If they can emanate and appreciate so many aspects of black culture shouldn’t they respect those creating it?

    • tsubomii koi

      reverse racism doesn’t work like that
      black people have been historically portayed as less than, even if the Wayne brothers did it doesn’t negate the fact white still have their privilege over others and when has white face (lmao barely ever  done) have this type of history and you scoffing this off as over PC is ridiculous

      keep trying ;) and your disclaimer at the end didn’t add to your points

      • ggoma

        I’m sorry, but white people don’t have any privilege over others and racial minorities who think that way only shoot themselves in the foot. The only answer to racism is self-actualization. But a lot of minorities are taught by their parents and their surroundings that they “can’t”. But they “can”. There are a lot more white people who are poor and disadvantaged in this country if you look at the statistics. But as long as minorities put white people above themselves, they will never get anywhere.

        Just saying. White people aren’t special. 

        • ggoma

          And this is excluding places like LA and such where a lot of racism still does happen, I admit – but again, a lot of the racism is between minorities as much if not more than from white person to minority. And it baffles me how minorities could be racist since they should know how it feels to be judged. 

          • Andi

            Amen to that. It’s sickening how often minority groups are the ones who spread racism and feed stereotypes.

          • Andi

            Amen to that. It’s sickening how often minority groups are the ones who spread racism and feed stereotypes.

        • Geekyininja7

          “But a lot of minorities (or I’m quite sure you’re speaking of blacks without saying black) are taught by their parents and their surroundings that they “can’t”. ”

          What books have you read, or minority homes have you lived in, or valid statistics that you’re quoting from, that you know in most minority (black) homes parents hinder their children’s hopes for the future? Now, being a minority myself and living amongst them and socializing, I haven’t run across this. Most decent parents, no matter the race, I think would want the best for their children and encourage them to strive to be the best they can be. Warning of a disadvantage and the trials you may endure is not the same as being told you “can’t” overcome tribulations to achieve your goals in life.

          • ggoma

            Sociology. In cases of under-priviledged minorities, parents own feelings of racial pressure and the surroundings do negatively affect peoples of minorities.

      • saylor

        …it’s not reverse racism…it’s still racism…idiot. 

  • Meanie

    First, for people who don’t know why black face is highly offensive- http://black-face.com/

    Also a good movie to watch is Bamboozled
    (2000), Spike Lee addresses the legacy of blackface minstrelsy.

    Ah yes, good ol blackface minstrels *Le Sigh*.  I’m a black woman from the U.S. so the ignorance works my nerves here and abroad, especially with the internet & books there should be no excuses.  We are supposed to be a global world now but everyone want’s to remain in their bubble (this includes the U.S.) and only take pieces of peoples culture(and it seems it’s always the offensive stuff) to suit them.

    Just like the incident with Rihanna and the Dutch Magazine”In December 2011 Jackie, called Rihanna “the ultimate niggabitch”.  Or in 2009 French Vogue doing black face instead of just using black models.

    This brings up a key component with a lot of Kpop and the Hallyu Wave and crossing over into the U.S. because these instances will be brought up.  Also it might take a celebrity to call it out just like Harry Connick Jr.did when he was on an Australian T.V. show and they did a Jackson 5 skit in black face- http://youtu.be/4DhNJsU2N6Q

    I also see where Kpop is also appropriating Native Americans (Wearing feathers and head dresses/clothing).  Native American’s don’t like that either, it’s also offensive.

    Part of the problem is what the U.S. is importing over to other countries to view (movies, tv, video’s, etc.), POC’s (people of color) and especially African/African Americans have a hard enough time here trying to get decent programming through tv and movies that’s not negative/racist stereotypes of of black people or black womanhood.

    So we still have a long, long ways to go.

  • ggoma

    Well, to be honest, in the SNL case, where are they going to find three black woman who are fluent in Korean? There is only one that I am aware that is somewhat famous in Korea… but I’m not sure it would be that easy. 

    I don’t think it’s right, but I kind of think that was a part of it. I think they should have just wrote a different section to avoid it entirely.

    As for racism, it happens in all countries. I’m kind of sick of people saying “Korea is racist”. 

    • Cherry

      The author didn’t say Korea was racist just insensitive. Considering that they lip-synced to English it really wasn’t necessary for them to get 3 black women that could speak Korean.

      • ggoma

        True about the speaking English part, I wrote this before I saw the actual clip… though they could be making fun of themselves with the whole lipsyncing thing as well. But again – insensitive = racially insensitive, even if the word race isn’t in there, the whole article is about race. Racially insensitive is pretty much a nice way of putting racism.

  • Mija

    I’m Black and I don’t get why people are so offended over this. I know the history of blackface and minstrel shows but that is not the case here. What Kikwang did was offensive because he had an afro and was eating watermelon so he was obviously making fun of black people but when Boom painted himself to become Stevie Wonder and this Dreamgirls skit I don’t find offensive because Stevie Wonder and Dreamgirls are black so they were just painting themselves to look like them, not make fun of an entire race of people. If they never painted themselves nobody would know who they were trying to imitate. 

    How many times has Dave Chappelle painted himself to imitate another race? But everybody laughs their ass off at that. When Tropic Thunder came out and Robert Downey Jr. was playing a Black soldier nobody complained about that. People need to stop overreacting.  

    • Dn

      You also have to remember that the producers of these shows and movies are white. So of course they wouldn’t complainl, they are the ones who created it.

      • Mija

        I’m talking about the people who saw the movie didn’t complain. To my knowledge there was no cry of racism over RDJ’s character in Tropic Thunder. at least everyone I know loved that movie 

    • Meanie

      When Dave Chappelle did it he was doing social commentary on white privilege and how white people view blacks, same goes for Eddie Murphy in a SNL skit- http://www.snotr.com/video/422/Eddie_Murphy_goes_undercover

      People always use tropic thunder or white girls as an excuse, just like when people Want to say the N word then get mad when they get called out on it, then turn around and say well black people say it why can’t I say it.  I didn’t know black people were monoliths and that we say, do, think everything alike.

      I’m sure some Irish folks get upset when they are always protrayed as drunks, just as some asians get portrayed as being nerds or know how to do kung fu. So to me you can’t just brush off people and tell people to stop overreacting. 

      • Mija

        I just think they are reading too deeply into it. I could see if the skit was about a random black family, where they made them seem ghetto, uneducated, and stereotypical. That would definatley be racist and worth getting upset over, but to imitate a particular black celebrity should not be offensive to a whole race of people.

        • Meanie

          I understand that people can overreact to some instances, BUT in the world we live in there are too many offensive that take place, where u do need to keep your foot down and say stop.  Also as we know black people come in all shades including white, knowing that, I still can’t wrap my head around putting on one shade of black makeup and say “Hey, look we are black people.”

    • Have a seat

      I honestly wanted to stop reading after you said, “I’m Black and I don’t get why people are so offended over this.” Do you hate yourself that much? Do the feelings of Koreans who don’t have the decency to respect your culture matter more than your identity as a Black person? 
      Another self-hating negro giving their two cents. SMH. Learn to love yourself and your culture because it’s obvious you don’t.

  • Guest

    I’ve seen a lot of stuff about the Blackface things in Korean TV, and to be honest, I’m sick of all the fuss. I’m tired of everyone complaining about how racist certain Koreans are or how racist Korea is in a whole. Some Koreans are slightly racist, but I also see that their culture is slightly ignorant on such issues.
    Like the whole fiasco with Kikwang awhile ago and his Blackface. He’s not racist. The writers aren’t racist. They’re just KOREAN and part of Korean culture is slightly racist. By complaining again and again about blackfaces isn’t going to change that fact about Korea.I highly, highly doubt the Koreans mean it to be offensive.I’m also fairly certain if they were dressing up as white people, it’d be all fun and games.

    • Guest

      Well then, they should have chosen to portray a white America in their skit first since they are so “slightly racist” as you say.  I call BS on this.

      To pick on an American minority for a skit is repulsive. The portrayal lacks of creativity in how the American artists were portrayed and cowardice for using them first.  How will they distinguish a white American to show the audience who that person is? What will be necessary, wigs, a particular style of dressing up, a certain setting….?????

    • Anonymous

      “tired of everyone complaining about how racist certain Koreans are or how racist Korea is in a whole.”

      I’m tired of having my culture reduced to nothing more than dark skin and some fucked up stereotypes. If they don’t want to be viewed as racist, than maybe they should stop doing racists things. Simple as that.

  • Anonymous

    I’m shocked speechless at how many people on this thread don’t understand what’s wrong about blackface.
    I could write a 50-page paper on why, but I’ll just say this: blacks in America have historically been regarded as fools by mainstream society. From shucking and jiving (look it up) to “yes mas’sa” (look it up) and more, blacks have been portrayed as fools used for the sole purpose of entertainment. Whites used blackface in early performance as a way to perpetuate this stereotype and. Using the “mask” of blackface, whites got on stage and acted in offensive and hurtful ways.

    So when you see the actress on this SNL skit shaking her braids exaggeratedly, that’s her performing how she THINKS black people actually are. If you don’t understand, please please do some research. 

    • ggoma

      Did you see Dreamgirls? Because they shook their hair/head and dance pretty similarly to this.

      • Anonymous

        So… we’re going for accuracy? Because none of the Dreamgirls had braids. I brought up the braids because whenever I see women doing blackface portraying black women, the braids are always the go-to accessory, and the braids are always flipped around all crazy-like. 

      • ggoma

        @Lima2pm:disqus That’s true that she should have had her hair styled differently. I will agree with you there, but I don’t think it was done intentionally to make fun of “black hair styles”. I mean, a lot of people wear braids in there hair these days. A lot of people flip their hair. I think all together, these things become insensitive, but I don’t necessarily think it was done in a particularly negative way in this specific case. 

    • Anonymous

      I agree, I don’t think any of these people (Koreans and some of the commenters) hold their nonchalant attitude out of spite, but rather simple ignorance and non-exposure to the history of the practice. Especially a lot of the younger commenters — they don’t teach this kind of stuff in school these days (I mean there’s so much to cover in history) so they don’t realize that blackface, to some populations, still to this day holds just as much stigma as say, being labelled as the n-word.

      I think some people aren’t realizing that the reason why this specific practice is hurtful isn’t simply because people are poking fun at another race and perpetuating stereotypes (people from all cultures do this in comedy) but the fact that this specific practice has an extremely extensive and hurtful history — it was popularized in the mid-1800s by whites as a mocking characterization of plantation slaves (when blacks were not allowed in the entertainment industry) and the NAACP has been fighting against this kind of practice and portrayal for a long time.

      • Anonymous

        Absolutely! Most of these issues I didn’t learn in high school, but as a college student. 

        Thank you for articulating this much better than I did. 

  • tsubomii koi

    I don’t care anymore I am just happy Kpop has stayed in the pits of youtube and tumblr since their fan-base are the worst and these comments alone show their hypocrisy in the hopes of defending the shit they idealize

  • guest

    TBH, i don’t get the big deal. Maybe its because I’m so used to racism. I mean come on you have no clue how many times non-asians do the whole chinky-eye thing with no boobs, no butt, etc. but what do people say to us? ‘come on. can’t you take a joke?’ So now personally, I don’t care. But then if the same people who offended us are now gonna get made bout blackface and call koreans racists, uhhh no. You are a hypocrite. Do I think the blackface is rude? Yes somewhat. But what goes around comes around. Have a taste of your own medicine.

    • Guest

      wow, so you’re saying that africans don’t have a history of racism as well? that they should have to deal with this so that they can know what it feels like to have people be racist against them?

      Because, just so you know, they do. And it goes a lot farther than what has happened against Asians. 
      Do you even know what blackfaces were originally used for? Do you know the cultural contexts that make them so annoying?

      It’s people like you, condoning racism as ‘justifiable’ that makes the world a sick and intolerant place. 

      • ggoma

        Do you not know about Japanese internment camps and the racism during WW2? Sure, it was a hundred years of slavery in America and then segregation and racism, but it still happened and actually NO one speaks up with the Asian American community, even though there are many spokespeople for African Americans. Fair? Maybe not. But I don’t think anyone can say x Race has had it harder. Except maybe the Jews.

    • Blah2341

      There’s a difference between making a joke between friends and doing it on national TV. 

    • Boo

      Because two wrongs make the world a better place, right? 

    • lalala

      what ? 

  • Muffin

    All the Korean Americans I know are very cool people when it comes to race, even some of the ones who were born in Korea. They got that way because they were able to step outside of the Korean “bubble” and experience diversity for themselves. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to convince anyone in Korea of this because the basis of their world view comes from a point of arrogance…”we are better than them because we are Korean”. Although it is unlikely to change anytime soon it is important to draw attention to this kind of behavior for international fans because I have to roll my eyes every time I see brown people rabidly defending their “bias” and acting like they are best friends.

    • http://twitter.com/JokoYouji Joko

      ^THIS! Yess

  • Ga

    Oh, Lord. I always find that instances such as this, rather than fostering an environment of dialogue and growth, only serve as a platform for people to air out some perceived grievance and withhold any sympahty or understanding. Rather than looking at the issue as it is, they say things like, “Have a taste of your own medicine! (because, you know, this comment will NEVER come back to haunt them**) or “Reverse racism!” Racism is racism, no reverse about it. Every individual is capable of prejudice and of being an unpleasant bigot, but, not everyone has the power to actually be a bonafide racist who can dangerously and negatively influence the lives and perceptions of the targeted group. Black face in a homogenous country such as ROK most definitely negatively influences the perceptions of the targeted group as a whole. As would yellow face in Nigeria. Neither instance is okay.

    Hey, human beings, it’s perfectly fine to call out both as completely wrong. Why is that such a hard concept to understand? Yellow face/pulling eyes, blackface, native American stereotyping, anti-semitism, Muslim/Arab stereotyping etc, it’s all uncalled for and it’s okay to sympathise with each and every group and denounce the action. Is it really that hard to be decent?

    **What’s that saying? An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.

  • SHINee52911

    Yea this blackface shit is getting old and its like their just antagonizing because after all the criticism they’ve endure because of this, they still choose 2 do it. Stupid, yes Immoral yes. Accidental, hell no. They know damn well that this is offensive but they don’t care.

  • Anonymous

    And this is why Korea will never be taken seriously in the international entertainment world.

  • Anonymous

    There is a fine line between parodying and honoring. And if one has to work hard to stay on that line to avoid cultural insensitivity so be it. Case in point, I thought SNL is a comedy show?

  • Guest

    I agree with your conclusion and I did tweet the both the accounts you linked to but I don’t agree with the rest of your article.

    1. No, Korean stations have not faced any backlash for past blackface skits. If they had, we would have heard about it, just like we heard about the backlash to Muslim terrorist skit.

    2. What does Korea’s high standard of education have to do with blackface? Blackface  originated and is specific to America. There are many countries in the world who don’t even know about blackface, much less what is offensive about it. Education and the internet age have not changed that. How many Americans are taught about blackface? How many Americans don blackface on Halloween? 2 Northwestern University students did at a college dorm party in 2009. NHL-er Raffi Torres dressed up as Jay-z with blackface this past Halloween. A group of Arizona State fans went to a football game in blackface in September. These are just a few of many, many incidents that happen in America where everyone is supposed to know blackface is racist. How then is Korea supposed to know better? There is legitimate ignorance in Korea about this and if you’re not going to teach Korea right from wrong as you said you didn’t want to, then they will continue to don blackface.

    3. There are parts of the world like Brazil where blackface is not offensive and where blackface comes from a history, artform and experience separate from that of African-Americans. So, there are people who will never get why blackface is offensive not because they are racist or ignorant but because their own experience is different.

    4. This idea that everyone should know about blackface, it’s history and why it is offensive to African-Americans is just as ignorant as the Korean entertainers who don blackface for a laugh.  

    We do have an obligation to try and teach people cultural sensitivity and Korea must learn that if it wants to spread it’s culture and norms, there must be respectful reciprocity but the “Oh Korea, not again!” or the “I’m done with this shit” approach, which is the general trend on omona for example, is not going to help. 

    • Mija

      I totally agree with everything you said. Koreans may be very educated but if they have no knowledge of African American History how can they truly know about Minstrel shows and black face. A lot of Americans don’t even know about it hence the Halloween costumes and even they usually don’t do it with the intention of being racist. 

      • Anonymous

        Where exactly did Shindong’s comment about “slave drivers” while impersonating Oprah come from?

        Are you saying that the writers of Strong Heart just came up with that kind of comment out of nowhere and thought, “Hey, that sounds so funny! Let’s include that in the skit!”? 

        Why would they even include a comment about slavery for cheap laughs if they didn’t know what it truly meant and they’re ignorant of the implications of saying someone is a slave driver?

        Did Kikwang’s skit about the watermelon just come from the writers seeing an African-American eating a watermelon, therefore they just decided that it would be fun to portray the same scenario complete with big lips, afro, and a flat nose? 

        How did they even know how to search for the stereotype of African-Americans and watermelons if they truly didn’t know anything about blackface and the mockery being made from certain aspects of African-American culture?

        See, you’ll never convince me that it’s out of ignorance that blackface in Korea is still being done. Doing blackface requires some prior knowledge about blackface and its history, hence the comment about being a “slave driver” being included.

        If Korean shows truly didn’t know, how did they decide which aspects of African-American culture, history, and physical features to exaggerate? 

        How many shows in America actually do blackface nowadays so that anyone outside of the US would think it’s funny to do the same thing? How many blogs and websites on the internet are specifically about making fun of African-Americans that they’re easy to find for other people, like Korean TV shows writers, who are looking for comedic material?

        If they don’t do any research, how can they find stereotypes about African-Americans and not encounter any information about blackface and racism in America? How do they even look for impersonation of Oprah and slave driver comments if they’re really that ignorant and have no idea of how blackface is related to racism and slavery?

        • Anon

          I learnt about slavery in America in high school history in India. It was one chapter in world history. But I had never heard of blackface until I got into kpop and the issue kept popping up. So, I don’t agree with the idea that anyone who knows about slavery would also know about blackface or why it is offensive.
           
          And this is the first time I’m hearing about African-Americans and watermelons as a stereotypical image.
           
          The stereotypes that Korean shows display are the stereotypes that have been around in modern pop-culture, literature, music for a long time. I grew up reading about golliwogs in Enid Blyton’s books and at no time did I realise how offensive that doll is. I doubt my teachers realised it because it’s so far removed from our experience. My point is you can consume and internalise stereotypes without realising it is offensive.
           
          There are Korean rappers who use the word “nigga” in the way African-American rappers use it and I doubt they can even comprehend what a loaded word it is and why it’s different when Jay-z uses it. They haven’t done any research about it.  They’re simply imitating someone they think is cool.
           
          Having spent most of my life outside of America, I can tell you the stereotypes you’re referring to are very common and don’t come from research but from consumption of American pop-culture without any real understanding of that pop-culture. That doesn’t make it less racist but a lot of that racism stems from ignorance.

        • Mija

          All I’m saying is I learned about slavery all through elementary school and HS but I never learned about minstrel shows and the history behind black face and why it is offensive until I was in college and even then it was briefly discussed. So it is possible to be educated about slavery and racism and have no clue about the offensiveness that is blackface

          • lalala

            like really common sense is that common is it. It common sense to know that if someone impersonated you in a derogatory manner you’ld be offended. Doesn’t take a genius or a history class for someone to figure that out. 

      • Guest

        …If they don’t know about blackface, why the fuck are they doing it in the first place?

        Korean idols and comedians impersonate each other all the time. People dress up as Dara or Lee Hyori but don’t go through the trouble of putting on bronzer or whiter face make-up to do it. Yet, when impersonating an African American group, they pile on the brown make-up?

        And furthermore, the incident on Star King doesn’t sit straight with a lot of people either and NO ONE can claim ignorance on that. The entire world knows about the conflict going on in the Middle East and Leeteuk, Kang Ho Dong, and whoever the hell else was on that show chose to say things that weren’t true and incredibly ignorant of another country’s culture and traditions.

        For what? To make their audience laugh.

        • ggoma

          The Star King one still upsets me, frankly. 

      • lalala

        ohh please the don’t know excuse. Its not like we live in the dark ages or middle ages where people can’t get access to information. This excuse is getting old fast. Korea would be the first to throw a fist if people impersonated them in a derogatory manner. 

    • http://twitter.com/clazzigirl BoBGirl

      “Blackface originated and is specific to America ” 
      Omg thank you ! I mean I understand why people are offended and all but you can’t expect people from other countries to know about this because, contrary to what American people may think, American history isn’t part of every other countries’ history…

      • Guest 2

        Just because it originated in America doesn’t make it okay for other countries to do it. People all over the world throw around the word “nigger” which originated in America, too.

        Don’t use the excuse “it’s not part of my country’s history” as a reason to be ignorant about shit.

        • Guest

          Who said it’s okay? And how is that an excuse though? If you don’t know, you don’t know. If you learn about it, know it’s wrong and still do it, that’s something to be riled up about. But if you have absolutely no knowledge of it or have a completely different experience in your country, then how on earth are you supposed to know it’s offensive?

          But I guess you know everything about every country’s culture and history, right?

          • Guest

            So the SNL, SK producers do not have any knowledge about the American culture they are bashing?  Right…..

            I still think picking on a foreign minority group is COWARDICE.  Why not choose the majority of that nation’s group?

            If there is a KPop backlash from international artists and producers in ceasing collaborations and speaking out against this more assertively, ROK has no one to blame but the man in the mirror. 

          • Guest

            because there is no minority group in that nation? korea is the world’s most homogenous nation and that definitely factors into how they understand race.

          • Guest

            ROK does have a small minority group based on my “research” through reading their newspapers.  Stop lying to defend the indefensible actions of this skit by SNL, SK.

            They need to educate themselves if they are so impoverished socially in spite of being the most “educated and wired populace” touted by their press no doubt because this is blatant.  There is not excuse for the generation that put this medium out.  The senior producers were probably educated in America. 

          • Guest

            and which minority group is this?

            idk which world you guys live in but it’s not the real world. the idea that is a defence of blackface is so wrong and the idea that everyone on the internet is automatically better educated about the us is too,

          • you’re an idiot

            I DON’T THINK YOU NEED A HISTORY CLASS TO KNOW THAT MAKING DEROGATORY COMMENTS OR DEGRADING ACTIONS TOWARDS AN ENTIRE RACE IS WRONG.

            Sorry. I thought it was common sense. My bad.

          • Guest

            isn’t common sense to first know it is wrong? that your comment is derogatory? do you honestly think people all over the world automatically look at blackface and think it is offensive? then you need to take world history and culture classes. and maybe travel outside america.

          • Guest

            We are talking about ROKs here.  Koreans are constantly living in this country and flying back so I think the ignorance argument does not work.  This generation is educated. 
             
            Therefore, why is it wrong to expect that they would have received some cultural assimilation and appreciation from others in the countries they were educated in vs thinking themselves the “honorary whites” or better than the natives?  Btw, that Affirmative Action plan has expired….

          • Guest

            you need to read some korean political history. do you know when korea became a democracy and actually became an economic power? what korea was like in the 1980s and 1990s. koreans are constantly living in the us? really? do you have some stats for this? and does everyone who lives in the us automatically assimilate?

            the amount of ignorance about korea in this post is astonishing. do you really believe everything you see in kdramas?

          • Guest

            Based on the news articles about ROK, I have learned about its history.  Thank you very kindly.

            Me and my husband will not spend another dime financing this country’s ‘brand” in the US or overseas by visiting or buying another kdrama.  We don’t like Kpop but I was beginning to like some of the musice put out by solo and indie artists, but all bets are off…..Money talks.

          • Guest

            good for you. i guess you learnt everything about korea from the internet. 600 years of history and culture. would you like a gold star? it’s a pity they didn’t use the internet as well as you did to learn everything about the us.

            and if you are going to stop giving money to kpop, why on earth are you still debating this? you’ve made up your mind. so, goodbye and goodluck with giving your money to programming that doesn’t have a jot of racism against any race in it. i’m sure disney and sesame street will put your dollar to good use. oh wait, they’re racist too. at least the articles i read on the internet told me that.

          • Guest

            yes because everyone with the internet is googling blackface. the arrogance coupled with the ignorance of some of you guys in this post is reaching korean levels of socio-cultural stupidity.

            america is not the centre of the world and not everyone is going to know everything about it. and not everyone is going to give a fuck.

            if they don’t give a fuck, then it’s up to us to make them care. but by sitting in the us and constantly expecting people to care is not the way it’s going to work. but simple idea seems to be so difficult for some people to grasp that it’s easier to accuse people of defending blackface.

          • Ushio

            Shame on you for trying so hard to defend this. The fact is, Korea has a negative view of African Americans in general to BEGIN WITH, so the fact that they do these types of things for “fun” (blackface, and mimicking stereotypical MINSTREL characteristics) shows how insensitive and purposely offensive they can be. You all need to stop making excuses. There’s no reason for them to continuously target blacks like that for their entertainment. It’s sickening.

          • Guest

            omg i can’t with you guys anymore. this is not excuse, neither is it forgiving it.

            yes, they have a negative opinion of african-americans. and they get that negative opinion from the popular culture they consume. and they don’t just target black people. have you ever watched a korean variety show? do you know how many races and ethnicities they’ve made fun of?

            trying to add context is not excusing blackface. shame on you for jumping to conclusions and not being able to see past your own experiences. just because someone doesn’t understand something doesn’t it make it okay to do it but it does makes it easier to understand why they do it. that is all.

            blackface is still offensive. and the koreans will continue to do it until someone tells them to stop. but nobody hear wants to do that. everyone wants to go on and on about why it is offensive. why hasn’ there been one petition to any broadecast station before this? not one. the arabs and other muslims got together and got the tv station to apologise. but nobody has ever apologised for blackface. because nobody has never even tried to tell the stations why it so wrong.

            all you guys seem to be doing is accuse people of defending blackface.

            i’m done. keep feeling like the entire world is against you.

          • Guest

            A petition is good so is tweeting this and not buying their products.

            I do not “consume” SK variety shows as I have no time for that form of entertainment preferring those in my own country.  I do not need to know everything about their celebs not having fallen prey to “fandom” on that level in the US so why would I for a foreign country’s…..

          • Guest

            and have you seen a single one of the so-called defenders of blackface say that a petition is not warranted? or that we should not tweet? so what really are you arguing about? that someone who knows more about korea actually dares to explain possible reasons for why this is happening?

            you say you don’t consume south korean shows and yet you seem to know everything about racism in korea and automatically dismiss everything that doesn’t match your pov.

            how dare you shame someone else for daring to look beyond the skit and delve a little deeper into the cause. how dare you call someone racist without even bothering to understand their argument? how dare you accuse them of racism without knowing who they are or where they come from or what their experiences have been? your responses smack of american/western arrogance and that’s just as bad as korean ignorance and i have little patience with either.
              

          • Guest

            Yes, I am assuming that some of those involved with the production of SNL, SK were educated abroad.  My bad.  You can prove me wrong, but let’s not go the “Tablo” route.

        • http://twitter.com/clazzigirl BoBGirl

          Hm sorry but I’ve never heard the word “nigger” outside of America (excluding the internet)… It’s not an excuse but do I expect Americans to know about the French concept of laicity ? Hell no, so you’ve got to be considerate when it comes to this kind of thing. 
          Most of the commentators here are American (those who are not are the one who can’t understand what’s so offensive behind the blackface concept) so of course it’s common sense FOR YOU that blackface has a historical and offensive meaning. By no way I’m trying to minimize the reality of the blackface concept. Anyway, do you know why “people all over the world throw around the word nigger” ? Because America pretty much overflows them with movies/series, music and other cultural medium which also carries American deep cultural concepts. Analysis and knowledge about American history aren’t included in these cultural medium so yeah non-Americans take them as they are without thinking much about it (which isn’t excusable but that’s reality).

          • Guest

            That still doesn’t address the fact that people are claiming ignorance as an excuse to throw around derogatory words and doing shit like blackface on national television.

            It takes a special kind of Asshole to use that as an excuse.

          • Guest

            nobody is using it as an excuse ffs. it’s perspective. a perspective that is non-american and seems to fly over every american’s head. is it so difficult to understand that people outside america just don’t get why it’s wrong and will not get why it’s wrong until someone explains it to them? especially when it is like this. this not the kikwang situation or the boom situation where they not only darkened their skin but also exagerrated their features and costume. here, a korean will look at this and say hmm…looks like that movie beyonce was in.  

            there is no excuse for it and it is never not offensive. but if it’s not pointed out and nobody tells them why it is so offensive, they will never get it.

            i don’t understand why this is so difficult for americans to grasp. are you guys really so isolated that you think the world’s most homogenous nation that has only seen an influx of non-koreans (other than american soldiers)in the last 20 years and who are not taught much american history and certainly not about blackface would automatically think painting one’s face black is offensive? are you guys really that naive about other countries and cultures? or do you really believe that the internet means everyone is sitting and googling about history and cultures and anthropology and not porn? can you really not see your own ethnocentrism?

          • Boo

            Do they not have the capability to put themselves in other people’s shoes? Do they not get offended when other races mimic their chinky eyes and accent? Because they do. They get offended but they do not stop to think that it is exactly as offensive if they paint themselves black.

            It does not have to involve research so much as common sense. I ain’t even American. I got offended as hell when Lee Da Hae mimicked how she thinks Filipinos speak English. It was stupid and insensitive and entirely inaccurate and tbh Koreans go here to learn english so she really had no right to mock considering their own engrish failings. I get offended by these things that’s why I am sensitive when it is done to other races too. I don’t stick to old prejudices just because everyone is doing it.

          • Guest

            this is a serious question. how old are you and have you ever been to any country other than your own?

            what you call common sense is not common at all. i don’t know why this is so difficult to understand. do you think race relations are the same everywhere? or that rights of minorities are at the same state everywhere? or that korea even has minorities?

            if you have the common sense to see that this is offensive, good for you. unfortunately, it’s not that simple. and unless people are going to help teach the koreans why this offensive, nothing is going to happen.

          • Guest

            The education should have come from this generation of US educated SNL, SK producers.  I know someone was educated abroad and knew the meaning behind the blackface. 

            I as an adult child can communicate with my parents about the dangers of archaic thinking to push them in the direction of healthy mindsets and living.  My mother lives in a retirement community and she is racist.  We are constantly communicating with her about interacting with those outside her race and to see a person as a person not a race.  We go back and forth on this issue with her and it’s painful because we can hear it in her voice as she cannot imagine her children not siding with her….Therefore, some of my siblings have given up, but some of us continue the dialogue because we know there are bad people everywhere but not a race.  History has taught us not to look down on ALL Germans as Nazis or ALL ppl of brown descent as illegal.  It’s natural and “lazy” to blanket a race with a false label, but it takes work not to do so and deal on an individual basis.

            The producers of this show in my opinion missed a golden opportunity to take on this discourse with the ROK older and younger viewing audiences.  They fell back on default and got lazy….I am not dismissing this as “they did not know defense”.  This generation is highly educated and knowledgeable about other cultures since they come here and live among us….I refuse to believe that they are immature in their thinking. 

          • Guest

            this is all based on the assumption that this show’s producers are educated abroad, which there is no proof of as of now and that they are interested in a discourse about race, and certain blanket statements about this generation and where they live and are educated. you’re talking as though every single korean person under the age of 25 has lived and worked in the us at some point or jets off to the us every weekend. do you realise what a small minority in korea can and does so this?

            if you spent a single day in korea, you would realise every one of your idealistic statements about this generation and their education is wrong. you can believe whatever you want but in doing so you are being ethnocentric and refusing to look at anything from anyone else’s point of view. you are relying on inetrnet research, assumptions and your own experiences to judge what it is like to be korean in this day and age in korea. that shows your naievete and ignorance. and in many ways, your arrogance.

            the newest commentator on this article linked to an interview with an indian professor who took his case of racism to court. that was the first time in the history of korea that racism has been seen as a criminal matter. this happened in 2009. that’s just over 2 years ago. that’s not an assumption or a made up statistic. that’s fact. till 2 years ago nobody had seen racism as criminal. despite all these people who are supposedly educated abroad and live abroad. that’s says more about the state of racism in korea today than any one of your assumptions.  

          • Guest

            cannot reply below but why don’t you do what everyone in this post is saying koreans should do and google it?

            but to make your life a little easier, the show’s headwriter, director and host of weekend update jang jin has not been educated abroad. at least none of his bios mention it and we all know how much koreans love to talk about foreign education.

          • Guest

            btw i’m sure you have a lot to say about fred armisen’s blackface on snl when he plays obama.

          • Guest

            sorry the reply below about fred armisen was meant for the person talking about the us-educated cast and crew of korea’s snl.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with much of what you said. I specifically like what you said about differentiating between ignorance and racism. They’re not the same. In the context of the SNL skit, I think it’s ignorance, not racism. (Ignorance doesn’t mean you’re stupid, just that you don’t know about something).

      Also, you mentioned Brazil–I didn’t know that blackface was more accepted there. I do know however, that Brazil has a huuuuge black population whose experience there is similar to the one in America. 

    • ggoma

      Thank you. People act like America is completely innocent and that SK is like full of racist running around hating on black people. Which is entirely false and these kinds of posts, frankly, feed into the people who want to make blanket statements about how lowly SK really is (while they still are obsessed with Kpop). It sickens me. There are real issues in SK, and to be honest, I don’t think this is one of the ones that really need to be addressed most often because it’s the most rare of the major issues there and yet bitter expats and people who don’t even know Korean culture or history outside of Kpop and dramas act like they know it all and condemn the whole nation.

  • yousupportblackface

    1) Probably because people like you keep making excuses for them. 

    2) I
    really don’t understand why you’re providing recent examples of
    Americans doing blackface. And those people who wear blackface are
    still racist. Well, if you’re just going to copy what you see
    Americans doing without doing research about it, shame on you. It’s
    still offensive. Plain and simple. Why don’t YOU go and teach them
    why blackface is wrong? Oh, right. You’re not included in the group
    who would be offended by blackface ANYWAY. Why should you care,
    right? You’ve probably even worn blackface a few times. Haha, it’s
    all good fun, huh? No.
    3) BLACKFACE IS OFFENSIVE. They do it in Brazil? Well, Brazilians are
    engaging in a racially inappropriate act. Whether they know it or
    not doesn’t change that. UNDERSTAND? The history of black people within certain countries around the world is different, but the discrimination they face is NOT.  Come up with a better argument than ‘that’s
    their culture’.

    4) “This
    idea that everyone should know about blackface, it’s history and why
    it is offensive to African-Americans is just as ignorant as the
    Korean entertainers who don blackface for a laugh” SOUNDS A LOT
    LIKE the “Well, you are racist for calling me a racist” argument
    racist people give. Just saying. You might want to work on that. 

    And you sure are working hard to defend blackface. I can’t help but think that you actually support them doing it. Hmmm.

    • Guest

      1. if you read all that and think i support blackface, you need to work on your reading comprehension.

      2. did i say they were not racist? my point was blackface continues to occur in the country where blackface originated, where people should knonw about its racist history. if it still occurs there, then why is it suprising that it would occur in a country thousands of miles away where they have no clue about what it really stands for. as for me wearing blackface. yes, i do. it’s my natural skin colour and is not limited only to my face.

      3. no, brazilians are not racist and they’re not engaging in a racially inappropriate act. they’re engaging in an act that is specific to their culture, country and history and one that includes their black population.

      this is from wikipedia because it was the most concise source –

      Maracatu de nação (also known as maracatu de baque virado: “maracatu of the turned-around beat”) is an Afro-Brazilian performance genre. Maracatu cearense is Fortaleza’s variant of the maracatu de nação. The use of blackface in maracatu cearense reportedly stems from Fortaleza’s mostly white and caboclo demographic, and its small black population (4.4%) (IGBE 2008), which effects a situation where mostly white and brown bodies end up performing a traditionally black expression of Brazilian Carnival. Blackface in this context is intended to pay homage to the African slaves’ contribution to Brazilian civilization and is not viewed as a racist expression (compared, for instance, to the blackface minstrelsy of the United States, which parodied black speech and character). In fact, some maracatu cearense nations are actively involved in racial equality and black consciousness initiatives in Ceará. Among these is Nação Iracema, founded in 2002 by Lúcia Simão and William Augusto Pereira, heads of the first black family in Fortaleza to direct a maracatu nation (current as of 2009). Lúcia Simão also founded Ceará’s first black consciousness movement in the early 1980s.[2] This consciousness of racial equality operates through maracatu ceraense performance in part as the continuation of Ceará’s historical identity as the first region in Brazil to abolish slavery, in May 1884 (the rest of the nation followed suit in 1888).

      4. the ignorance you displayed in your post is the same as the article’s america-centric notions and the incidents of blackface in korea.

      • still defending it, huh?

        1) You need to work on your obvious lack of respect for the feelings of black people who find this offensive. You show it every single time you defend blackface. Then again, why should you care, right?
        2) Oh. Actually, I’m sure MOST of the people who do blackface in America have some clue it’s wrong. Just because they CHOOSE to do it doesn’t mean they don’t know that. Most racist people don’t care about the feelings of the people they’re offending anyway.You have people who will dress up as Native Americans for Halloween too. Why do they continue to do it? Because most of them just don’t care. These are the same people who think racism is over because the US has a half-black president. I’ve experienced them irl to know that.3) There is racism in Brazil though. Therefore, there are people in Brazil who are RACIST. And just because they don’t acknowledge it as racism doesn’t mean it isn’t. http://www.vernonjohns.org/plcooney/brazil.htmlOh, and I read that the first time it was posted on omntd. 4) Of course, I’m ignorant for not being able to understand Koreans doing blackface. Oops. My way of thinking is too American. I’m done though. See you in the next post about blackface with your statistics and paragraphs from wikipedia. I’m sure we’ll meet again.

        • Guest

          Still haven’t worked on your reading comprehension, huh?

          1. I am not defending blackface. But you certainly seem to know more about what I feel, say, think and do than me. So go on believing what you want.

          2. I don’t understand this comment. Of course, Americans know it’s offensive. They should know. It’s part of their history. Koreans don’t know it is because they don’t have a clue about it’s history. 

          3. Nobody said there is no racism in Brazil, I was referring to blackface and blackface is not the only facet of racism. But the blackface practiced in this particular artform is not racist. At least, Brazilians don’t think and since it’s country, their culture, their artform, I will take their word for it. 

          3. Nope. you’re ignorant about me because your initial point was specifcally referring to me and not Koreans and blackface, was it not.

          Yes, I’m sure you will continue to dismiss everyone else’s experiences of race in other parts of the world because they do not match your own.

  • Nabeela

    this is a very interesting argument to make, especially since blackface was an American borne theatre act created when racial segregation was still ingrained in American society. obviously, however, blackface isnt used as it was in past history, and too see in use by an asian society in contemporary society is just offensive, more actually just weird.

    i dont really know how to approach this topic though. 

    technically we americans make fun of nearly every race. i mean, every good stand-up includes a bit on racial commentary and pokes fun at stereotypes, so in a way, to Koreans, i can see how that is kind of the same thing. its just funny to them. what if they were to find out about the jokes south park makes about asians, or the jokes many comedians have about asian culture? i’m sure they would be just as unhappy as we are with blackface. but its entertainment. we need to look at this relatively.

    i guess the only difference that can be brought up here is that american entertainment really doesnt single any one race out–TV and stand up usually contains content everyone can relate and laugh about. i mean, south park, while hilarious as shit, is still largely satirical and offers a lot of social commentary in a very ironically intellectual way. 

    i dont like blackface, specifically because of its historical connotation in america. another thing i’m surprised about, though, is how Hallyu is going ape at the moment–shouldnt entertainment, especially idols, be more sensitive to who they’re parodying then?

    ….. such a heavy topic to discuss really

  • Capri08

    Jeez yet again they do this, it’s be coming really annoying. Why is it every time they want make fun of a race it’s always the people of dark skin/Africans Americans (Africans). Yes I know, I know in America, people make fun of all different races. But you know it’s done on a lighter note, and most of the time it’s done by the comedians own race. And in America comedians and people in general steer clear of the “Black Face” jokes. 
    S.Korea why do you feel the need to only make fun of people of darker skin/complexion, I don’t  see them making fun of Caucasians, Hispanics/Latin, or even other Asians for that matter. But they feel the need to constantly put on “black face” routine. Why not just hired African Americans to play the part. That’s what the rest of the world does. 
    Look S.korea if you really wants to hit it mainstream, and be open to the rest of the world. You are going to have to right you wrongs or you will be getting a serious dose of the “ice water/cold shower” effect (That’s the effect were people think they are in with the crowd, but someone burst their bubble.). Don’t wait until it bit you in the a**, and things blow up in your face. Learn from you mistakes and never do it again. Simple as that.
     

    • Anonymous


      even other Asians for that matter.”

      no. they also like to make fun of SE Asia, calling us “third world countries”. heh. 

      • Capri08

        That’s true….Sorry about forgetting.

    • Guest

      nope, they make fun of everybody. they call out other asians, indians, caucasians, everybody. in korean street slang, a russian girl refers to a hooker. so they’re racially insensitive in general and until someone calls them out on it, they will keep doing it.

      • Capri08

        Really! Wow……True they tend to be racially insensitive, and i think it’s high time they stop using it as an excuse.
        As for making fun of other races I find that they do it when they are with each other, but you rarely find that they do it on television shows,…..or at least I have yet to see any.

  • Ga

    There seems to be a strong suggestion that Koreans don’t know any better. I don’t buy that. Honestly, I don’t know why some of these Korean producers keep targeting
    black people to the point that they would invest time into researching
    ways to act offensively? In this day and age (Dreamgirls skit aside) how
    many black people act the way they have been portrayed in Korean media?
    It’s as if they want to believe the worst in them in order to draw out
    some cheap, 50 years too late, laugh. It’s suspiciously specific and researched, and, truly bizarre.

    What I want to know is, how long do we placate people who willfully act
    in a certain way? Did they accidently stumble open those stereotypes?
    No. Did they purposefully research archaic tropes on blacks? Clearly. So, how long do
    we excuse that? Why would we excuse that? If they can take the time to research ways to be
    offensive, they can take the time to find out how their behaviour
    affects people.

    So let’s go with the contention that blackface is not a Korean cultural phenomenon. Then why do it? If it has nothing to do with their culture, how would they find it funny? How would they understand it’s nuances? It’s like me, an Irish girl living in London, with scant understanding of Japanese culture, going to watch a Noh theatre play and laughing along as if I even understood a word of it. What it boils down to, is that “they” enjoy laughing at exaggerated and offensive (there was nothing edifying about kikwang, Boom* or the Dreamgirls skit) stereotypes of black people.

    Is that any better? I don’t think so…

    I still say we ought to stand in solidarity with each other and not dictace when and how a person should feel offense. If my black/asian/middle eastern friends felt offended by something, I would absolutely sympathise. How can I tell them how to feel? Why would I get tired of defending them? They are my friends and human beings after all. I just don’t understand.

    *I don’t understand why he had to don dark make-up. Why not just sing the song? People would still know it’s Stevie Wonder.

    • Hahaha

      Because Boom can’t sing.

    • Guest

      you think they’re researching this? why would they research it. one writer watched dreamgirls. another writer thinks they can do a skit about it. so they think it up and think about how to film it. so, the actors paint their faces to mimic the cast, they add braids to further underline that the actors are meant to be black people and they go ahead with it. what research is involved in this?

      you don’t need to research archaic and racially offensive tropes to come up with this. these are images that are spread all over the world without context.

      nobody is saying this is not offensive or that it should not offend people.  

      • Ga

        Then it comes down to deliberate insensitivity. I’m sure they, and anybody else, would hate if somebody found the worst stereotypes about their ethnicity when they have a very easy option to just not do it.

        At the end of the day, even if they didn’t know that blackface was specifically racist, one nanosecond to say, “Hang on, if the tables were reversed, we wouldn’t like this. Perhaps we shouldn’t do it just incase in offends them.”

        It’s not that hard.

        Any way you look at it, it’s willful racial insensitivity; also known as racism.

        • Guest

          i think you’re expecting way too much from people. why would somebody in korea even think about what it’s like if someone else does it to them. in korea, there is no one else to do this to them. they’re catering to a korean audience. they don’t care about offending anyone else. they’re not thinking about hallyu and people watching it on youtube and seoulbeats writing about it. people keep saying how would koreans like it if someone did a slanted-eye skit or whatever. the fact of the matter is that no one in korea would do such a skit. if someone did it in the us, the chances of it making the news in korea are 50-50.

          people seem to be assuming that everyone in the world is on the same page as america in terms of laws, in terms of attitudes, in terms of political correctness. this is not true. the way racism is institutionalized in korea does not even make this kind of political correctiness possible. the way american popular culture is consumed without context in many parts of the world makes this kind of racism sadly prevalent.

          race and views on race are very different throughout the world. it is insensitivity, whether it is willfull or not, i don’t know. willfull would mean that they know what they are doing is wrong and still do it. the argument that people are making over and over again is that they don’t know it is wrong. that doesn’t make it less racist or less insensitive but it does explain why it happens over and over again.

          i don’t know why people are so stuck on the racism aspect of this as if someone is questioning it. there is no debate here. this is racist. it is offensive. it is insensitive. trying to explain the ignorance does change that in any way. why is it so difficult to accept that this kind of ignorance does exist and something needs to be done about it.

  • Guest

    Koreans making fun of black people while trying to swaggerjack them.

    Koreans making fun of how Ninomiya Kazunari of Arashi is short next to TVXQ’s Changmin.

    Koreans getting offended about Japanese protestors when their idols are working their asses off to make money because the economy in Japan is doing a fucking shitload better than their own.

    I love Korean idols and everything, but the attitude of some Koreans is really disgusting. Is there a race that they won’t talk shit about?

    • Anonymous

      I don’t think it’s a good idea to generalize like that. That’s the entire problem we are facing. You shouldn’t judge all Koreans by this incident, just like one shouldn’t judge blacks by what they see on tv.

      • someone can’t read

        “but the attitude of some Koreans is really disgusting. Is there a race that they won’t talk shit about?”

        • Anonymous

          Please read the rest of your post.

  • thunderandsmoke

    AGAIN?!?!! I am so tired of this nonsense and so tired of the fangirls/koreaboos who sit back and continue to play that “they don’t know any better” card. S.Korea is so wired/advanced its ridiculous and they are a developed country, so “non-exposure” explanations are plain bull. 

    the “imitation” of another race is never necessary or funny. Like another commentator said earlier: this is why no one will ever be able to take S. K. entertainment sector seriously. Jeez.

    • Manda

      I’m a koreaboo and sure they don’t know better, but they have enough influence from other cultures for them that they shouldn’t be doing things like this. I agree with you, its getting annoying on how they play the racists act to get laughs.

      • o__O

        Why are you bragging about being a Koreaboo, tho? Lol.

    • ggoma

      It’s not being a “Koreaboo” just because you realize that a couple of incidences doesn’t make a whole culture racist or racially insensitive. It’s called common sense.

  • G.

    It’s because Korean idols and Korean tv show producers don’t know how to use Google and look up what “blackface” is.

    Kinda funny how people think that everyone in Korea doesn’t know about the history of how African Americans were treated in the US, considering its extensive history. Even people in other countries know that black people were once slaves and there existed a group of people called the Ku Klux Klan who went around lynching black people just because they hated them. Yet Korea remains in the dark about this?

    Interesting…

    • G.

      I forgot to mention all the years of black and white segregation that happened. Don’t high schools around the world cover those highlights of American history in World History classes? Or is the US the only country in the world to include World History in their education curriculum?

      Odd how I know a lot about Asian history from my history class, but Korea knows nothing about American history because… they simply don’t teach it?

      Can someone from Korea support this belief and tell us that EVERY school in Korea (even international schools, like the one Tiffany, Jessica, and Krystal graduated from) does not teach world history?

      • GTOT

        Huh sorry America isn’t the center of the world. Of course a lot of countries cover American history but sorry to pop your bubble, not every country include World History in their education curriculum (and I was shocked to discover such country exists). I’m curious to know what you know about Asian history because I also learned about it but not as extensively as American history (and if you only know about the last 50 years of Asian history, you can’t say you “know a lot”).  During the 8 years I’ve had American history courses, blackface wasn’t included in my courses. That’s the harsh reality.

        • G.

          Wait, you had eight years of American history courses but know nothing about the way black people were treated in America? The hell were you learning all that time? O_o

          • GTOT

            I’ve never said I don’t know about how black people were treated. I know about the Mayflower, Protestants’ immigration, segregation, slavery, American president, the economic situation, US commitment in the WWII and all … but I didn’t know about blackface ! The main point was that some  things aren’t taught in courses.

        • Gohatto_taboo

          For America not to be the center of the world it sure seem like it if not stop blaming America for other country kids problem stop blaming all together and yes we had Asian culture in school. And in my American History there is a subject on blackface.

          • GTOT

            You definitely like to read only some parts of my comments. I said that “America isn’t the center of the world” because obviously a lot of American take it as granted that all the world know about the country history (and I said it as a response to the sentence ”
            Don’t high schools around the world cover those highlights of American history in World History classes “). I’m not blaming anyone, I haven’t said you haven’t learnt Asian culture. Heck! I haven’t even said that ALL American History courses don’t have a subject on blackface!!! You’re missing the whole point of my comment. You, learning Asian culture in school doesn’t mean you know everything (seriously, do you know about Laos history??) You, having a subject on blackface doesn’t mean every American History courses has one.

      • popcornpops

        No. Its World History not American History, of course not everyone will know about things you just said.

    • G.

      (Sorry for making my own little comment thread here…)

      I took the time to visit Naver.com and typed “blackface” into their search bar and came up with this…

      Google Chrome translated the page for me automatically, but anyway:

      http://i42.tinypic.com/95v52p.png

      So now there’s not really an excuse for them being ignorant. If racism against black people is relevant enough to be included in their country’s biggest search engine, I don’t understand why they keep doing what they do. :|

      • Guest

        Because they are “living white”.  lol  Not even….

  • Starvingxartists

    Considering this is a “comedy skit”, I hardly think Dreamgirls in itself (singing and dancing trio) is comedy gold. So think really hard, people who are defending this. Think really hard on what the punchline of this little video is in Korea.

    .

    • Gohatto_taboo

      What I hate the most it’s people justifying a group or person by say it’s not their fault.
      The manger had them do it, they can say no.

      • Boo

        Exactly. The people in SNL aren’t even idols so they aren’t tightly controlled. Kikwang, Teuk, and Boom are grown men with common sense (I hope) and empathy (I hope). 

    • ggoma

      Um, actually it’s about award shows, not making fun of black people. K. Thanks.

      • Guest

        In your own Kpop world of make believe it does….

        • ggoma

          Funny how knowing Korean and Korean culture kind of helps. I could careless about Kpop in comparison to that.

          • EKG

            So if it’s about Korean award shows and there are no black people who would be receiving awards, let alone performing on or attending the program, how is painting three actresses brown at all relevant to Korea or Korean culture?

            And if you’re so unconcerned about Kpop…why are you here?

  • guest

    I called Kikwang out for being racist and all the comments I got back were “Did you even watch the video?” and “He’s not racist.”  Mind you, these comments were from international fans. I don’t understand them and I’ve given up arguing with these people. I’m tired and frustrated on how ignorant people can be.

  • http://twitter.com/Cintaoftheworld Jacinta Scruggs

    I’ve had plenty of South Korean roommates who’ve stayed with me when they were studying abroad at my university in the US and I would say that it’s a very selective sensitivity regarding these things. FYI I’m an African American (black) female. All of them knew about slavery in the US and racism and all that stuff. I’ve never had a problem with racism between any of my roommates mind you, if anything they were always curious about my culture and I freely let them ask questions because many times people don’t really know whats offensive and what’s not offensive unless someone tells them. I tutor many ESL (english second language) students in english at my school and one of the Korean guys told me that he felt that because Korea isn’t as diverse as many other countries that many people easily get away with being ignorant or don’t really acknowledge it until the ignorance hits home. I remember when I was wrapping my hair up for bed once, one of my Korean roommates said that I looked really cool (lol). I was like “??? no way…” she said yeah it’s “hip hop style in Korea” which made me lol even harder. I told her that we (black people) don’t wear those satin scarfs on our heads as a fashion statement, we do it to preserve a style on our hair while we sleep; haha she said many people thought it really was a style. But yeah…I definitely think there’s a problem going on in Korea and it’s not funny and I am offended by it. I don’t give it a slap on the wrist anymore because like the writer said these people could easily look things up online if they were even a smigget concerned with how their skit would come off or if they even cared about being offensive. I haven’t been able to look at snsd the same way since that one chick (taeyeon ? i forget how her name is spelled) made that “she’s pretty for a black woman” comment. When artists do or say these kinds of things that offend me I tune them out and turn them off. period.

    • Dat1flygirl

      I completely agree with you! you post was very insightful! I am a black woman who is interested in all cultures, most recently Korean culture. I can understand that it started off as just being ignorant to black american culture and offensive stereotypes. That argument, however, no longer holds sway. There is too much information available to say you didn’t know it would be offensive. The people who are trying to justify this behavior are sad. Racism in any form against any ethnic group isn’t right PERIOD!  Accepting racism as the norm makes us no better than animals.

  • Anonymous

    Update on that.. The twitter account that you mentioned has said that they aren’t the official twitter for SNL Korea. But we can continue to tweet @chtvn

  • Ann

    K-pop fans are not famous for their wisdom. They will defend their oppa no matter what. Even though I like Beast, I can never like Kikwang because that blackface act. Yeah, Boom, and some guys from Suju included.

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think it’d be right to call this act racism, although it is racially insensitive. The SNL skit and other instances of blackface seem to occur out of ignorance.

    I’m from the US. I’ve taken AP US History and aced it. There might have been one section in the entire textbook that mentioned blackface. I’ll bet the majority of the US population doesn’t know what blackface is so should we expect South Korea to? Should we expect Koreans to know that it is wrong to charade as a different race for the sake of comedy? The difference is that America and other countries that have had a history with slavery and racial equality and a larger population of minority races have greater racial sensitivity to things like this. Korea has been mostly isolated in terms of racial diversity. I don’t imagine you would see many blacks, hispanics, or even whites in Korea. They don’t have a huge population that would stand up against racial insensitivity because the people they are offending are such a small portion of their population.

    I may sound like I’m defending their actions but I’m just trying to understand where it comes from and why they don’t see it as wrong. It is wrong! Americans make race jokes all the time but when they do it, the people who they are mocking are part of their audience (or the comedian belongs to the minority) and laugh along with it because often, it is true. When you make fun of a race that is not present in your country, it’s offensive, because it is misunderstood as a stereotype for people of that race.

    And although I don’t understand what they are saying, I don’t see anything that could be funny in the Dream Girls skit.

    • Anonymous

      Even if they didn’t know. Wouldn’t you think that Koreans would be offended if let’s say SNL from America did a skit about them and they taped their eyes?

      • Guest

        Or a skit showing their idols or celebs undergoing plastic surgery before and coming out after looking “TOTALLY” different.

      • Anonymous

        I didn’t say that it wasn’t offensive; it is. The sheer fact that all they did was lip-synch and people thought it was funny because of the way they looked was enough for me to question the SNL skit writer’s sense of humor.

        But in America they do have yellowface, where Caucasians play Asian characters in film. I didn’t hear about it until this year when I read about it in English class. Personally, I didn’t feel offended by the fact that they using make up techniques to make themselves appear more Asian, but more by the fact that they couldn’t hire an Asian actor to play these roles. (I’m Asian-American by the way.) This might be another point altogether but Asians are way underrepresented and wrongly represented in American media. That’s why I turn to Kpop.

    • Anonymous

      I have to echo some of the previous comments, which have asked the question, “How do these Korean entertainers know about all of these negative stereotypes (Kikwang and the watermelon, Bubble Sisters and the uncanny depiction of black mammy figures in the American South, Shindong and the offensive big red lips), but not know they are offensive?”

      It’s like they’re the ultimate pros when it comes to knowing all the back stereotypes, but don’t know how offensive they are. 

    • lalala

      racism is racism stop with the ignorance and excuse that they don’t know it offensive and racist.  

    • ggoma

      It’s funny because most Americans don’t even know American history yet there are all these experts on here about black face AND South Korean culture. -eyeroll-

      • Lill

        I pressed like accidentally when I was trying to reply. But I have to reply. Because…..of your eyeroll. I’ll inform you. I’m BOTH (apart of america and black culture).  I find your behavior rather offensive. Because its disrespectful to other people’s opinions and discrimination.

        First, I don’t find blackface funny because I believe, they really do understand why people would find it offensive. I think so because they find chink eyes offensive. If someone were to do chink eyes to represent or depict a Korean person I would find it offensive. Its unnecessary and it would really hurt a Korean person because its for derogatory purposes and we all know it. Thus its wrong. They should with all the common sense they possess realize other races and cultures have feelings too and thus should be treated with the same respect they think they deserve and demand. When Koreans go to other countries. They face the same racism at times, go home
        and tell about it (be realistic you know they do). I don’t get why they don’t understand that other
        races in their own countries would feel the same.

        Fact: I’ve met many Koreans and see in many Korean shows, lighter skin tones are praised and love. While darker is seen as unlovable, dirty or laughable. But before someone brings up America…..its called the civil rights movement…there are already many Americans fighting that war even now. But I don’t see any Koreans fighting the same war for other races. I just don’t. If anyone were to make chink eyes on national television in America we’d never hear the end of it. And I think that is a good thing, sensitivity to other people’s feelings isn’t a bad thing. Golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. I just think that’s common sense. Unless you’re a sociopath without feelings and have never felt discriminated against.

        Second, demanding someone prove their discrimination….. If someone feels discriminated against, just because you didn’t get any is ridiculous. I hate to compare them but its just for ridiculous value. If a rape victim was raped in my favorite bar I wouldn’t demand proof of the rape just because I was never raped there. Blaming the victims is really an asshole move, I agree.

        Third, as someone who has so much love and respect for koreans to see them not give the same. It is rather hurtful. I’d be up in arms if someone made some racist derogatory remark about a korean and I knew about it. It is hurtful! And if the race you are making fun of says its not funny its offensive that’s all the push you should need to cut it the f*%k out. That’s common decency. Because really I’d love to go to korea but I am afraid of the reception I’d get as a minority. I’d hate for my love to be ruined like that.

        Finally, if you want to spread your culture then you best be receptive to other cultures as well.

  • kc

    I think the reason we still are seeing blackface in Korean entertainment is because Korea doesn’t understand that it’s offensive… cause I mean really, how many Koreans in Korea are complaning? how often do we see Netizens’ throwing fits over blackface?
    A majority of the people who understand that blackface in racialy insensitive probably aren’t born and raised in Korea, they don’t know enough about the history of it to understand the significance of it.
    there isn’t much we can do but hope that some day someone “Korean” will bring it up, will tell people that it’s not something to joke about because of the terrible history behind it… but really, who knows when that’s gonna happen…

  • Seri-park

    The ignorance goes both ways… I think the majority of Caucasian Americans still insist that Micky Rooney’s yellow face in Breakfast at Tiffany’s is not offensive.  And then there is Long Duk Dong’s character is 16 Candles.  Horribly offensive, yet most Americans do not understand why.

    • Anonymous

      I know. But this is not the oppression olympics. Both are wrong and both should be explained to those who do not understand.

      • Seri-park

        I’m simply saying that everyone has A LOT to learn, not just the Koreans.  A lot of Americans in the midwest and less urban regions are still horrifically ignorant.

    • Anonymous

      I think a lot of Americans do understand why. I saw Micky Rooney’s character in Breakfast at Tiffany’s just recently and I was absolutely shocked! I turned to one of my friends and asked him, “Is this real?” 

      Hollywood itself is an interesting thing because their portrayal of blacks and asians leaves much to be desired. Gangsters or Martial artists smh.

  • Yuchen1290

    When i see things like this coming from ANYONE it really leaves me kind of speechless. First of all in this particular case they werent really doing anything funny other than lip synching the song. Yet still there was laughter, though not nearly as much as i was expecting which may speak volumes for koreans. There was only one instance for a split second that one of the girls was acting sort of foolish. Maybe the fact that they werent really acting stupid or foolish sends the message to koreans that simply being black is something funny and should be mocked. I dont know. Was it insensitive yes but it wasnt the worst ive seen by far. I think the most alarming thing about this issue is the reaction or lack there of from international fans. Inevitably people start saying that america is racist too and start bring up the plethora of examples from american media. I shouldnt really have to explain why that argument is ridiculous so im not going to. I’m not going to argue that america isnt racist because it undeniably is. It is part of our history. I feel that the difference is that americans are aware of it. It is because we know it that so many of us are not content to just let racism slide. People constantly confront racism in this country whether your black, white, asian, hispanic or whatever else there is. Just about everyone is aware of it and people constantly fight against it. People constantly point out when a racist situation pops up in politics or entertainment or in any other sphere of american life. About 50 years ago people of “color” didnt even have the same rights as the white majority. The minorities put there foot down and demanded equal rights. The freedom to work and live without institutionalized discrimination. That isnt a long time ago at all. My father wasnt  born with the same rights i was born with. Overall, america has transitioned to a much more open society where most everyone is welcome. That doesnt mean there isnt a long way to go. There is but when i think of how quickly this country changed it’s really quite amazing. Korea im sure has changed a lot too. I guess what im trying to say is just because someone else may be racist and not understand the racial conotations of their actions doesnt mean that it’s okay to just accept that and turn a blind eye to it. Making fun of someone based on something as innate as skin color is never okay. There is no excuse for them at this point in the Hallyu Wave, which the korean media seems to covet so dearly, for things like this to happen. They know they have a large international fan base. The marketing is increasingly targeting this same fan base. It is up to the fanbase to educate them (if they truly cant see that it’s offensive) about the historically racist context of blackface. I didnt understand why the koreans and japanese were so hostile towards eachother but i eventually figured it out through kpop and the hallyu wave making me interested in korean history and culture. People try so hard to make the hallyu wave a one way street but it is impossible that the hallyu wave wont bring some foreign culture into korea. It’s called cultural diffusion. Cultures have been intertwining forever. America may be just as ignorant and racist as korea but people have no problem calling americans out on it. It is time people do the same for korea.

  • mei

    When I learned world history in school, we did have a few chapters on American history, however in none of those chapters did the issue of blackface come up. Honestly the very first time I read about it was on omona and after googling it I understood how big and sensitive the issue is. But before this, since my own history didn’t have a precedent like this (although it does have enough racism of it’s own kind), I was completely ignorant about it.

    I think a proper response doesn’t amount to pointing the finger and calling someone a racist – it’s in the end educating that person on why this is racist. Maybe not all the people are willing to look things up or are generally interested in history, yet we should explain to them and how harmful or damaging these skits can be.

    Also, Yoon Mi Rae tweeted abut the SNL skit. I’m pretty sure about it.

    • Anonymous

      what tweet? i see nothing wrong with her tweets these days.

  • Xenia

    What, again?
    Okay, blackface is highly offensive for everyone who knows about what it is. No, in Russian schools/universities they never, not once mention EXACTLY blackface as some simbol of racism. They teach about slavery, etc.,etc., but do not mention blackface per se. First time I saw blackface was when I was about ten and in opera. And it repeated every other year. Sorry, but there are zero black singers that can perform Othello’s role in Russia. And, you know, it would be stupid if Othello was white on stage, so blackface is kind of necessary, imo. 

    There are very little black people in Russia, and probably that’s why we don’t learn all the details about racism directed against black people. What I want to say is that while for Americans it may look like ignorance, the problem of racism against black people was never a problem on the land of Russia. We had more problems with nationalism directed against other white nations or hate based on religion (with Islamic, Jewish, Catolic population). So, naturally, there’s more time spend in our lives on learning about these problems than on dangers of racism against black people.

    I’m sure there are not many black people in SK too. So I actually can easily believe that for them it was just a way to imitate physical appearance. If a performance by itself is offensive (like, if the behavior of those actors demonstrates some not-to-be-mentioned stereotypes), it’s completely different thing. But just dark paint on a face of some girl who never knew about blackface and hadn’t try to offend anyone – just tryed to imitate black actress from a film/musical… poorly, I have to add… It doesn’t look like a problem to me, and I’m not sorry about that.

    • Rose

      Lack of knowledge about a certain topic can only be used in an argument like this for long and the fact that you and many others like you are not sorry about your ignorance is the main reason offensive things like this keep happening. Just because only a small population of a particular ethnic group resides in a country whether it be Russia or Korea does not negate the fact that cultural sensitivity and tact need to be used when paying “homage” or whatever other thing you want to call it. There are plenty of ways to mimic people without resorting to blackface and if a group of people is continuously telling you that the way you choose to “honor” them is offensive as hell then just change. It’s really not that difficult and I cannot understand the desire to hold on to the offensive tradition in the face of all the backlash. 

      • Xenia

        There was no “blackface” in Russia. No black population – no reason to make fun of them. So we don’t know about it. This simbol is unknown to us. I belive it can be unknown to Koreans too.

        I bet you don’t know that western Ukrainians are often known as “white pants” and laughed at because of that by some eastern Ukrainians. And if you see some guy humourosly dancing in wide white pants you will not know that it’s an offensive act for some people. Shame on you. If you were not ignorant like that you would learn any possible way to offend any ethnic, religious or social group on this planet. You should be sorry for your lack of knowledge and interest for dramatic history of Ukraine (it is dramatic, no joke here).

        I’m not sorry because I firmly believe that it’s impossible to know all details about everything. And while I think negatively of people in general, I still know that most of them don’t intend on hurting other people. And, sorry, what group of people was continuosly telling about offence to whom? Black population wrote an open letter to SNL Korea or what? Or do you mean this conversations on some random blog? Sure, everybody at Korean TV stations know about it. Ahha. Did you inform them? I hope you did, because I forgot.

        • Anonymous

          You talked about the white pants thing in Ukraine. I’ve never heard of that. And because I’m ignorant of that, you’d never see me dancing in the streets with white pants on because it’s something I’ve never been exposed to.

          But if I did do that, it’s because I know specifically how hurtful it is to western Ukrainians. If I did that, it’s because I saw it somewhere on television before and knew that it was derogatory.

          My point is, the Korean entertainment shows that include blackface in their skits do it because they’ve seen it somewhere before and know that it is potentially hurtful.

          Does that make any sense?

          • Xenia

            Not really. Does a white singer that plays Othello in dark makeup disturb you? It’s a tragic role of a very noble man. I can’t see how it can be offensive. I don’t think every actor in black paint should be considered a racist just because of this.

          • Anonymous

            I didn’t say it was racist. I said it was ignorant. There’s no reasoning with you Xenia.

          • Rini

            As an African American, I don’t find that particular thing to be offensive. For the role of Othello, him being a Moor is central to the plot. And in Russia, how are the directors going to find a black person who speaks perfect Russian and is a good enough actor to fill the role. I think if they had someone like that then they would just cast that person. I have seen videos of American high school productions of Aida on YouTube where they put dark make up on the girl playing Aida, and if the girl does the role properly then there is nothing wrong with that (If it were a Hollywood film, however, then that would be a whole different story because it’s not like there aren’t professional American actresses who could play that role) I also saw a woman in dark make up do the same thing in the professional Korean production of Aida. This woman had an amazing voice and as far as I could tell, portrayed the character very well. So no, the thought of a white person in dark make up portraying the titular character in the Russian production of Othello does not offend me at all whatsoever.

        • Anonymous

          You can’t use that small example to compare it to the continuous and painful degradation of a whole race of people. It’s more widespread than that and also more historically documented than something as benign as white pants.

          It has to stop somehow, if you continue to make excuses then it will continue happening.

          • Xenia

            Maybe it’s widespread – in US – but as far as I can see in comments many of people here learned about blackface from this blog. Now, I suppose it’s a good thing that this information is passed around. But you can’t expect from foregners to know beforehand about all the details of US history and about all forms of discrimination that were used against black population.  Other nations have their own problems that they have to think about, things that are more important in their real lifes. The world doesn’t rotate around one group of people and it’s quite insolent of you to think that every person in this world should dig deeper than basic knowledge of slavery and following discrimination and why exactly it’s bad.
            I can offer black person only as much politeness and simpathy as I offer to a white, asian or any other person, I don’t feel obliged to walk on my tiptoes because of the skin colour of the one I’m talking to.

    • Anonymous

      Yours is a straw man’s argument that is no longer valid in the 21st century. So what if you didn’t grow up in America and racism and symbols/examples of racism wasn’t spoon-fed in World History class? Today, the only excuse of ignorance is that of apathy because the most oppressed group is usually the smallest and therefore, the most ignored until they yell loud enough for you to take the cotton out of your ears and wool out of your eyes. Not living in a multicultural environment is not an excuse to behave in a racially insensitive way. Countries all over the world now have access to television, internet, and books are being translated on a regular basis. It’s your prerogative now to decide whether you remain ignorant when you have too many opportunities to learn. You can choose the easy way and learn about racism, sexism, and discrimination through college courses (America has many colleges and a lot are going online) and simply seeking the information on your own, or you can take the hard way like America did and Korea/Asia in general is still doing by shoving the issue under the rug until enough people raise a stink and make it an issue that gets heard all around the world.

      • Xenia

        I know following facts:
        – slavery existed in America, and that was a horrid act against black people (and other races, including some white nations too, if what I’ve read about Irish slaves is true). Slavery existed in many other countires, including Russia (our very own, domestic Russian slaves – up to 1861; and yes, I know and care about them much more than about any other slaves). And, unfortunately, even after this practice vanished the discrimination continued and still takes place often now. Oh, and by the way, if you want to read anything that points with most passion on the crime that is slavery and racial discrimination, just read old Soviet history textbook. Believe me, every white American in this book looks like blood-sucking monster, including newborn babies.
        – one should never judge a person on their abilities and human qualities basing on their race. All people are (or should be) equal in the terms of their rights. I don’t know what to add, it’s kind of obvious.

        It’s perfectly enough for me. Why do you think that I have to have a desire to know more on the matter is beyond me. And why do you think I should prefer black people to be an object of my research (and not Indian, Irish or Cuban) is also beyond me. I know everything I want and don’t mind occasional receiving of additional information, but I’m not going to go and buy a textbook or google it. Really, all that talking about how no other race suffered as much – okay, fine,and what now? Does it make black people and their history more important for learning than tragedies and unjustice in existence and history of Jewish, Armenian, Nepal or any other people? Why do some people think that it’s a question of most importance compared to all others?

        I firmly believe that every nation has some dark history behind and it can’t be helped. Also every nation has their week points now in the present time and it can’t be helped. Also, I have no bad habit of awaiting all the worst from people around me and I’m not waiting with some unhealthy greed for ill intentions from all possible sources. Maybe I don’t have enough self-doubt but I usually laugh at pathetic attempts to say anything bad about my country or my people. I mean, I’m RUSSIAN. In my books, it’s something to be proud of up to my last breath. What other people think means less than last year’s snow. I will probably not react even to direct offence, because it’s below me to answer to silly jokes or rude words.

        Anyway, for me it’s an interesting discussion and I’m thankful for all the people that took time to comment on my posts. This discussion is much more lively than those on “official” sites and it feeds my curiosity towards the matter in hands)))

    • becky

      Your ignorance is gobsmacking and the fact that you got five likes is even worse, I’m not suprised you come from a  country like Russia, What you guys have no problems with racism?. The fact that African migrants experience racism in Russia on a higher scale than any other European country is a fact. The only example you could come up with is Othello, well no one is particularly suprised, given Russia is slowly turning into a Hermit Kingdom in itself. Black American culture is one Americas biggest exports, when you respect or admire a culture you don’t plead ignorance after insulting it, when all it would take to avoid the trouble is google. 

      • Xenia

        Oh, as I’ve told racism isn’t big in Russia. Nationalism is much bigger, as people who suffer of discrimination here are mostly of caucasian race. I repeat, there are close to no black people in Russia, so nobody cares about them. Also, if you say “black” about a person in Russian you will not even mean a one of negroid race (sorry, I don’t know how to say it without using “negroid”). “Black” in Russian is humiliating nickname for people from Middle East, Northern Caucases, Middle Asia – those who have black hair, not skin. And discrimination against them is severe, it’s a huge problem, especially fueled by illegal migrants (nobody likes them, you see).

        What African migrants are you talking about, are you sane, there are like 100 of them in a whole Russia! There are so little Russian-born black people that they show them on TV, and some random foreign students from Peoples’ Friendship University named after Patrice Lumumba that almost never stay in Russia after they get their diplomas. Do you really think that many black people migrate to Russia of all places? Sure, sometimes they are the victims of racial hate, but it’s a drop in sea compared to people from Caucases or Middle Asia.

        And what other examples exept for Othello can I give to you? There was, like, ONE black person that meant anything in history of Russia – one of Peter the Great’s generals, Abram Petrovich Gannibal (Petrovich – because Peter I was his godfather). Yes, actor in the movie that was describing Gannibal’s love to a lady from the very old Russian aristocratic family (whom he, by the way, married) was Russian sporting blackface. Nobody at this blog probably saw that movie, so why mention, right? It was a very positive role, not a parody by any means. Oh, and Gannibal’s great grandson – Aleksandr Pushkin – is the greatest Russian author ever born. The words “Pushkin is our everything” are written above the entrance to, like, half of Russian schools. Pushkin was quite fond of his exotic heritage and was very proud of himself and his grandfather. That’s all. No other black people in history of Russia. That leaves us with Othello and 1 and 1/4 real life black people who can be somewhat of interest in Russia so I could use them as example.
        I’m talking only about what I know from personal experience, the one that I was able to get where I live. YOU can give all other examples you want, I’m sure you can find more of them somewhere on the west. And I can tell you only about what I see in Russia (close to nothing black-related exept for music videos on MTV and ocasionally Obama in news). One opera and one movie – duh, way to become a specialist in blackface.

        Russia is the Hermit Kingdom, huh. It’s almost a kingdom already, alright, what with MedvePut OTP XDDD Not hermit yet, though. Who knows. But I wouldn’t wait from the foreigners to know anything about Russia beyond Putin, Stalin, vodka and bears, so I hope you don’t mind if I quote your words to my friends for laughs))))

  • http://twitter.com/NotMyBirthday21 Lakeisha

    I’m not surprised by this anymore. Korea is not a multiculture country. There are maybe like 50 black people living in Korea. Korea can continue to be insensitive. I will never ever travel to Korea. No matter how much i like kpop.

  • Anonymous

    This is the first time I’ve heard of blackface. In all of my history classes the main subjects we learned about, when we got to American history, were just about slavery and the civil war.
    I’ve seen a couple of Korean varieties that joked about African Americans, but the biggest one that stuck with me was on Oh My School! when this guy made fun of how African American’s in America act. At first I thought it was funny, but then I realized how unfunny it really was because it basically was about Americans in general but mainly on African Americans.
    Stuff like this doesn’t really bother me, it just depends on the joke, but actually painting your skin black just goes too far. After awhile people get fed up with jokes based on a certain race especially if it’s the same jokes being made all the time.

  • guest

    What next the N word on snl korea,this is why kpop will stay in korea

  • Guest

    i wanted to comment on the article but after i read the comments, i had to write something about that. the comments in this post are just…i can’t even find the words.
     
    people need to realise the reality of race outside of the us. by saying things like it should be common sense or that ignorance is being used as an excuse or a defence of blackface is belittling the way non-koreans are treated in korea. as if all the racist attacks they face on a regular basis would be dealt with with a little common sense. or the idea that if only the koreans would use the internet to figure this shit out. it’s also sad to see people continually saying that korea is targetting black people. korea targets minorities, period. black, brown, blue, it doesn’t matter.
     
    people who’re talking about white privilege completely ignore the way white females are often treated in korea as prostitutes who would be willing to jump into bed at the drop of a hat. privilege comes from being part of the majority. no one in korea other than koreans have any kind of privilege. some have it much worse than others, no doubt, but every non-korean can and does face racism in some form or the other.
     
    i think you guys need to watch this video – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AgTwlB3J81U. this is an indian professor took his racist attacker to court and was the first to do so. this was in 2009. that’s right, 2009. korea had never had a criminal complaint lodged about racism till 2009 and even then, to get the police to actually take him seriously was difficult. the anti-racism bill in korea became law after this. AFTER 2009. 
     
    korea has a very complicated relationship with race and it’s a relationship that is defined by the country’s history, homogeniety, isolation, economic development, socio-cultural make-up etc etc. it’s very complex and it’s amazing to me that people simply cannot see the bigger picture or see how this snl skit is symptomatic of a much larger problem. and rather than sitting and sniping at each other and accusing each other or making blanket statements about korea, we need to focus on the larger issue and how to let korea know that this is not right, period. and that it’s not right to do to any minority group. it really is not as simple as you guys think and the continued ethnocentrism in this post is adding to the problem not resolving it. 
     
     

    • ggoma

      Funny because I never saw any racism while I was there. And no, people didn’t think I was a slut because I’m an American woman. There are certainly Korean men who see a white woman and assume she’s easier, but they are obviously douche bags so what’s the point of even caring? Most Korean men aren’t like that. It’s one story to watch things on youtube and to hear about things that have happened sporadically and then say that it’s constantly happening all over the country and that all 

      Honestly, most foreigners come to Korea and view it as their playground. You want to know why Korea is wary of (mostly male) foreigners? Because if you’ve lived there for any amount of time, you can see tons of them acting like idiots on the subways or clubs or trying to sleep with any Korea woman who will walk by them, let alone talk to them. They don’t bother to try and fit it AT ALL. That’s what pisses the Korean people off. (and the incidences of rapes against Korean women by gangs). There is a significantly less bias against foreign females because usually we don’t do this crap. 

      I had African American friends from church who lived there. I had friends of many colors. They never felt discriminated against and never had any problems. Why? Because they were respectful. 

      Yes, of course, there are racists in Korea. But they are not out “everyday” bashing on the foreigners. I can understand Korean, when a foreigner walks by, people might look because they aren’t as common but they don’t talk crap about them behind their backs or something. 

      I think that a lot of this gets hyped up here because people want to look at controversy and don’t check the sources. These are mostly radicals, with a few true stories of racism in there. But most expats who talk about this stuff are looking for an excuse to hate their surroundings. I’ve seen it happen so many times. There are indeed some cases, I’m not denying that, but if you look at the cases of racial violence or racial comments, America is much higher than Korea. 

      • Guest

        I’m glad you or your friends never faced any discrimination but I have and other people have. And it wasn’t because we were disrespectful. And yes it can happen everyday because there are thousands of foreigners of different races who interact with Koreans on a daily basis.

        No one is saying that all Koreans are racist or that they’re the only racist country in the world. The point of this post was not to claim those things. The point of this post was to address the comments like this is just common sense. It’s not in Korea because they have a different history and it’s up to foreigners who live there to point out why things that Koreans may not think are offensive can be seen as offensive or insensitive or racist.

        And that one story on YouTube that you dismiss caused headlines nationally and has become part of the discourse on race in Korea rn because Koreans themselves are dealing with a society that is changing because of mail-order brides. Believe it or not but there are people who’re not English teachers in Korea, who work blue-collar jobs, who’re not out behaving like idiots on subways because they don’t have the time to.

        You’re experience may have been great but not everybody’s is and by insinuating that yours is the only valid opinion you’re doing exactly what the commenters who’re accusing people of defending blackface are doing.

        ps why are we comparing Korea and America again?

        • ggoma

          One, I didn’t reference one specific youtube example did I?
          Two,  I didn’t merely point out my own experience, but of many others as well. 
          Three, I said in MOST cases it was because of disrespectful behavior (which reflects on others as well). 
          Four, please provide examples of this so-called “discrimination” on a personal level? 

          • Guest

            1. since i referenced a yt vid, it’s only natural to assume that you were talking about that.

            2. i did refer to your friends experiences as well.

            3. and i said that there are cases where it’s not disrespectful behaviour.

            4. do you want pictures, articles or yt vids? why on earth should anyone have to provide proof to you of all people? are you the ultimate judge of whether or not someone was discriminated against? you weren’t. good for you. other people are. korea is not perfect to everybody just because it was perfect for you. and it’s not always someone else’s fault. if you concede that racism does occur in korea, then why do you need proof of my personal discrimination? sorry to break it to you, but i don’t need to provide proof to you to prove that i was discriminated against. and a word of advice, victim blaming is an asshole move. 

          • ggoma

            You call yourself a victim, why don’t you back it up? Do you not actually have anything to say? Are you just trying to look like a victim? Who knows. Anyone can say anything on the internet.

          • ggoma

            You call yourself a victim, why don’t you back it up? Do you not actually have anything to say? Are you just trying to look like a victim? Who knows. Anyone can say anything on the internet.

      • Guest

        I’m glad you or your friends never faced any discrimination but I have and other people have. And it wasn’t because we were disrespectful. And yes it can happen everyday because there are thousands of foreigners of different races who interact with Koreans on a daily basis.

        No one is saying that all Koreans are racist or that they’re the only racist country in the world. The point of this post was not to claim those things. The point of this post was to address the comments like this is just common sense. It’s not in Korea because they have a different history and it’s up to foreigners who live there to point out why things that Koreans may not think are offensive can be seen as offensive or insensitive or racist.

        And that one story on YouTube that you dismiss caused headlines nationally and has become part of the discourse on race in Korea rn because Koreans themselves are dealing with a society that is changing because of mail-order brides. Believe it or not but there are people who’re not English teachers in Korea, who work blue-collar jobs, who’re not out behaving like idiots on subways because they don’t have the time to.

        You’re experience may have been great but not everybody’s is and by insinuating that yours is the only valid opinion you’re doing exactly what the commenters who’re accusing people of defending blackface are doing.

        ps why are we comparing Korea and America again?

  • Anonymous

    I think the worst thing I’ve seen is people trying to brush this off with comments like “American’s make fun of [ethnicity here] all the time” and etc. No no no no no. Guys, that is not an excuse. In fact, that’s just as wrong and even more upsetting! It’s because people keep brushing it off or laughing it off that it gets slapped into the media and people think it’s cool. It’s not. No matter what ethnicity is, no matter if they weren’t going for racism, another person’s ethnicity is never a joke and should never be seen as one. You should speak on it whenever it arises even if it’s something like “Well, I don’t think you were trying to offensive…but you are”. If someone doesn’t know, tell them. Why keep someone in the dark if you have a flashlight on you?

    • Guest

      I do understand, but tbh do you REALLY think that americans can overcome racism?????? Sorry but I don’t think so. I would like it, but I highly doubt it. And personally, now I’m really numb to it. When I was little I was really hurt, I really don’t give a fuck. But I like ur. Optimism :)

      • Anonymous

        It’s more than just Americans who should be trying to overcome it. Of course, there may be way to overcome racism but should people just sit around and let it happen? Why? You being numb to it only proves my point further that it’s something people should be speaking out on. Why did you have to become numb to something like that? If I can shed light to at least one person on how something like this effects others, then what’s the harm? If you don’t take any offense & don’t give a fuck, well that’s you, but I do and I will say it.

  • Guest

    to everyone who thinks that blackface has magically disappeared from american tv and people have to go back years to see blackface on tv are clearly not watching much tv. on snl, there’s been fred armisen’s obama impersonation (that snl calls honeyface), darrell hammond’s rev. jesse jackson impersonation, billy crystal’s sammy davis jr. sketch, jimmy fallon’s chris rock impersonation and more. there’s rob mcelhenney on it’s always sunny in philadelphia and jane krakowski on 30 rock. oh and roger sterling on mad men. i don’t know what to call ken jeong’s blackface elf on community. in films, there’s robert downey jr. in tropic thunder.

    and this is just off the top of my head. i’m sure if i googled it, i’d find more. in some cases, like it’s always sunny…, the episode talked about blackface and whether it is appropriate and ken jeong was portraying a drow from dungeons and dragons. but that context does not always come across when these episodes are watched outside of america.

    the point here is not that america’s blackface record is worse or that korea’s blackface record is better but that this is still happening in american pop-culture and that pop culture is being exported and while the images get exported easily enough, the context (if there is any), the debate (if there is any), the public backlash (if there is any) is not.

    and blackface happens on tv in other countries as well. the one where whoopi defended it was from australian tv. again, this is not to say that it’s okay because it happens everywhere. it’s to say that it does happen on tv still and with some regularity. so korean tv producers don’t really have to go dig (if they dig at all) for the stereotypes they’re portraying.

  • guest

    Snl korea should take its cue from this restaurant owners experience and apologize to its black fans 
    http://edition.cnn.com/2012/01/08/us/new-york-papa-johns-receipt/index.html
    an asian lady got apology from a restaurant over racism on a receipt. those of you saying blackface exists in America its no excuse though.  Kpop is fuccked up

    • Guest

      An apology was the least they could do. If you read the comments people wrote, 99% of the people were saying that asians couldn’t take a joke, if she has chinky eyes why can’t she be called that, that’s not something to be fired for, etc etc. Therefore, I think that America as a majority, didn’t believe an apology was necessary, therefore, why the fuck should we apologize for something that wasn’t degrading in the first place?

      • guest

        at the end of the day the restaurant apologized, PERIOD. I’ve had enough of this arguement, At least now I know were I stand with you lot. 

      • guest

        racism is racism. painting your face black could be hurtful to some and not others. pulling your eyes back could be racists to some and not others. either way if you know that you are degrading a culture/race then let me tell you. its racists. no matter is you felt there was no bad intention. it hurt someone somewhere. 

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know whether to laugh or to be appalled at the amount of people actually defending the skit in these comments. Most, if not all, of the arguments don’t even make sense, especially whenever America & its racist track record is brought up. Somehow it’s supposed to be okay for Korea, Russia, or whatever country to continue doing offensive things.. because America does it too!. Give me a break.

    Until people stop deferring responsibility and pleading ignorance, things like this will continue to happen. Maybe someday a native-born Korean person in a media position can actually bring light to it because so far nobody there really cares.

  • HaHa

    Personally I’m not offended by this, although I was hurt by the bubble sisters (I was a fan). I do believe the intent might be benign but it’s not benevolent! They might not mean to hurt someone, but I don’t think they care if they do. As long as it doesn’t come back on them, hey it’s all good.This is the way most people think these days. Totally child-like in all the wrong ways.

    What I want to know from people like ‘ggoma’ and the like is: What is so bad about people being offended by others laughing at someone trying “to be like them” with the intention of comedy? Ask yourself what would be lost in Korean entertainment without such displays, and then ask what would be gain? Obviously NOTHING would be lost, so I cannot see any reason for some to defend this, no matter the intentions. What would be gained is, at the very least, the outward appearance of culture and ethnic sensitivity. So there is nothing to protect, nothing worht keeping to lose.

    For someone to actually seem outraged that people get hurt by this, is to admit unknowningly for all to see, they have no empathy for superficially specific plights and injustices; and to show they have some EXTRA rose colored glasses for the offenders[I’d hate to see how they own up to their own offenses].  If you got hit in the face by a Korean on accident, would it hurt less? What if you got punched for laughs, wouldn’t it feel the same? Now imagine getting punch for laughs by someone you were trying to be sensitive to and mindful of, even though you have no obligation (you admire them). That is the feeling of a lot of people, if they get offended it’s there right. If you are not black nor Korean, you have place in the matter, because it has nothing to do with you historically, culturally or emotionally. Either way, the intent doesn’t justify the bad end result and a mature intelligent person would self-correct. An immature person will avoid responsibility and go on to make the same bad decisions and hurting more people, including themself.

    Shame for someone to think so little and talk so much.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1356901062 Pantiwah OneZeroo

     “If internationals fans can learn to respect and be sensitive towards Korean culture while consuming it, why can’t K-broadcasting stations and Korean culture in general be the same way?”PREACH!!!!!!!!!!!

    • Guest

      Explain to me how Asians trying to portray dream girls by coloring their skin is insensitive? Did they ANYTHING to degrade blacks? Did they pat their head, act ghetto, say any racist jokes? Hmmmmm??????? no. As an Asian trying to imitate dream girls, what else could they do? When non Asians are asked to portray asians the first thing they do is, do the chinky eye thing? But do you see us bitching and complaining??? Nooooo

      • NoirNoir

        They really could have just dressed up as the Dream Girls w/o the brown skin. They aren’t imitating “Black girls.” They’re imitating “Dream Girls,” who are Black American, but, seeing as it’s South Korea, it’s totally understandable that they would be Korean-looking in a production put on by a Korean company. If I was imitating someone who was South Korean (as in raised in South Korea), I would imitate their individual mannerisms and signature style, not pull my eyes and speak indiscriminate Engrish (that probably doesn’t even sound like them).

        And just because you’re a punk about racism/insensitivity directed towards your people doesn’t mean everyone else has to.

        • Nailahp

          EXACTLY! 

      • todsam

        How many americans as of late have been portraying asian as yourself that. Why can’t swhite people for once, it would be just as funny, but it seems like they just cannot resist pointing at black people for comedy its kind of sad.

  • Anonymous

    I am black and to me this is not black face. Black face is when you are mocking black people by painting yourself brown to 
    create a stereotyped caricature of a black person. This seems to me they are just trying to portray black people. 

    • mlb

      Well said!  I’m mixed and I didn’t find this offensive either because I didn’t see them acting in a way that was cruel towards black people.

    • a n

      No, you are being indifferent about it because they are not White. Had they been White all hell would have broken lose! Hard as nails on Whites, but as soft as a feather on Asians! It’s as simple as that!

  • Guest

    Wowww it’s amazing to see how many guys are acting like you’ve never seen racism? Has anyone heard bout the lady chinky eyes at papa johns? An Asian women ordered something at papa johns and the cashier took her order as ‘lady chinky eyes’ If you read the comments most of them are like ‘ if she has chinky eyes, why can’t she be called that’ And then you guys are saying koreans are ignorant and don’t have a good education? Woooooowwwwwwww hypocritical at it’s best. If this article were to be posted on ny times or an American newspaper company, NAACP, african American activists and etc etc would have gone MADDDD and they would have killed those 3 comedians in the video. But lady chinky eyes is okay? BULLSHIT. Is racism wrong? Of course? But if you are going to use it to degrade someone, don’t flip out when someone uses it to degrade you. Personally, as an asian I’m used to chinky eyes, Ching Chang Chong, but don’t you dare complain if I do blackface. Cuz then, we are going to have a problem

    • http://twitter.com/Saara2011 Saara

      I’m sure that the majority of people have experienced or seen racism. The point being made is that it is not discussed in the context of S.Korea. As you said, racism is wrong, no one has said that ‘lady chinky eyes’ is ok- it shouldn’t be accepted from any side or in any context, but it is completely wrong in my opinion to fight like with like in this situation. Using ‘blackface’ does not make you any better than those calling you ‘Ching Chang Chong’. If I had seen you in the street with ‘blackface’  I would definitely complain because even if someone has been racist to you, you should not become a racist yourself- you are then being racist to a whole community/ nation of people, none of whom you know and many of whom will probably never be racist to you. It should be beneath you.

    • guest

      Saying “ny times or an American newspaper company, NAACP, african American activists and etc etc would have gone MADDDD and they would have killed those 3 comedians in the video” is totally taking it too far that’s just craziness. I’m African American and I found the video to be hurtful but when your race is being picked on who wouldn’t be hurt.

      • seeee

        We both know that they wouldn’t have been quiet about this. The NAACP are the ones who said the “you mad bro” is racial intimidation. I’m not saying its Naacp’s fault. Of course, racism is wrong. But I think that certain races get more protection in this country which is the unfair part. What frustrates me is as an asian, we are more than often made fun of about our race and we get told “if you have chinky eyes, why cant you be called chinky eyes” “ching chang chong” etc etc however if anyone else making degrading comments/actions towards a black person, such as the n word, they get like sued, arrested, etc etc and its all over the news. I just dont get it 

        • Frostinggurl

          but bear in mind that blacks in America were the ones who took the initiative to defend themselves, many of these civil rights organizations  came about because African americans were tired of taking racial abuse and realized that no one else was going to stand up for them but they themselves.So its not a case of them just “getting more protection” as u stated, for no reason but because ppl like martin luther king jr and Malcolm x etc etc have been demanding respect for decades.So if u feel like as Asians racial abuse directed at u guys goes unnoticed and unpunished then maybe u guys need to establish some organizations to deal with that instead of complaining that African Americans get more protection.They get more protection cuz they put in the work.

  • http://twitter.com/phannan Ana Hannah

    “With a country so intent on pushing its culture out to the masses you would think instances like this would be a thing of the past.”
    So true. Blackface has a hurtful history and because of the way it was used in the past, I don’t think their intentions were benign.Star King also mocked Muslims and hurt a lot of Malaysian/Indonesian fans. They dressed up a Korean girl in a Saudi Arabian dress and headscarf (that outfit isn’t even necessary in Muslim; modest dress is all that’s required) and had her belly dance, which is Polynesian, to Hindi music -.-

  • whatthefrell

    This topic rears it’s ugly head every now and again.
    I have commented before at great length;
    but to be honest with you, it leaves me with a heavy heart.
    It is my one disappointment with the Korean culture.

    I suppose I could excuse them,
    as despite it’s increasing openness,
    Korea, for the most part still remains a homogenous society.
    Perhaps if there were more people of colour,
    maybe then actual people of colour could portray people of colour.

    However, for a culture that embraces, entertainment wise anyway,
    another culture and then mocks it so carelessly, it boggles the mind.
    And no, saying everybody else does it too is not good enough.
    After each incident that I have been made aware of, there is a backlash.
    And one would think someone would be paying attention,
    most especially when so many K-pop artists are wanting exposure in the States.

    For the record, I am a black female,
    and to me, this use of Blackface is kind of like the “N” word.
    I do not like it, I do not appreciate it, I don’t use it,
    and I don’t like when anyone else uses it,
    I don’t care what color or race you are.
    Somethings you just don’t do — period.

    I know there are Korean entertainers out there who get this,
    and I am so thankful for them, and would ask of them to
    educate their brothers and sisters on this matter.
    For, as I stated in a previous post,
    if for example, Rain, or any member of my fave MBLAQ
    were to participate in such a thing,
    it would absolutely break my heart. 

    From the Jazz Singer on,
    there’s nothing funny about Blackface.

    Hear me now,
    no one is laughing.

  • Rini

    I really can’t tell you what I think about the video. If I had a translation I could form an opinion more easily. Although as far as I could tell, the audience was laying at the man with the glasses more than the girls who are in blackface. The girls in blackface had lip syncing that was off (one of them seemed to know the lyrics though) but this is not the most offensive thing I have seen since the time I started becoming interested in Korean culture.

    I think the Kikwang blackface incident was more offensive with the over exaggerated lips and the watermelon. And the Bubble Sisters, well, that just speaks for itself really.

    What bothers me more than the ignorance on the part of those directly involved is how international fans react to these incidents. I can’t speak for the Korean fans because I really don’t know what they are saying, but with the incident with Kikwang, fans brushed it off with “oppa didn’t mean it” and a lot of times things like this escalate into discussions about how black people can be too sensitive.

    I can’t tell you how many times I have seen Kpop fans use the n-word to refer to Teddy Riley, and yet, in the wake of the recent “Kids React to Kpop” video, there are so many fans jumping all over those children, calling them racists, when in reality, nothing the kids said was really that bad. Or even the Morning Musume example you brought up. It’s ridiculous to believe that it’s okay to ridicule anyone, however the second anyone says anything that could be misconstrued to be offensive towards Koreans/Asians it’s all of a sudden unacceptable. That is the double standard that bothers me the most with the Kpop fandom.

  • Nailahp

    Geezus, if they want to “honor” us, which I doubt is the case, how about they reenact something from our culture, or wear something we normally would. So, really? Can you people NOT think? Is that hard for you? 
    Get your SHIT together, SNL! 

  • Nailahp

    Geezus, if they want to “honor” us, which I doubt is the case, how about they reenact something from our culture, or wear something we normally would. So, really? Can you people NOT think? Is that hard for you? 
    Get your SHIT together, SNL! 

  • Its_3lizab3th

    SNL Korea released an apology on their twitter: http://twitpic.com/85jn72

    • Rini

      I think it’s nice that they acknowledged it and apologized. I really do. I would call this progress.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Anngelica-Aguilar/100000185514336 Anngelica Aguilar

      Boom did the same thing before. Took part in blackface and then apologized. So this doesn’t really show me anything.

      • Its_3lizab3th

        really? I didn’t know. I thought this was the first time they were actually apologizing for blackface. If they know it’s wrong, why do they keep doing it? smh…

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Anngelica-Aguilar/100000185514336 Anngelica Aguilar

          Yep. And same story with Kikwang from Beast. That’s why I don’t take their apologies into consideration. If they were seriously sorry they’d stop doing it. But looks like they don’t give a damn…. :/ 

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VHQBQS5SADT7UDA7O3OGEATDIU Erica

          Mayhap, they need to let it sink in a few more times before they get the memo.

  • ABCinSG

    It’s a parody, and if you would put aside the prejudice created by the article, you will know there’s nothing in there that is meant to be a racial insult.

    Sadly, this article has identified those who replied negatively as hot-headed, insecure individuals. Cool down, look at things from the perspective of a country far away from yours and you will notice that you have over-reacted.

    Simply put, don’t insult your intelligence by getting all worked up over this, you guys are better then that. 

    • whatthefrell

      I hear you, really I do.
      But intended as a racial insult or not, it is still unacceptable; 
      and like Confederate Flag license plate,
      black-face still stirs up a lot of images, feelings and emotions for a lot of people;
      and, as this is not the first time, had they been paying attention,
      we would not be here again discussing this.
      I am not hot headed about it, I’m just disappointed.
      I do look at it from their standpoint, however, their reach is broader now. 
      This is just another one of those “teachable” moments.
      Maybe now they will finally listen and learn.

      • whatthefrell

        From the Twitter apology:
        “we will do our utmost to adopt a broader perspective
        while presenting our show”

        See, that’s all we ask,
        live and learn…

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VHQBQS5SADT7UDA7O3OGEATDIU Erica

          And that’s progress!

    • Seriously?

      First of all how is this not offensive? If you pull back the corner of your eyes and offer to do laundry or cook Lo mein I’m pretty sure asians would be offended because you ate mocking their race. Parady or not this isn’t the first time.Korea has done this and they need to known of they want to expand their market blackface and terrorists skits arent going to help.
      Not only is this racist but it is demeaning to the black culture and it will always be demeaning and if you can’t see that then you must be somewhat racially challenged and ignorant

      • Anashaitha

        you are totally right…how many years do black people have to go through the same insults. Imitating an accent or a language doesn’t compare when someone go to the point of painting their faces, it is riciculous, and embarrassing thing for me to watch and think that it is entertaning. should we always be the ones who are supposed to turn the other cheek? it is degrading and infuriating to be minimized like that. 

        • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VHQBQS5SADT7UDA7O3OGEATDIU Erica

          And how many years do Asians have to go through insults as well? Seriously? Imitaing an accent doesn’t compare? Are you kidding me? My husband, who is Chinese, is automatically considered a foreigner in this country BECAUSE of the racial stereotypes of language even though he is an American citizen by birth! What the holy hell…Please stop, Black people. No, seriously, please stop.

          Black people, Asians, Hispanics and yes, even White people, are discriminated against, every single day. So, how about this? Let’s just stop the discrimination right now. Let’s stop being victims and stop blaming other races or marginalizing what other races are going thorugh and just see ourselves as people. Can we do that?

  • zowachie

    i may be out of the topic but..the picture at the top is Nicole Fox!!! haha just sayin XD

  • Ebbiechan37

    As being a black female watching this skit, I really wasn’t that offended. To me, black face is when you put on very dark paint, really overdraw your lips, and do something extremely stereotypical. In this skit, however, they did none of that.

    • guest

      As a black female your comment offends me because its that easy going mentality towards those situations whether or not its super stereotypical or if the paint is darker that allows it to continue. PS.black people come in all different shades.

      • http://twitter.com/teenwoolf ღღ (ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻ ღღ

        They look Samoan to me, as a black female of course (just had to point that out, everyone seems to be doing it)

        • http://twitter.com/flavoni09 FLKoloamatangi

          Haha really? As a Polynesian, they do not look Samoan to me….

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100003130702713 Lina Rules

          Not even close. 

        • a n

          Black or “Samoan,” they are still dark skinned. It’s still the issue of making fun of someone of a different race and getting away with it because they are not White.

          • kyungmoo

            woah bro, calm the downs this was nearly 2 year ago!! hhaa smoke the weeds, eat the foods, calm the downs……

    • BlingerLocket

      hye,,i know this has nothing related with your comment at all, but i need to ask this, are you writing in Asian FF? bcoz i’ve seen a writer with your name as hers,,and she’s a black female too,,so i wonder if you are her,,

      • Ebbiechan37

        yea thats me

    • a n

      Yeah typical, it’s because they were Asian. If they were White all hell would break lose, as well as people like you. Where is your integrity?

  • http://twitter.com/DarknessIsMask Ryan Unmole

    They apologized after I see… 
    http://twitpic.com/85jn72

  • http://darkfire-382.tumblr.com Kakurayami Reika

    I really don’t think this is a racial insult in any way. They didn’t really do anything that I would call an insult in my opinion. If someone else feels offended, that’s their own opinion. But seriously think about this: How many times have we imitated an Asian person by making a mockery of their accent when speaking English or by “attempting to speak Chinese” for fun? Besides, it’s SNL. They imitate and make fun of everyone. 

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/FHTR6UCX5SPMPQMELKGCKQLCIE PanDuh

      Obviously you dont understand the history of blackface. 

      • flgarph

        i think u hit the nail on the head.  it’s ignorance.  having spent most of my life in the states i know it’s considered offensive, but don’t really know the history behind it.  whereas ppl who didn’t grow up in diverse culture might not even know it is racially insensitive.  hopefully thru knowledge come understanding and empathy for ppl who are different from onself. 
        p.s. knowing the history or not i never found things like that funny.

        • http://darkfire-382.tumblr.com Kakurayami Reika

          Ignorance, you say? Since you’re obviously not the ignorant one here I suppose it wasn’t ignorant to assume that I didn’t grow up in a diverse culture. Never did I state that it was funny. “…empathy for ppl who are different from onself”, you say? I’m Caribbean-American thank you very much. 

      • http://darkfire-382.tumblr.com Kakurayami Reika

        Obviously you don’t understand the meaning of the word “opinion”. If my comment gave the impression that I didn’t know of the history of blackface, think again. 

    • a n

      Double standard, that’s the issue.

  • Keymerr(:

    OH, you think this is funny? You’re the one losing international fans. Who’s laughing now?
    Now that we’re in 2012, I would have thought people would have already stopped paying attention to the color of peoples skin. Its a fucking color. Get over it.
    I would of thought that you koreans/asians would know better than to do something like this, because i’ve always thought of you as a calm people. And Ive trusted asians more than other races like whites, hispanics, and blacks, me being black myself, 15 years old.
    After watching this it just makes me angry, but i dont feel racial insulted. Its just disturbing to have your race mocked like that.
    I know you apologized already, but if you thought this was funny then you have an odd sense of humor.

    • NongDok

      Way to generalize a larger diverse population because of three Korean girls. As if somehow every Asian person, from Mongolians to the Brao tribes of Central Laos, are to blame for your anguish.

      But then again, you’re 15, you don’t know better.

      • whatthefrell

        “from Mongolians to the Brao tribes of Central Laos”
        that was good!

        You have a point — I am an older black female.
        I would hope that as Keymerr gets older, is more traveled and well-read,
        such generalizations will wane.  But I can relate to the overwhelming
        disappointment Keymerr is feelingl.  But keep in mind, people will always disappoint you.  They key is to always make an effort to keep an open mind.

        “Politics, racism, religion. The division and destruction of mankind!”

        As much as it makes sense to all of us not to judge others based on the colour of their skin, the politics they preach or the God(s) that they worship,
        the fact remains that we are still an ignorant, divided peoples. 
        Forums such as this are as much about educating and informing,
        as they are about fan-girrrling and fame-whoring.

      • Sassymb

        Politics,racism,religion< The divison and destruction of mankind!
        People
        degrade others to build themselves up.People who do that really have a
        low self-esteem. There is but one race and that's the human race.
        Some
        of the everyday things that they come to depend on were invented by
        africans/african americans. The music that make them popular was adapted
        from africans/african americans. Those koreans that insult other
        cultures are truly the uneducated stupid ones.
        Like Reply

  • Sassymb

    Politics,racism,religion< The divison and destruction of mankind!
    People degrade others to build themselves up.People who do that really have a low self-esteem. There is but one race and that's the human race.
    Some of the everyday things that they come to depend on were invented by africans/african americans. The music that make them popular was adapted from africans/african americans. Those koreans that insult other cultures are truly the uneducated stupid ones.

  • Hlsa18

    pft if u think abt it everyone mocks everyone else’s race…just some tend to be more sensitive…asians(chinese in particular) have been mocked in western culture since forever…and black people make fun of white ass sissy people as well in their movies…all races have differences and a little healthy mocking here and there is healthy…i’m a chinese and i cudnt care less if someone decided to mock the way our eyes look…as long as it doesnt go to downright disturbing a little humor is good…people have to learn to get over themselves already….p.s.black people are NOT the only ones mocked…and they ALSO mock others..

    • Benada

      mocking is fine as long as it doesn’t cross the line. Do u know the history behind the black face? if u don’t u should get yourself informed. it would have been funnier if it was 3 actual black people, that’s how we do it. we all went through this and that’s true, but it is not funny when u have history behind a mockery.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VHQBQS5SADT7UDA7O3OGEATDIU Erica

        Oh, please. Do you know the history of ‘yellow’ face? How about the typical skit of chinky-eyed, buck-toothed Asian medicine man that was really popular back in the 40s and 50s cartoons in the US? Please stop acting like Black people have the market cornered on racial inequality. We don’t. EVERY race that isn’t white has been degraded and bastardized by American media, and even media abroad. The only difference is, Black people are more vocal about their indignation.

        I’m not saying it was right, but please stop with the indignation and victimization. Maybe you should get yourself informed on the full gamut of racial inequality and racism in the US before you start popping off at the mouth.

        • http://www.facebook.com/naanorle AlwaysaFighter Noi

          so we should give them a pass because they got racist remarks too?  sorry but that don’t fly with me, I think both floyd mayweather and jenny hyun are some ignorant asses because as much shit as both races went through you’d think they’d each be more opened minded…and its not possible to commit victimization on ourself by ourself .  victimization about someone offending you…the definition of victimize is to push around, take advantage of and bully, so there has to be an aggressor and while it may exist in all races, doesn’t excuse what they did here.  It takes two to tango

    • Benada

      mocking is fine as long as it doesn’t cross the line. Do u know the history behind the black face? if u don’t u should get yourself informed. it would have been funnier if it was 3 actual black people, that’s how we do it. we all went through this and that’s true, but it is not funny when u have history behind a mockery.

  • Taemoni

    There’s not a perfect person that walks this earth !
    Our true colors are under our skin and we are all the same.
    There’s the good, bad and ugly in all of us. Therefore we need to stop putting each other down and focus on how to build this world up to be something we all can be proud of.How about us focusing on stopping hunger and poverty  around the world. Let use our resources and let our voices be  heard by government. This skit on SNL is just another one of those distractions  done by medias all around the world to distract  people from knowing what mess our lives are really being made of by those we put in office.

    • a n

      People in the West are sick to death of double standard in 1st world countries, that’s what the outrage is. If we can’t agree on that, we can’t agree on anything.

    • a n

      People in the West are sick to death of double standard in 1st world countries, that’s what the outrage is. If we can’t agree on that, we can’t agree on anything.

    • a n

      People in the West are sick to death of double standard in 1st world countries, that’s what the outrage is. If we can’t agree on that, we can’t agree on anything.

    • a n

      People in the West are sick to death of double standard in 1st world countries, that’s what the outrage is. If we can’t agree on that, we can’t agree on anything.

    • a n

      People in the West are sick to death of double standard in 1st world countries, that’s what the outrage is. If we can’t agree on that, we can’t agree on anything.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_VHQBQS5SADT7UDA7O3OGEATDIU Erica

    I think if they did that people wouold still get offended: they would ask: why didn’t they hire REAL black people to play the part? They would say: SKoreans don’t have any context for what their doing. How could they? They would also say: Now, that’s just downright offensive! I don’t like that!

    It’s a slippery slope.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_CGTXZZZBDKVMPLML5ZIPGT7IOY Trouser Trout

     Get over yourself. Its 2012, that “I’m offended by everything” and “all whites are guilty” shit was over when we got Obama. He proved that it takes hard work to achieve great things. Yet you choose to lambaste all other races while you lay around waiting for handouts.
     These girls were imitating performers they admire. You turn this innocent flattery into some form of hatred. Your ignorance is typical.
     Put down the grape soda, get your donkey-booty off the couch, and go explore the world outside of your projects. The 21st Century, and the rest of the world, will embrace you. The only person that hates you……is you.
     If you can’t follow the above advice, I suggest this: STFU.
     

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/MMRQEZEPSNJ26LJ7XJNDDM5NCI JasmineA

      Just because Obama is president does not mean that black people don’t still struggle, it doesn’t mean that Obama has never struggled. If that were the case than all white people in America should be rich since we have had 43 white presidents. Your statement makes no sense at all. And I love how you want to pretend that racism doesn’t exist and that it’s all in our heads while at the same time saying the most bluntly racist stereotypical things. “Put down the grape soda”, yeah grow up, your just making yourself look stupid.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZM5FVXVIER2262DXWIXKV2MRWQ Sgs

    eh im sick of asian criticism from whites and asians bowing and going soo sorry! go criticize spain who has entertainers on the streets with blackface on the daily and no one says crap, not even the brazilians that live there.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/K7M2DSPTF6EWMAGPVSIIYL6H2E Nathaniel G

    I’m just boggled by the Korean obsession with “blackface”.  Why do they feel they must do this?  I guess the best way to protest is hit them in the wallet.  Do not buy Korean products.  Boycott K-Pop and these Jenny Hyun types.  Fight back with protest on the street and in Television.  Write your congressman.  Korea wants to go international.  So did Apartheid South Africa.  That didn’t happen until apartheid was dismantled and South Africa got a clue.  You could make fun of Japanese Korean Comfort Women or put on Nerd Glasses, Buck Teeth and make your eyes slanted for pay back, but thats’ wrong.  That would put you on their level.  Korea has no problem staging mass protests against American policies they do not like, we can do the same.  Perhaps this will bring the message home, instead of waiting for something like the LA Riots to happen again.  Not hating on Korea. I have a Korean girlfriend, but the disrespect line has to be drawn somewhere.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/JALDGFPZOD7WT7UVT334TVZT64 Free Shijia

       Oh please…
      “Boycott K-pop” How many American even know about K-pop to begin with?
      “Apartheid South Africa” Korea is not in Africa; there are not ethnic black Koreans; there are no Apartheid policies against black people in Korea. What are you on about?
      “…protests against American policies they do not like, we can do the same.” Since when did a tv skit become the Policy of the Republic of Korea?
      “the disrespect line” What disrespect. So if a Ugandan group was broadcasted singing to popular K-pop while in Yellow face, Koreans should be offended?

  • tunaa

    So its ok for the American SNL to do racist jokes against Asians when all that Jeremy Lin stuff was going on.. or when a white lady was playing a full blown stereotypical Asian lady on Madtv? But the minute it has something to do with black people it’s a race issue. Give me a break, its comedy, get over it!

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JALDGFPZOD7WT7UVT334TVZT64 Free Shijia

     In the early days of American theatre, actors on stage were exclusively white. White actors would don on ‘blackfaces’ and ‘yellow faces’ to play mostly stereotyped and racial caricatures of blacks and asians. This was continued into the golden age of cinema, where it was unacceptable to put a minority person in front of a camera. In the historical context of white oppression of minorities in the USA, painting one’s face black is considered racist in America. That said. The world is bigger than just America and it does not simply revolve around Americans – including African Americans. Korea is on the other side of the planet, it has no native black people, it did not participate in the persecution of Africans in America or Korea, it did not have a policy of banning blacks from it’s media and substituting them with Koreans made up in black. It’s ‘black’ exposure has been very recent and limited to very positive assimilation of music and fashion. So a Korean production has broadcasted a Korean show to Korean viewers, of Korean singers singing popular music from a black band in black makeup. How in the world would this be the same the terrible black-face that occurred in America? If a boy in Cambodia who’s hooked on Usher wishes to paint his skin black to emulate his idol, why should anyone question his action or even mention Jim Crow? If a martial art enthusiast from Trinidad wished to paint himself yellow while demonstrating crazy Bruce Lee moves, why should anyone bring up the fact that Bruce Lee was replaced by a white guy in the Kung Fu series.
    I think Blackface has left a terrible legacy. One’s skin color is very personal and something to be very proud of. White Americans had copied the black color in the past to make a mockery of it for African Americans, so now making one’s skin black is considered a terrible thing. It absolutely shouldn’t be! It should be a source of pride that people of other cultures are holding you as model. The Ganguru (literally blackface in Japanese) girls made black skin cool in Japan for decades. That’s the way blackface should be; not a badge of past humiliation, but a symbol of black-mania.

    • http://www.facebook.com/roy.yoon.777 Roy Yoon

      I thank you for your superb reasoning behind what the main article was talking about…I don’t think one should do black face…however, to force other countries to assimilate to American standard is arrogant and idiotic. One must realize as Shija said, it should come off as a form of flattery. People in American should stop thinking they are the center of the pop culture universe…with that said, as global brand that K-pop is becoming, they need to study other countries’ sensitivities. I think Korea will become a truly global phenom without these kind of minor incidents if Korean broadcasters and entertainers are taught what is acceptable in other countries.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1290948675 Steve Calder

    Darkening an actor’s skin to play a televised role in Korea does not have the same cultural connotations there as it has in the US, because Korea is a different country with a different history.  There is racism in South Korea, mainly due to racial homogeneity as a consequence of (until relatively recently) centuries of geographic isolation.  It seems to me that the comedy show, by limiting the degree to which the actors’ skin was darkened, was actually attempting to avoid making a jab at race and was simply trying to make the women look the part.  Braids and dreadlocks are expensive to effectively fake and are too time-consuming and damaging to one’s hair to do for realsies, so it makes sense that the studio would have forgone messing with their hair for a short comedy skit.

  • julie

    um….i’m korean and I was raised in America but I’m living in Korea now. I think you’re being way too sensitive about this. Nobody in Korea was laughing AT the “blackface”. They weren’t trying to offend black ppl in any way. And nobody with a right mind openly be racist about black people except for some uneducated old folks. They’re the “Dream girls” have you seen dream girls????? if they didnt do the makeup like that how the hell would anybody know what they’re trying to show us? Please tell me.

  • Cheyenne_Lin

    america did the same thing (dressing up white people as blacks because we didnt want black actors, or taping back peoples eyes instead of using asian actors/actresses). now korea is doing the same thing. korea i feel is stuck in the 1950s socially but they have the technology of like 2050. it’s an interesting mix. but discovering this in modern day society is extremely unnerving for someone who loves korea as much as i do. i respect skorea a lot and understand why they think this is funny (due to the lack of exposure to dark skinned people) but to the rest of the world and to me they look ignorant and this shows how much they need to start letting that 1950s ignorance go and start educating themselves about different cultures other than their own.