• http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001510115578 Asela Cheung

    I have mixed feelings about this. I mean I’m against plastic surgery because of useless reasons like being more beautiful yet would cool similar to everyone else. I mean, if people who went under the knife and likes their face like that then I have no complaints about it. 

  • http://twitter.com/mos6142 mos

    reveal what you are comfortable with. does not make you less or more of a person. its what an individual should be comfortable with.

    *there, didn’t need a 993 word post*

  • http://logton.tumblr.com/ Jasmin Davis

    Honesty tends to be the best policy, but with plastic surgery, it’s hard to tell. The purpose of plastic surgery is to change the structure and appearance of the body, often used cosmetically by celebrities to look ‘better’. A standard must have existed before the surgery of what they (or the company) found to be attractive. Such standards exist within ideal types, such as Yoona: big eyes, S-line, small nose, pointed chin, etc. 

    To be honest about plastic surgery is showcasing your insecurity, silently stating that what you were born with was not up to your (or society’s) standards. I appreciate when celebrities are honest about plastic surgery, but it shouldn’t matter whether or not they are open about it.

    K-pop is already built on superficial appearance, with idols maintaining an image where ever they go. They keep a professional and personal life separate. Plastic surgery exposes a character flaw and destroys that idol image of being ‘perfect’. Because of the standards that they’re professional life dictates, it’s best to keep it a secret. It’s best to maintain that image to keep themselves safely in the limelight.

    I find that with their age, Brown Eyed Girls have no trouble admitting it. They are grown and matured adults who have come and gone through the celebrity spotlight. Being honest really expresses their maturity with the subject and understanding and growth of it.

    I find older artists are able to be much more honest than newer ones. Plastic surgery is a part of the business. In a utopia, a person could talk about it openly without facing scrutiny from both fans and the media. We don’t live in such a world, and plastic surgery is only discussed and performed under the table, especially when celebrities are littered with ‘image’. I don’t believe celebrities can be honest until we either drop the ‘idol’ title, or when their established or irrelevant.

  • http://twitter.com/M_Wys Michaela Wylie

    I love that they’re honest, I really do, but I worry that there aren’t any natural, non-plastic, confident celebrities for young girls to look up to. Call me old-fashioned, but I’ve always been taught that you should love and accept who you are. Which means no plastic surgery. I’m worried that young girls are too pressured to get plastic surgery to adhere to Korea’s beauty standards. I don’t know. I do really appreciate B.E.G.’s honesty and all, but the concept of plastic surgery is just one that I don’t agree with. :/

    • jesuis2

      Kim Tae hee, Shin Min ah, Lee Yeon hee, Yoon Eun hye, Song Hyo gyo, Suzy, Hyori, Jeon Ji hyun, Park Ha sun, Han Ga in, Han Hyo joo, Ham Ye seul, Han Ji min, Moon Geun young, Sandara, and the list goes on and on.
      Also, have all the cute child actresses.

    • TaeyeonFTW

      But BEG don’t look like eveyone else, they are totally unqiue looking.

  • kpopfan6

    The sad thing about BEG (and many other idols) is that I think they looked better BEFORE they had plastic surgery. There was nothing wrong with them in the first place so it seems like such a waste. 

    Too many people turn to PS as a means to build their self confidence or (magically) make their lives better, but that’s not good. Even if you do end up looking gorgeous you’ll still probably be insecure or have problems with your life that have nothing to do with your appearance. That’s why some people get addicted to PS– because instead of fixing internal issues they keep focusing on their looks.

    Well, if you want to get PS then fine. But it’s usually unnecessary and I don’t think it truly helps people in the long run.

    • http://twitter.com/M_Wys Michaela Wylie

      Yeah, I’ve always thought that getting PS could actually make you more insecure. Because you’d constantly be wondering if people liked the “real” you or only liked you for your appearance.

      That’s what I’d feel like, at least.

    • http://www.facebook.com/chibijoshie Josh Chinnery

      I really do love B.E.G for being honest about this, but they aren’t the kind of the people I want my kids to be looking up to. Call me narrow minded if you wanna, but I want them to realize that whatever looks they have are enough, and that their “beauty” isn’t their selling point. B.E.G are pretty damn talented, and I respect them for openly admitting that they aren’t ashamed of their plastic surgery (honesty really is the best policy), but I just can’t look at them the same…

  • pg13247

    While it would be nice to have the “Be Yourself and Natural Look” be the norm in entertainment, it doesn’t work in an appearance-based culture. That’s the issue that needs to change and not honesty towards the use of PS or not. (This is needed though, to tell people that celebrity beauty is probably crafted.)

    So let’s say PS is gone and now we have celebrities that are natural beauties. What will that tell people who aren’t naturally beautiful? Too bad?
    An entertainment world based on talent is the ideal, but people can be shallow and would prefer to watch pretty people which results in this drive for everyone to look “beautiful”. PS most likely won’t help issues in the long run, but what is the alternative? (For now, pure talent just can’t beat someone who has average abilities but a pretty face) 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/3O73S4PB7NZRSRVPOOCIH3ZG34 Susan

    Plastic surgery is a personal decision and none of my business, but seeing young girls get surgery, when they haven’t even grown into their looks, makes me uncomfortable. Whenever I read stories about parents getting their teenage daughters plastic surgery as a gift or companies pressuring their trainees to get work done I feel like vomiting.
    I just don’t like how Korea has such a narrow definition of beauty. They have an ideal for every facial feature, every body part and it’s rather disconcerting.

  • Fatricia Fatlegs (Trish Okeke)

    SNSD BETTER DO THIS ONE TOO.

    • jesuis2

      Why?  Only about a 3rd of them got any work done.

  • http://www.m-rated.tumblr.com/ Michelle Chin

    I have nothing against plastic surgery but to see what most teens celebrate as uljjangs having similar faces, be it due to plastic surgery or a result of photoshopping is truly disheartening. It’s like the macdonaldization of beauty (i mean have you look at how similar they look?) and this is partly attributed to self insecurity, influence from the entertainment industry that claims that their stars are natural, which we know is pretty much bullshit, and the rampant lookism in the society. I remembered a time when I had super bad acne and I wrote about it on my now defunct blog. Because of that post alone, I received emails from models to white collar workers who are on their way to promotion writing about how their superiors demand that they fix their skin or else they could lose their jobs. It’s so sad. And that’s just acne. Considering the severe lookism in South Korea, I can imagine why people choose to get plastic surgery. :( but there’s stigma associated with plastic surgery too. While people prefer to look at pretty things they prefer it to be natural or you may be called a plastic monster. I’ve discussed this issue with friends who had plastic surgery and they said that they’re alright with tweaking but not necessarily remodel the entire face to look like someone else. One of them raise the issue of angelababy and Janice man who are famous pseudo models who had work done on their face and ended up looking like each other! Kinda bad considering that the modeling industry demands uniqueness and not uniformity in looks. Almost as bad as the faux pas of wearing the same clothes with your best friends.

    • bang2tang

      I think Angela baby is natural apart from orthodontic brace, if you see her childhood pic

  • destinyanglin

    I would feel like crap if everyone kept telling me i’m so beautiful after i’ve done plastic surgery. It would just feel like they are putting down all of the shortcomings my previous face had by praising all the manufactured features i now have.

  • destinyanglin

    I would feel like crap if everyone kept telling me i’m so beautiful after i’ve done plastic surgery. It would just feel like they are putting down all of the shortcomings my previous face had by praising all the manufactured features i now have.

  • destinyanglin

    I would feel like crap if everyone kept telling me i’m so beautiful after i’ve done plastic surgery. It would just feel like they are putting down all of the shortcomings my previous face had by praising all the manufactured features i now have.

  • destinyanglin

    I would feel like crap if everyone kept telling me i’m so beautiful after i’ve done plastic surgery. It would just feel like they are putting down all of the shortcomings my previous face had by praising all the manufactured features i now have.

  • destinyanglin

    I would feel like crap if everyone kept telling me i’m so beautiful after i’ve done plastic surgery. It would just feel like they are putting down all of the shortcomings my previous face had by praising all the manufactured features i now have.

  • inxomnia

    I love that they have the confidence to not be affected by people’s criticism and that they’re brave out to point out the hypocrisy with plastic surgery. However, it’s saddening that it has come to this. I mean, Korea as a society has such unattainable and slightly unnatural standards of beauty and those who don’t look a certain way are made to feel bad about themselves, with so many reminders of what’s the ideal beauty. I don’t think Koreans are all born with natural double eyelids, and so many people get it done that it isn’t even regarded by many as “going under the knife”, even things like fillers and injections are overlooked as being “cosmetic surgery” when in reality they kind of are: they significantly change and distort how you look like. Arguably many people can say make up does the same thing, but on a lesser extent and is erasable on a daily basis. 

    I think this desensitization to plastic surgery is disheartening because it encourages young females and males to not accept any flaws and be okay in their own skin, no, they are encouraged to go out and actively seek t FIX that flaw by plastic surgery. At the end of it, everyone’s got something done, minor or major, and everyone resembles one another. I can’t even begin to list the amount of people who look similar in KPOP, nor am I able to differentiate any newcomers by first glance. 

  • Chocho268

    ‘So even though they may have similar facial proportions to others now at
    least they have the proportions that South Korean culture sees as
    beautiful’

    What if SK society suddenly changes its beauty ideals-would you then adjust your face according to those ideals just so you can accept yourself and feel you are a worthy human being? This makes no sense to me.

    Also, I heard a lot of women say they feel happy once they underwent plastic surgery-I know a lot of ppl might disagree with me but I don’t think that something as changing your looks can bring you real peace and joy within yourself. A temporary and superficial happiness? Probably. Just my two cents..

  • happy_slip

    If only it was that easy to admit plastic surgery in a country like Korea. I live in a country where people don’t obsess much on looks as much as this country does, and yet people who go through cosmetic procedures here still get some kind of flak and critical judgement from other people. What more in a country where physical appearance is valued so highly?   

    A person openly admitting that they had some work done is refreshing, yes, but I personally don’t think it will greatly solve the real issue here. Come to think of it, would it greatly change things for them, would most people around them truly be less harsh on them had they just told the truth? 

  • Bess Li

    I think the problem with south korea is that they have a very narrow definition of what beauty is. If you do not fit with their ‘criteria’ then you’re out. I believe that this issue of plastic surgery with S.K is something that has passed on from generation to generation with their obsession over the perfect proportion and whatnot. I once saw a documentary about students in S.K and the girls were actually talking about so and so who got plastic surgery over the summer break. The girl even said that her mum never called her ‘pretty’ until she got her double eyelid surgery. I don’t know about you, but I think that the obsession over beauty is downright disturbing and unhealthy. I’ve even heard from my Korean friends that it is the norm for parents to allow their child to go for ps as a present for graduating.

    I think the only thing that I’d ever be okay with about PS would be the double eyelid surgery. I feel that PS is okay if you use it to enhance, and not alter/modify your face completely. Besides, a lot of the  PS comes with its health risks and as much as you yearn to fit into society’s standards of being beautiful, it is simply not ok for one to throw away what their parents have bestowed them upon.

    Imo, it would be a lot better if more celebs admit to having PS. What a lot of young people don’t understand these days is that without the plastic surgery, photoshop, professional make-up artists and personal fitness trainers, celebs would not look like what they look on the magazine covers. As such, they go through unhealthy means (starving themselves/ps etc..) in order to attain the ‘perfect look’. What’s even worse is that many celebs like to play it down and say things like ‘Oh, we actually eat a lot and that includes junk food too…’, further misleading their fans into thinking that such beauty and only be attainable through getting work done as they’re not ‘goddesses’ like their idols.

    This obsession with beauty needs to stop. Though I don’t see it happening anytime soon, I do hope that it will gradually fade or tone down. I still remember how I went to the salon a month ago and saw a korean mom getting her 5-yr old son a digital perm. *Shudders* I just don’t get why 5-yr olds need to get perms. Talk about damaging your hair at a young age.

  • Bess Li

    I think the problem with south korea is that they have a very narrow definition of what beauty is. If you do not fit with their ‘criteria’ then you’re out. I believe that this issue of plastic surgery with S.K is something that has passed on from generation to generation with their obsession over the perfect proportion and whatnot. I once saw a documentary about students in S.K and the girls were actually talking about so and so who got plastic surgery over the summer break. The girl even said that her mum never called her ‘pretty’ until she got her double eyelid surgery. I don’t know about you, but I think that the obsession over beauty is downright disturbing and unhealthy. I’ve even heard from my Korean friends that it is the norm for parents to allow their child to go for ps as a present for graduating.

    I think the only thing that I’d ever be okay with about PS would be the double eyelid surgery. I feel that PS is okay if you use it to enhance, and not alter/modify your face completely. Besides, a lot of the  PS comes with its health risks and as much as you yearn to fit into society’s standards of being beautiful, it is simply not ok for one to throw away what their parents have bestowed them upon.

    Imo, it would be a lot better if more celebs admit to having PS. What a lot of young people don’t understand these days is that without the plastic surgery, photoshop, professional make-up artists and personal fitness trainers, celebs would not look like what they look on the magazine covers. As such, they go through unhealthy means (starving themselves/ps etc..) in order to attain the ‘perfect look’. What’s even worse is that many celebs like to play it down and say things like ‘Oh, we actually eat a lot and that includes junk food too…’, further misleading their fans into thinking that such beauty and only be attainable through getting work done as they’re not ‘goddesses’ like their idols.

    This obsession with beauty needs to stop. Though I don’t see it happening anytime soon, I do hope that it will gradually fade or tone down. I still remember how I went to the salon a month ago and saw a korean mom getting her 5-yr old son a digital perm. *Shudders* I just don’t get why 5-yr olds need to get perms. Talk about damaging your hair at a young age.

    • jesuis2

      Oh please, there are universal features desirable in women - large eyes, a pert nose, high cheek bones and full lips.
       
      Why do you think a nose job, collagen lip implants and eyelid surgeries are 3 of the most common cosmetic procedures in the US?
       
      Having large eyes isn’t desirable in guys (it’s actually preferable to have smaller eyes, such as Brad Pitt – which is seen as being more masculine) so there really isn’t an issue w/ Korean and other Asian males regarding that.
       
      And don’t give me that Korea has only a narrow definition of beauty (it’s not different than anywhere else).

      Kim Tae hee looks little like Song Hye gyo or Shin Min ah or Han Ga in or Han Ji hye, etc.

      In fact, Korea (like the rest of Asia) has a broader definition of beauty when it comes to male celebs – from the uber masculine looks of a Kim Sung soo and Oh Ji ho to the more androgynous look of a Lee Jung ki or a Jung Il woo.

      How many white starlets in Hollywood do you see who are thick/overweight, have small, beady eyes and large, broad noses?

      In fact, the black actresses who get the most parts tend to have lighter skin, straight long hair, taller/narrower noses.

      There’s a reason Jennifer Aniston got a nose job.  In fact many Hollywood actresses have gotten work done (it’s just not as scrutinized as in Korea).

       
       

      • find_nothing_here

        But what about normal people in the United States?  When you look at the statistics it seems that Korean women are a lot more driven to that sort of thing.

        And for the last damn time: there is no universal standard of beauty and there will not be until there is a universal culture.  Beauty is subjective.  Biology has made us favor features like big eyes because they look babyish, but there is nothing biologically advantageous about high cheek bones.  That doesn’t explain the shifting beauty ideals throughout the world.

        The problem with the Korean standard is that it is essentially imported.  Caucasian women (who are very varying in looks) will have some of the features you mentioned to some extent.  (Not that I think what they are doing is healthy either, because it isn’t.)  But in an ethnically homogenous country such as Korea, the v-line and double eyelids are a lot less common.

        Not to mention that historical beauty ideals in Korea were focused on much more natural features, such as a round face.

        • jesuis2

          As I had stated, the basic ideal features are universal.

          High cheek bones, which are more prevalent in NE Asians, are desirable b/c it is just a more aesthetically pleasing look.

          The ideal head shape for a female is the heart shape – so it’s not that different from being round (too narrow of a face and one gets to the “horse face” look like Sarah Jessica Parker).

          And no, the Korean standard isn’t imported. North Koreans value the same types of features and South Korean women want dbl eyelids like Kim Tae hee, Hyori, Song Hye gyo, Shin Min ah, etc. – as I had stated NE Asian dbl eyelids are DIFFERENT from Caucasian dbl eyelids.

          One of the most desired features in Asian females is the “eye smile” (Hyori, Tiffany) – that’s not feature really found in Caucasian women.

          Korean women want to look like the top Korean beauties, not white women – so they want to emulate those features.

          As I had stated, just b/c many white females get collagen to plump their lips doesn’t mean they want to look “Asian” or “black” – they just want to look like other WFs who have full lips since its a desirable trait (and btw, there is no biological advantage in having full lips other than its aesthetically pleasing nature which can draw mates).

          And cosmetic procedures on a per capita basis is more common in places like Korea, Japan, HK and increasingly in major cities of China b/c it is much more competitive.

          Also, the vast majority of Koreans live in urban centers.

          Korea is basically like NYC, LA, Miami and Dallas – with a small % living in rural areas.

          What do you think is the % of women in those cities who get some work done?

          • find_nothing_here

            No they aren’t. You have no authority to just say that these standards of beauty are universal when you’ve obviously never studied cultures where the standard of beauty differ. Or even histories. Years ago, being heavier was attractive. It isn’t now. Years ago, it was considered sexy for women to have a small gap between their teeth.

            Look at the drawings of Korean beauties before European contact. I guarantee that they will have rounder faces, single eyelids, and no cheekbone definition. Kim Tae hee and Lee Hyori are considered ideal because they naturally have some western features

            Aesthetically pleasing is defined by culture just as it is defined by species.

            And London, Berlin, or Paris as well? I’m sure plastic surgery is more prevalent in large urban areas because it’s not like these people can set up things in the country. But that still doesn’t explain the prevalence in Korea as compared to Japan or China. (Not to mention some people credit the Hallyu wave with spreading ideas about plastic surgery to the rest of Eastern Asia.)

      • bang2tang

        no Korean people do not like they natural high cheek bone, that’s why a lot of them shave their cheekbone

  • DeeJun

    Being brought up in the United Kingdom has taught me to accept my cultural identity and it seems so strange to me that young South Korean women to want to alter their looks to the extent that they do not look oriental. I think South Korea really needs to do something about their sense of identity instead of just pressurising young girls into thinking that they have to look a certain way when they are beautiful just the way they are.

    • Momostar

      i completely agree with you , i really think the pressure girls get is too much in South Korea i founf it very strange when i first got into kpop . Omg i’m from the Uk too :) Hiii ( London to be exact)

    • jesuis2

      What’s looking Asian/Oriental?

      Many Koreans and other NE Asians have natural dbl eyelids and high bridged noses.

      Those who opt for surgery want to look like those Koreans (say, a Kim Tae hee or a Song Hye gyo).

      And it’s not just a Korean thing, many Chinese and other Asians go the surgeon w/ a photo of their favorite celeb (be they Korean or other Asian ethnicity).

      So why do so many white women get collagen injections to plump their lips, cheek implants and straighten their hair?

      Full lips, high cheek bones and straight hair are features commonly found in Koreans and other NE Asians - so does that mean all these white women want to look Asian?

      Also, eyelid surgery (along w/ a nose job) is one of the most common procedure in the US – and it’s white women who are getting that procedure done (not every WF is blessed w/ having that “doe-eyed” look that is so desirable).

  • shannie4888

    I love BEG and I think it’s wonderful that they spoke so openly and honestly about getting nicked and tucked. However, my problem with Korea’s infatuation with looks is that it is unhealthy. No one thinks they’re ever good enough. Reshaping beautiful, ethnic Asian features into the we-all-look-alike-with-our-big-eyes-and-high-nose-bridge syndrome is detrimental to the health of their society. Idols are always saying they feel inferior to this or that person because they are so so beautiful, when in actuality this person is just as good looking as the person they are referring to. Korea has one kind of beauty. The beauty standards are almost engraved in stone, not to mention into the heart and minds of the entire society. 

    If they continue on the path they are on, South Korea will have the highest plastic surgery rate in the world and every single person in the entire entertainment industry will have tight face, bulging eyes, and pointy noses. No one ever addresses the problems associated with plastic surgery in S. Korea. In the States, we love beauty too, but there is a fair representation of be yourself, look beautiful, and be happy with who you are. This message is not loud enough in S. Korea, unless I’m the one not hearing it of course. 

    Everyone is just chasing false beauty. I don’t want Korean children growing up feeling that their only sense of worth hinders on how they look even if they are well educated, well-mannered, and have a good character. This is the message that many Korean celebrities send. Idols are especially supposed to be good role models, and BEG are excellent role models because they are sexy and powerful when they make statements for women. However, most idols just make “happy music” with no substance, so apart from singing a catchy hook, all they have to carry them is how they look. Children pay far more attention to things than adults regonize. When youngsters watch variety shows and see this or that idol admitting or denying they’ve had plastic surgery. It sends a message that their talent, wit, and humor is not enough. They need to have false beauty to have the final “it” factor. What kind of message is that sending to young people?

    All in all, I don’t have a problem with plastic surgery because I understand that universally we all want to look and fee beautiful. At the end of the day, I am not being judged for my looks as harshly as they are. I appreciate BEG’s honesty and before plastic surgery they were just as beautiful and talented as they are now. Many idols are natural and even if they’re not, it doesn’t change the heart or mind of that person. The obsession with beauty in Korea is really thought provoking and I only wish that a country so conservative yet modern could find a similar balance in how they talk about, perceive, and promote plastic surgery.

  • shannie4888

    I love BEG and I think it’s wonderful that they spoke so openly and honestly about getting nipped and tucked. However, my problem with Korea’s infatuation with beauty is that it’s unhealthy. No one thinks they’re ever good enough. Reshaping beautiful, ethnic Asian features into the we-all-look-alike-with-our-big-eyes-and-high-nose-bridge syndrome is detrimental to the health of their society. Idols are always saying they feel inferior to this or that person because they are so so beautiful, when in actuality the person speaking is probably just as good looking as the person they are referring to. Korea has one kind of beauty. The beauty standards are almost engraved in stone, not to mention into the heart and minds of the entire society. 

    If they continue on the path they are on, South Korea will have the highest plastic surgery rate in the world and every single person in the entire entertainment industry will have tight face, bulging eyes, and pointy noses. No one ever addresses the problems associated with plastic surgery in S. Korea. In the States, we love beauty too, but there is a fair representation of: be yourself, look beautiful, and be happy with who you are. This message is not loud enough in S. Korea, unless I’m the one not hearing it of course. 

    Everyone is just chasing false beauty. I don’t want Korean children growing up feeling that their only sense of worth hinders on how they look even if they are well educated, well-mannered, and have a good character. This is the message that many Korean celebrities send. Idols are especially supposed to be good role models, and BEG are excellent role models because they are sexy and powerful when they make statements for women. However, most idols just make “happy music” with no substance, so apart from singing a catchy hook, all they have to carry them is how they look. Children pay far more attention to things than adults recognize. When youngsters watch variety shows and see this or that idol admitting or denying they’ve had plastic surgery, it sends a message that their talent, wit, and humor is not enough. They need to have false beauty to have the final “it” factor. What kind of message is that sending to young people?

    All in all, I don’t have a problem with plastic surgery and I hope anything aforementioned did not make it seem like that. I understand that attractiveness is a universal desire as we all want to look and feel beautiful. At the end of the day, I am not being judged for my looks as harshly as any celerity has to be. I appreciate BEG’s honesty and before plastic surgery they were just as beautiful and talented as they are now, in my opinion. Many idols are natural and even if they’re not, it doesn’t change the heart or mind of that person. The obsession with beauty in Korea is really thought provoking and I only wish that a country so conservative yet modern could find a similar balance in how they talk about, perceive, and promote plastic surgery.

  • Judith Mopalia

    I”m hoping that tis is the beginning or the end for the plastic surgery craze.  It will probably take a few decades, but I hope people will eventually realize that this is just ridiculous and learn to look inside for beauty and to expand their definitions of beauty.  As a Westerner, I don’t find the look that those girls have paid and suffered to achieve to be attractive at all – there’s no personality left in the faces.  Cookie cutter faces, no real person is left there.    

    • jesuis2

      C’mon now, it’s not like plastic surgery is a rarity in the West.

      Heck, Hollywood producers have stated that they had to look to foreign actors since so many wannabes in Hollywood had the same look.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/5E4I7WFJASMDO5EVL5P76KIIK4 Nataly

      As long as men continue to demand that women be beautiful, and continue to treat the rest of the women as unworthy of even being spoken to, this is not going to change. Unfortunately, it will only get worse, as men’s beauty demands will only be more and more impossible to achieve… It’s all their fault, and they are so entitled that they don’t even think there is anything wrong with that… 

      • jesuis2

        It’s usually more women then men.
        For example, women tend to dress up more to compete w/ other women.

  • http://twitter.com/EveryoneLovesJustKidding Just Kidding?11

    I’m gonna be completely honest. Plastic surgery is bad as it gives an unfair advantage for those people who opt for it. Yes, it gives them better opportunities but at the cost of raising the beauty standards for everyone else. So when the person who has the plastic done gets preferential treatment, it makes opportunities worse for everyone else who can’t get it even if they wanted to. 

    This unbalance I imagine might serve for creating a society in where if you can’t obtain this beauty standard you’d be shunned away. I fell like SK society has turned toward this sort of caste system.

  • littleboyd

    Korean plastic surgery has served as a sort of hater’s propaganda for more than a decade, and I am sick of it.
    It’s up to individual decision and that’s all.

    I’ve met many foreigners asking me if I or fellow Koreans did surgery, which made me feel so uncomfortable. In some cases, they just don’t give up the idea that I did surgery, even after I said no. Really annoying.

    • kelli321

       It is unfortunate when people stereotype. I suppose foreigner’s assumptions come from recent stats that South Korea now officially has the highest rates of plastic surgery per capita with 1 in 5 women having had something done. I’m not sure how long you have lived or still live in Korea, but simply by opening a Korean Ceci magazine vs a Chinese Ceci magazine, you can tell the difference. The Korean Ceci mag had almost a quarter of the pages dedicated to plastic surgery and plastic surgery advertisements. The Chinese magazine had 2 pages. Things like this give impressions a higher social acceptability  (though not always admitting to it) as well as the availability of plastic surgery in Korea and that’s what foreigners outside of Korea jump on.

      But you’re right, stats aside. Regardless of media, peer or social pressure. It should be up to the individual’s decision. People asking you that sort of thing are being rude.

  • jesuis2

    Uhm, since when it is different anywhere else?

    It’s not like people elsewhere get plastic surgery for features that aren’t desirable.

    Since when does a person in NYC or LA say they want a nose job so their nose look like Karl Malden?

  • goldengluvsk2

    first of all, I wouldnt dare to get plastic surgery… i dont even like injections so to think about a pain greater than that is a huge NO-NO in my book… I believe people are free to do what they want as long as they dont hurt others in the process but I also believe in been happy with what you have. My experience since I had been in touch with Kpop-land and K-culture is that almost no one seems to be comfortable with their looks especially people in their teens. I’ve even heard about -BAD- parents telling their kids theyre ugly and that they should get PS… i mean, my mom always told me I was the prettiest girl in the world and I honestly thought -until the second I read that “get ps” comment- that every parent in the world said at least to their kids “you’re beautiful”.  Beauty standards in SK -and probably every other country- their beauty standards are completely different from the actual facial features their ethnicity can offer so it makes it even more impossible to achieve, creating all sort of complex and disorders. Imo, media and parents should focus on telling kids in their nation theyre beautiful no matter what and if after that when theyre adults they still want to change their features, then it would be their decision.

    • bang2tang

      then is it count as white lie?

  • chachamaru013

    it remind me of a book called Uglies where they all get a surgery at a certain age to look similar (or Pretty as it was called)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513439726 Sharon Overlord

    I found it really funny and I praise what BEG did. Still…it’s a bit disturbing. Especially that part where they say why is plastic surgery bad if it gives them confidence? It’s bad because even with plastic surgery, there will always be some flaw,

    This brings the question, when is it enough? Where is the limit? You can not solely rely on plastic surgery and outer beauty to feel good about yourself. Because then it becomes an obsession and well….you become out of touch with reality. Perfection is unattainable,

    Plus changing yourself so please society is also dangerous. True confidence must come within yourself, or else you will never be beautiful. I’m sure all of you can think of one person who constantly comlain about their looks even though they look fine. Quite honestly, they are less fun to hang out with compared to someone who may not ;ool like what society deems as being attractive. Yet, their confidence makes them fun and more attractive in your eyes. A great example of this would be Eunhyuk. Did he need PL to get the public to like him? No, he did not. In Korean society he would be considered unattractive but his charms make me blind to his flaws

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513439726 Sharon Overlord

    I found it really funny and I praise what BEG did. Still…it’s a bit disturbing. Especially that part where they say why is plastic surgery bad if it gives them confidence? It’s bad because even with plastic surgery, there will always be some flaw,

    This brings the question, when is it enough? Where is the limit? You can not solely rely on plastic surgery and outer beauty to feel good about yourself. Because then it becomes an obsession and well….you become out of touch with reality. Perfection is unattainable,

    Plus changing yourself so please society is also dangerous. True confidence must come within yourself, or else you will never be beautiful. I’m sure all of you can think of one person who constantly comlain about their looks even though they look fine. Quite honestly, they are less fun to hang out with compared to someone who may not look like what society deems as being attractive. Yet, their confidence makes them fun and more attractive in your eyes. A great example of this would be Eunhyuk. Did he need PL to get the public to like him? No, he did not. In Korean society he would be considered unattractive but his charms make me blind to his flaws

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513439726 Sharon Overlord

    I found it really funny and I praise what BEG did. Still…it’s a bit disturbing. Especially that part where they say why is plastic surgery bad if it gives them confidence? It’s bad because even with plastic surgery, there will always be some flaw,

    This brings the question, when is it enough? Where is the limit? You can not solely rely on plastic surgery and outer beauty to feel good about yourself. Because then it becomes an obsession and well….you become out of touch with reality. Perfection is unattainable,

    Plus changing yourself so please society is also dangerous. True confidence must come within yourself, or else you will never be beautiful. I’m sure all of you can think of one person who constantly comlain about their looks even though they look fine. Quite honestly, they are less fun to hang out with compared to someone who may not look like what society deems as being attractive. Yet, their confidence makes them fun and more attractive in your eyes. A great example of this would be Eunhyuk. Did he need PL to get the public to like him? No, he did not. In Korean society he would be considered unattractive but his charms make me blind to his flaws

    • MamaWack

      Your comment is so damn accurate. The danger with P.S is that some people can get hooked classic example Michael Jackson or Seo In Young (I lost count how many times that woman changed her nose) and like you said society need to accept people for the way they are nobody can ever have the v-line, big eyes and pointed nose plus white skin Korea loves. perfection is unattainable and those who are deemed perfect look like dolls or are so scary it turns a person off.
      Most sensible comment on here 

    • Miravelle

      I disagree. I don’t think we can pull the slippery slope argument here.

      If I buy a 20k designer handbag or coat, does that mean that I will most definitely fall into the trap of buying dozens more later on? I think that free will and personality do play into plastic surgery and we can’t assume that plastic surgery is like a gateway drug for every person. Yes, there are celebrities and regular people like us who have addictive personalities or tendencies to go overboard. (Michael Jackson was told from a young age that he had an ugly nose, that his skin was too dark, etc. and developed Body Dysmorphic Disorder over time which is why he went through multiple surgeries.) However, not everyone who receives plastic surgery develops this disorder or falls into the cycle of fixing one thing after the other.

      There’s also a difference between changing your appearance for your self and catering to what society deems attractive. Entertainers have a special case when it comes to plastic surgery–it’s part of their job to look a certain way so they can attract an audience who will pay for whatever they’re selling (albums, tickets to live performances, cosmetics, clothing, etc). They’re not being forced to join these entertainment companies so it isn’t as though they’re been held down under a scalpel against their will. I think it’s great that BEG owned up to not only having surgery, but actually feeling more confident with their looks now.

      I think that it shows a strong sense of self for these women to proclaim that they did have surgery, that they like the results, and that it makes them feel good. It’s honest. To lie about it would promote a strong sense of insecurity–that these women feel as though their personality & talents are not good enough on their own so they must pull the “I’m a natural beauty” card in order to reaffirm their worth. I understand that some companies require idols to lie about their surgeries but bravo to the idols who are allowed to bring plastic surgery to the forefront of discussions such as these.

  • cancertwin2

    The problem with SK is that they get more PS per capita compared to other countries.
    People are always bringing up “Hollywood” but that is a small amount of people compared to the entire US population. The majority of Americans couldn’t afford PS even if they wanted to get something done and most of us feel that it’s something only celebs and rich people do. Keep in mind that only 20% of US population actually holds wealth (it’s probably less now).

    In SK there are so many regular people who aren’t famous going in to get work done because their culture demands that they look attractive even for job applications and college entrance. I can’t imagine someone asking me to attach photos of myself to any of these things where looks have nothing to do with my qualifications.

    Also, there is no universal standard of beauty. Certain countries just fixate on particular physical traits. SK’s standards have been imported from the west a long time ago. Even Caucasians in America don’t want to look “too white” anymore.

    Furthermore, there is no positive data showing that PS can help one’s overall self-esteem and disposition. From what I’ve seen, the person then becomes insecure once it is discovered that they are not natural beauties out of fear of being teased and taunted for having to alter their original appearance. It’s just a vicious cycle.

    They can fix your outside but operations can’t fix your inside. The confidence has to come from within. Just look at Solbi.

    • chachamaru013

      Actually, those standards are not imported from the West ( whiteness )

      • bang2tang

        forehead implant + nose implant, V line jaw, small face???

        • chachamaru013

          I don’t really understand your comment, could you please explain?

  • Niina

    the thing is they were SO MUCH BETTER looking with their older (natural?) faces

  • Lucie

    It’s good that they are honest about it, but honestly, they looked better before. Korean people have really a problem with their bodies…

  • soph

    BEG are awesome for being honest and I don’t have a problem with small surgeries, but some idols use it waaaay to much e.g Park Bom