• aoko

    i love key but that shirt is pretty bad lol..

  • ShineeWorld52911

    Free speech man

  • ShineeWorld52911

    Free speech man

  • ShineeWorld52911

    Free speech man

  • http://twitter.com/EveryoneLovesJustKidding Just Kidding?11

    I guess I’m part of the “calm the f*ck down” crew, probably because I’m familiar with non-English speaking people adopting cuss words into their language.

    Honestly when I see idols wearing this type of clothing I’m not offended, it just funny to be. I wonder if these idols really do understand what the offensiveness of their clothing means and want to rebel against the squeaky-clean idol images imposed on them.

    When I saw Block B wearing that attire, it was at the Daegu concert which is the first time I had seen them on public broadcast since the controversy. I thought it was so fitting, knowing how some netizens would go crazy whenever they hear their name as if it was offensive in itself. So I think it’s an appropriate response that I found it funny and ironic.

    All in all, those I feel that complain are not really seeing idols for being human. Whether or not they understand even half the “offensive” stuff they wear, why would you want to prevent them from showing any expression at all, like isn’t that a basic human right?

  • http://twitter.com/jms177 Justy

    I really don’t think this issue is as big as the author is making it out to be…..

    • mos lore

      seoulbeats for you. sometimes they write about allot of good topic. then we have these pointless, problem seeking trash of work.

    • straighttohelvetica

      It’s not an issue, but it is kind of entertaining.

  • shannie4888

    Maybe I love idols behaving badly, but I love the offensive language attire. As a seasoned potty-mouth myself, I think a curse word every now sums up the way we all feel about the world: just f*ck it. Unfortunately Kpop idols are in the limelight and they do have to be idols to young children, who could interpret as cool and start using the words. I understand why agencies get worried over this sort of thing.  

    I’m not offended by it though. As I stated, I love it it and wish I could actually hear my Kpop idols cursing up a storm when they’re mad as hell and don’t wanna take it anymore. But since I’ll never be a fly on their wall, I’ll just keep on reading the profanity, so perfectly worn on their sleeves instead of only in their heart.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dim.tso Dim Tso

    Skipping through random parts in the article, I realized that this is yet another case of censorship here. All these companies or agencies or whatever that make money by acting as “censorship guardians for the public eye”, gotta eat. 

    There’s absolutely nothing wrong with what SNSD did there. Same applies to anyone else who does something similar. It’s all about avoiding the crappy cracks of the law that make big companies lose money by a smaller party that has something to gain by going against such cases.

  • dustdevilliz

    In the U.S., cussing (visual and verbal) are limited or filtered by formal commercial guidelines and considerations. For instance, a US broadcast network would have pixelated the hat in the SNSD video before it showing it, the mainstream US taboids (People, US, etc) would have pixelated any of the cuss words before running candid photos, and labels would be sure to release non-explicit versions for radio play. At the same time, musicians still cuss in performances, there are still explicit versions for sale, and US celebrities do still wear things with NSFW language.

    So it’s interesting that it appears that commercial guidelines/standards of S. Korea aren’t restricting the use of English cusswords… yet?  Lord knows that the entertainment companies and netizen public opinion restrict the idols in lots of other ways that would seem weird to US celebrities (e.g. dating), so I guess if this is still one area where they can be transgressive, I’m ok with that.

    When groups do try and make inroads with the US tween market, they’ll figure out how to censor themselves pretty quickly. Although, PSY’s song “Bitch” is still going to show up (down the list) of recommended songs for anyone who purchases “Gangnam Style” on itunes, and it doesn’t seem to have hurt him, so maybe not.

  • kpopfan6

    That Zico pic was perfect for this article!

    Anyway, I’ve had no problem with the way Kpop idols use English swear words. The only one that bothered me was CL’s sweater, but I think the fact that the sweater is butt ugly (imo) irks me more than what is actually written on it.

    And from what I’ve noticed, the people who were most upset by Sunny’s hat were Korean/Asian people who know English. I’m guessing that because they come from presumably strict, conservative countries they think others would be offended. But that’s very unlikely since most Western or English-speaking fans come from more liberal cultures. 

    Tbqh, I actually find idols’ use of swearing to be a bit refreshing since it gives me a break from all the image conscious nonsense (I’m soooo tired of that now).

    But at the end of the day, occasional swear word usage is the least of Kpop’s worries. If this industry really hopes to be better received by Westerners then they need to fix all their ridiculous ENGRISH first.

  • http://twitter.com/krisus_itsKris Jinee Scarlet

    All i know is that I laughed my ass off at Onew’s shirt…

  • http://twitter.com/silverukiss Silver

     The bands are selling an image, so they have to be careful about dramatically changing that image. Personally, I dislike cussing so if my bias started to throw swear words in every other sentence, I would probably move on and find someone else to like. He’s free to act however he wants, but how he acts is going to effect whether I buy as much of his products or not.

  • Janee’

    When I see stuff like that I just wonder if the idols know exactly what the phrases mean. Even in variety shows and whatnot, sometimes idols dance to English songs filled with cussing or the *n word* & whatnot and I always have a moment of “Omg why didn’t they censor that”?  I think Korea & idols need to be more conscious of stuff like that. I’m not saying everybody has got to be squeaky clean but I really feel like they have no clue how severe some of these English words are.

    There’s nothing wrong with self expression when you are an adult and whatnot but u also have to look out for others. It may be in another language but someone is bound to notice its meaning. 

    I would never wear an outfit with profanity during the day time because of children around possibly looking to sound out new words. Also, I wouldn’t want an elderly person to have a heart attack reading something profane on me.  

  • straighttohelvetica

    The Japanese “Rising Sun” video is my favorite THSK video for two reasons: Junsu knocking into that man’s hotdog and Jaejoong wearing that “f**king my way” shirt. That was done on purpose for some reason (to make JJ seem more badass IDK?) but I have yet to figure out what it is. I haven’t figured out the whole hotdog storyline yet, either, so …

    And ugh, Mirotic. I have the CD for the 3rd Mirotic tour and I refuse to even listen to that song’s peformance because “under my sky” is such a mood killer.

  • Gabrielle Minor

    I personally don’t think the problem is the cursing it’s self, but the fact that it seems that the idols wearing the words, or saying them, have no f**king idea what they’re saying.

    If someone is wearing a “vulgar” t-shirt that says, “I’m The Mother f**king Best,” and they themselves are known for being cocky and bombastic, while people might get offended, it fits. It makes sense. You’d assume that they know what it says since it fits their projected image. It doesn’t seem out of character for them to think or say that since that’s how they act. Now if that same singer has a word that just said a random foul sentence (…”discunt?”), you’re going to assume they’re just ignorant, the same way I assume people of chinese background feel when someone has a random word tattooed on their arm for no reason other than the look, or how the native americans felt when people started wearing “Navajo” printed paraphernalia. It’s not as offensive, not by a long shot, but it has the same feeling.

    It makes it look like they don’t care. That they’re like, “yeah, we know we have an english speaking market, but as long as we put english anywhere, they’ll eat it up. It doesn’t have to make sense or be polite, because they’ll buy it anyway.” Words have meaning, and if they want to be a global force, they have to take that into consideration.

    I personally feel the same way when they throw in english in a song and it makes no sense what so ever. Don’t throw it in there just to have, or just to make it seem like you’re reaching out to your english speaking market. If you want to use it, get someone to translate it and make it coherent. While everyone has a fan base, abusing their “love” for the idols is kind of, well, rude. That they think we’ll take and “electric, electric, elastic,” just because our favorite singer is singing it, makes it seem like they don’t take their global fan base seriously and that we don’t deserve the same attention that their native audience does.

    Does that mean that idols can’t/shouldn’t curse or wear racy printed sweaters? Of course not. If done right, cursing can bring emphasis to a song/feeling. That’s what it’s for. To show an extreme. Extreme anger, rage, desire. Not the most eloquent way, but it gets the job done quickly and efficiently, capturing your attention and making you listen at the same time. BUT ONLY IF DONE CORRECTLY.

    if someone brings cursing it to the attention of the idol(s), or their studios’, there shouldn’t be a race to clean it up because they just threw it out there. Someone should of said, “Hey, maybe “Welcome Motherf*ckers’ isn’t the best thing to put on the girl’s hats. You know, since we’re trying to make them appear as a ” forever 15 and innocent” kind of group. Just a thought.” It shows a lack of caring and it looks sloppy image wise.

    The reason it was taken so differently because it was blatantly unintentional. It clearly had nothing to do with the girls’ images, or even the song. So it brings a call for them to be more careful.

    TLDR: Idols need to watch what the f*ck they put on their shirts and hats, and watch what comes out of their mouths. If they want a global market, they need to act like it and be careful with the language they use and cover themselves with.

    P.S. Yay for cursing~

    • Tanya Joshi

      I totally agree!

      Firstly, I never swear because if things like the word “f***” come out of my mouth, my mouth feels all weird (yeah, I know… I’m strange). Hence I only say it at times like when I’m extremely stressed during an exam because professors think that we’re all geniuses who know how to solve things they’ve never seen before… And in addition, I’ll just whisper it under my breath…

      I also think it’s really stupid when they throw in random English phrases that make absolutely no sense… Are they trying to seem smarter, or…? It really honestly just makes them seem… less so… They know that a lot of English-speaking people listen to their songs, so they need to realize that we are DEFINITELY gonna notice when you put a nonsense English phrase in… And as much as you like a group, saying things like “Fantastic, Elastic” are laughable because it clearly means nothing, and even if it does, what a weird way to describe a girl… Like, as much as I love the phrase and EXO, what the hell does “Roll like a buffalo” even mean!? I mean, they even have a Canadian singing it, how could they not at least CHECK if it made sense…? My all time favourites, though, are, “Please my hate girl” and “Make a love, baby”, both by BEAST… Like… what do those things mean…? In the second one, for the longest time I was wondering why they were saying “Make love, baby”, but at least that would’ve made more sense…

      At least I can laugh about those… But when it comes to swearing, they really need to make sure they’re saying something at least slightly suitable… As much as I personally don’t really like cursing in a casual way, I can still SOMEWHAT (SOOOMEWHAT) get over them saying “motherf*ckers”… But I think saying “di$cunt” is just extremely ignorant, even though I love Key… And that “money coming out of my ass” shirt didn’t offend me at all, but the picture just overall was gross… Even in the West I don’t understand the whole casual cursing… I mean, is there really a need to say f*** in every sentence? Not really, it isn’t really making the point more intense… I don’t mind when they say it to show extreme emotion, like you said, because it does very much show how strong you feel about things…

      Besides, most idols are probably just doing it to be like the West… “Oh, people in the West do it AAALL the time, so let’s do it, too!!! Yaaay!” Well, they mostly really only care what Americans do (I’m just stating a fact… No one really bothers what Canada does -.-)… (CANADA! YAY!)(<- sorry, haha…) And even if they aren't, I don't really think cursing means you're more mature or whatever… Also, I thought that stylists sometimes even style idols' outfits for just going to an airport, so why would they feel the need to do that?

      All in all, I can somewhat get over it if they know what those words mean. But when they throw those words around just to seem cool or rebellious, without even knowing what they mean, then it's just stupid.

      Sorry about the rant, most people probably are like, "Who gives a damn what they do!"

  • Gabrielle Minor

    I personally don’t think the problem is the cursing it’s self, but the fact that it seems that the idols wearing the words, or saying them, have no f**king idea what they’re saying.

    If someone is wearing a “vulgar” t-shirt that says, “I’m The Mother f**king Best,” and they themselves are known for being cocky and bombastic, while people might get offended, it fits. It makes sense. You’d assume that they know what it says since it fits their projected image. It doesn’t seem out of character for them to think or say that since that’s how they act. Now if that same singer has a word that just said a random foul sentence (…”discunt?”), you’re going to assume they’re just ignorant, the same way I assume people of chinese background feel when someone has a random word tattooed on their arm for no reason other than the look, or how the native americans felt when people started wearing “Navajo” printed paraphernalia. It’s not as offensive, not by a long shot, but it has the same feeling.

    It makes it look like they don’t care. That they’re like, “yeah, we know we have an english speaking market, but as long as we put english anywhere, they’ll eat it up. It doesn’t have to make sense or be polite, because they’ll buy it anyway.” Words have meaning, and if they want to be a global force, they have to take that into consideration.

    I personally feel the same way when they throw in english in a song and it makes no sense what so ever. Don’t throw it in there just to have, or just to make it seem like you’re reaching out to your english speaking market. If you want to use it, get someone to translate it and make it coherent. While everyone has a fan base, abusing their “love” for the idols is kind of, well, rude. That they think we’ll take and “electric, electric, elastic,” just because our favorite singer is singing it, makes it seem like they don’t take their global fan base seriously and that we don’t deserve the same attention that their native audience does.

    Does that mean that idols can’t/shouldn’t curse or wear racy printed sweaters? Of course not. If done right, cursing can bring emphasis to a song/feeling. That’s what it’s for. To show an extreme. Extreme anger, rage, desire. Not the most eloquent way, but it gets the job done quickly and efficiently, capturing your attention and making you listen at the same time. BUT ONLY IF DONE CORRECTLY.

    if someone brings cursing it to the attention of the idol(s), or their studios’, there shouldn’t be a race to clean it up because they just threw it out there. Someone should of said, “Hey, maybe “Welcome Motherf*ckers’ isn’t the best thing to put on the girl’s hats. You know, since we’re trying to make them appear as a ” forever 15 and innocent” kind of group. Just a thought.” It shows a lack of caring and it looks sloppy image wise.

    The reason it was taken so differently because it was blatantly unintentional. It clearly had nothing to do with the girls’ images, or even the song. So it brings a call for them to be more careful.

    TLDR: Idols need to watch what the f*ck they put on their shirts and hats, and watch what comes out of their mouths. If they want a global market, they need to act like it and be careful with the language they use and cover themselves with.

    P.S. Yay for cursing~

  • k_db

    Personally, I would definitely wear a Comme Des Fuckdown shirt. It’s really more of a fashion statement than… an actual statement. If that makes any sense.

  • k_db

    Personally, I would definitely wear a Comme Des Fuckdown shirt. It’s really more of a fashion statement than… an actual statement. If that makes any sense.

  • iWantpancakes

    This immediately reminded me of one episode of WGM with Gain and Jokwon. They were with a foreigner who pretended not to know Korean and they had to communicate with him in English. Gain was looking in her translation book (I have no idea what kind of translation book she had) and said in English,”I wanna take a dump on your chest.” Like for real. I wonder what that guy was thinking when she said that him. LOL

  • http://twitter.com/amionne92 Ami-ah

    Irrelevant to the article but I find it funny that Block B has like a whole wardrobe full of Commes des F*ckdown attire. Jaehyo has a sweatshirt/hoodie and Taeil also has a beanie like Zico (unless it’s the same beanie)

  • Judith Mopalia

    One of the pleasures for me in K-pop is that I don’t have to listen to the kind of language that permeates U.S. hip hop and rap. I avoid almost all female idol groups because I detest the aegyo or sex sells stereotyping that is such a big part of girl groups. And what you wear – especially a t-shirt, which is casual, personal dress- says something about who you are. If Key understands the cultural implications of that t-shirt, I’m done with him and, by extension, probably the whole group. If he doesn’t, he shouldn’t be wearing it – if the management company chose it, they’re idiots, and if he chose it , he’s also an idiot. Women are abused in too many cultures across the world for us to have tolerance for anything like this, and if you’re female and disagree, look at the opportunities and sterotyping that your own culture has – are you equal with the men you know? Thank you for this article – there needs to be more noise about offensive gender stereotyping.

    • Tanya Joshi

      OH. MY. GOD… I’VE NEVER THOUGHT SOMEONE WOULD THINK THAT MUCH LIKE ME!

      That’s exactly why I came to KPop… It doesn’t really have too much to do with the quality, but more of the fact that I can listen to their songs knowing that there isn’t some explicit version of it, or extreme language and (I totally forgot the word I was gonna use…) OH! Downgrading of girls… Well, KPop songs do do it, but at least the ones I listen to don’t and don’t have girls bumping and grinding, and passing off a tight t-shirt and short shorts as clothing… Just wear your underwear and bra if you’re gonna wear that… it costs less… I mostly hate all girl groups, other than maybe 2NE1, because I hate watching those girls act all cute and innocent yet at the same time dance the way the do… When girls start to do extremely sexual body waves, bend down and stick their butt out and show a lot of crotch-y dances, it just pisses me off… And then they go label the girl off as “nation’s little innocent sister”. IU is probably sweet, and I love Hyukie to death so I don’t care what he does in his love life, but it’s the company’s own fault if IU starts getting bombarded with insults over a photo. Don’t stick this “sqeaky clean” image on her, it’s not going to work! She’s a pretty, popular girl, who’s famous and has a good voice = she’s gonna have a lot of men running after her and who knows what…

      80% of American pop songs just talk about meeting some girl in a night club, her body being so sexy, and then having sex with her… Like, REALLY?! REALLY!? God… I used to like Nicki Minaj’s “Starships” but when I heard the original version and then her calling HERSELF the N word with such pride, I was done with that song… I’m glad that the older idols (SuJu and such) and the ones that debuted before 2010 can sing songs with SOME SMALL hint of meaning without the use of useless English phrases. The idols now days are getting dumber (in terms of songs)… They sing too many nonsense English phrases… But Key went overboard, and that “money out my ass shirt” just visually grossed me out…

    • Tanya Joshi

      OH. MY. GOD… I’VE NEVER THOUGHT SOMEONE WOULD THINK THAT MUCH LIKE ME!

      That’s exactly why I came to KPop… It doesn’t really have too much to do with the quality, but more of the fact that I can listen to their songs knowing that there isn’t some explicit version of it, or extreme language and (I totally forgot the word I was gonna use…) OH! Downgrading of girls… Well, KPop songs do do it, but at least the ones I listen to don’t and don’t have girls bumping and grinding, and passing off a tight t-shirt and short shorts as clothing… Just wear your underwear and bra if you’re gonna wear that… it costs less… I mostly hate all girl groups, other than maybe 2NE1, because I hate watching those girls act all cute and innocent yet at the same time dance the way the do… When girls start to do extremely sexual body waves, bend down and stick their butt out and show a lot of crotch-y dances, it just pisses me off… And then they go label the girl off as “nation’s little innocent sister”. IU is probably sweet, and I love Hyukie to death so I don’t care what he does in his love life, but it’s the company’s own fault if IU starts getting bombarded with insults over a photo. Don’t stick this “sqeaky clean” image on her, it’s not going to work! She’s a pretty, popular girl, who’s famous and has a good voice = she’s gonna have a lot of men running after her and who knows what…

      80% of American pop songs just talk about meeting some girl in a night club, her body being so sexy, and then having sex with her… Like, REALLY?! REALLY!? God… I used to like Nicki Minaj’s “Starships” but when I heard the original version and then her calling HERSELF the N word with such pride, I was done with that song… I’m glad that the older idols (SuJu and such) and the ones that debuted before 2010 can sing songs with SOME SMALL hint of meaning without the use of useless English phrases. The idols now days are getting dumber (in terms of songs)… They sing too many nonsense English phrases… But Key went overboard, and that “money out my ass shirt” just visually grossed me out…

  • Diana Merino

    I just find it funny, especially to think that some of the idols that wear apparel with explicit language don’t actually know what it is. And thanks to Zico’s use of “COMME des FUCKDOWN”, I now own a shirt too.

  • http://twitter.com/anakeyxhen Key Xhen

    in Heart quake by super junior, sorry sorry album shit was used in the opening lyrics…..surprised seoulbeats didn’t mention that.
    ELF LOVE