• http://profile.yahoo.com/4PK6R7VCEI3Z2TAEG47GWSE52Y Ellie

    Lord if you ever tried to label me (as a west african) being in ‘the black community’ I would hate it. West African, North African, South African, East African and Afro-Caribbean people all have very separate and distinct cultures with very different views on how the world should be. The idea that there is a ‘black culture’ as you name it is a very closed minded view and one which I can not endorse. I don’t know where you are from but even the Afro-Caribbean people I know in London would consider themselves completely different to an Afro-Caribbean in the US or in the Caribbean itself. If you mean Black-American then say it, but don’t lump around a billion people in with your own community, they wont thank you for it.

    I know you qualify your article by saying that you’re not a spokesperson for black people but throughout it you keep referring to the black community as one cohesive thing, which it is not. I love seoulbeats but I’m extremely disappointed.

    • Bambi

      I don’t think she meant it in a bad way when she was generalizing; the article probably applies to Black Americans. I think the article would be more plausible if your niche was Black Americans just because of the “culture” K-pop is inspired from. You are mentioning Michael Jackson, Beyonce, etc, which are all American musicians. And although they have impacted music worldwide, they are not a representation of “black” music worldwide. 
      I’m an African living in the US and I definitely agree with you in the sense that not all black people are the same. However I think being disappointed is a lot. I honestly can’t tell you how many times me and my African friends distinguished ourselves from Black Americans and vice-versa. This applies to most other ethnicities too. The author might not have known of the differences within the ethnicity, and I can’t blame her for that. 
      On another note, as a American music listener, I do see the appeal to Black Americans especially since that is where they get their inspiration. Some songs definitely sound like hip-hop, just slightly pop(ier) or electronic(ier), and in Korean. I really enjoy it musically speaking, but when I see their outfits and how “hard” they try to look, i honestly sigh (but that’s a whole other topic). 

    • Bambi

      I don’t think she meant it in a bad way when she was generalizing; the article probably applies to Black Americans. I think the article would be more plausible if your niche was Black Americans just because of the “culture” K-pop is inspired from. You are mentioning Michael Jackson, Beyonce, etc, which are all American musicians. And although they have impacted music worldwide, they are not a representation of “black” music worldwide. 
      I’m an African living in the US and I definitely agree with you in the sense that not all black people are the same. However I think being disappointed is a lot. I honestly can’t tell you how many times me and my African friends distinguished ourselves from Black Americans and vice-versa. This applies to most other ethnicities too. The author might not have known of the differences within the ethnicity, and I can’t blame her for that. 
      On another note, as a American music listener, I do see the appeal to Black Americans especially since that is where they get their inspiration. Some songs definitely sound like hip-hop, just slightly pop(ier) or electronic(ier), and in Korean. I really enjoy it musically speaking, but when I see their outfits and how “hard” they try to look, i honestly sigh (but that’s a whole other topic). 

    • Bambi

      I don’t think she meant it in a bad way when she was generalizing; the article probably applies to Black Americans. I think the article would be more plausible if your niche was Black Americans just because of the “culture” K-pop is inspired from. You are mentioning Michael Jackson, Beyonce, etc, which are all American musicians. And although they have impacted music worldwide, they are not a representation of “black” music worldwide. 
      I’m an African living in the US and I definitely agree with you in the sense that not all black people are the same. However I think being disappointed is a lot. I honestly can’t tell you how many times me and my African friends distinguished ourselves from Black Americans and vice-versa. This applies to most other ethnicities too. The author might not have known of the differences within the ethnicity, and I can’t blame her for that. 
      On another note, as a American music listener, I do see the appeal to Black Americans especially since that is where they get their inspiration. Some songs definitely sound like hip-hop, just slightly pop(ier) or electronic(ier), and in Korean. I really enjoy it musically speaking, but when I see their outfits and how “hard” they try to look, i honestly sigh (but that’s a whole other topic). 

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/MMRQEZEPSNJ26LJ7XJNDDM5NCI JasmineA

      I think there is a cultural misunderstanding. The black community, refers to black American even if we don’t say that usually that’s whats implied. Of course the author probably should have taken into account that not only Americans read Seoulbeats but as an American I got what the author meant, she wasn’t generalizing. Most black Americans do not know what ethnicity they are, so we often times use terms like black culture, black community to refer to African American culture. 

      • Nicole Hawkins

        Good point. Most of these idols are appropriating and listing Black American Music/Black American culture as influences and inspiration. I understood what the author was writing as well. It’s a shame that this has turned into “Don’t lump me in with THOSE people.” debate.

      • Nicole Hawkins

        Good point. Most of these idols are appropriating and listing Black American Music/Black American culture as influences and inspiration. I understood what the author was writing as well. It’s a shame that this has turned into “Don’t lump me in with THOSE people.” debate.

      • Nicole Hawkins

        Good point. Most of these idols are appropriating and listing Black American Music/Black American culture as influences and inspiration. I understood what the author was writing as well. It’s a shame that this has turned into “Don’t lump me in with THOSE people.” debate.

    • straighttohelvetica

      Your comment left a horribly bad taste in my mouth. Maybe it’s because I’ve had to deal with Africans who have immigrated to the U.S. who fall for the same stereotypes that other races do and for some reason think they’re better than the “ghetto” black Americans.

      “Lord if you ever tried to label me (as a west african) being in ‘the black community’ I would hate it.” Why? There is a black community. No, not every community within that community is the same, but black Americans, Africans, people in the Afro-Caribbeans and Afro-Latinos are part of Africa and the African diaspora, and as a result, do have some similarities and share in some similar experiences (especially in regards to health, education, culture, colonialism, slavery, oppression, etc.) Or at the very least, share more similarities than they do differences.

      I get what you’re saying, that the author could have been more accurate in stating she meant kpop was influenced by black American pop culture. (In her defense, she does link her first reference to black culture to the wiki article titled “African American culture.”) But the whole “don’t you dare lump me with THOSE people” vibe of your comment was, in my opinion, very insulting.

    • straighttohelvetica

      Your comment left a horribly bad taste in my mouth. Maybe it’s because I’ve had to deal with Africans who have immigrated to the U.S. who fall for the same stereotypes that other races do and for some reason think they’re better than the “ghetto” black Americans.

      “Lord if you ever tried to label me (as a west african) being in ‘the black community’ I would hate it.” Why? There is a black community. No, not every community within that community is the same, but black Americans, Africans, people in the Afro-Caribbeans and Afro-Latinos are part of Africa and the African diaspora, and as a result, do have some similarities and share in some similar experiences (especially in regards to health, education, culture, colonialism, slavery, oppression, etc.) Or at the very least, share more similarities than they do differences.

      I get what you’re saying, that the author could have been more accurate in stating she meant kpop was influenced by black American pop culture. (In her defense, she does link her first reference to black culture to the wiki article titled “African American culture.”) But the whole “don’t you dare lump me with THOSE people” vibe of your comment was, in my opinion, very insulting.

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/4PK6R7VCEI3Z2TAEG47GWSE52Y Ellie

        Because growing up in the UK, as a West African has been hard. Not because of racism from white people because I’m black, but because of the fact that people expect me to act in the same ways as the much larger Afro-Caribbean community. I had to grow up not really understanding what I was because British culture pushed me together with a group of people that weren’t the same as me. I have absolutely no problem with black people of a different race, in fact one of my best friends is of Jamaican descent. But all I was saying is that similarly to how a Japanese person would be hugely offended to be mistaken for a Korean or a Chinese person, since it is culturally insensitive, I find it rude to be put in with a view that she is displaying from a particular cultural standpoint.

        ‘Why? There is a black community. No, not every community within that community is the same, but black Americans, Africans, people in the Afro-Caribbeans and Afro-Latinos are part of Africa and the African diaspora, and as a result, do have some similarities and share in some similar experiences (especially in regards to health, education, culture, colonialism, slavery, oppression, etc.)’

        You have no clue do you? That comment is so utterly ridiculous and demeaning that I probably shouldn’t bother even answering. I’ll give you an overview of how they are different (though I’m generalising a bit and each country is very distinct in its own way). West africa has a lot of the smaller rich countries like Ghana and the Ivory Coast. Whilst slavery has had an impact there, you would be surprised at how little it has impacted society as a whole. You have to remember that since very few people who were sent away as slaves have returned, all the people left in africa saw was the good side (i.e the payment they received). At that time since slavery was accept as a norm in society they didn’t think much of it, and now they consider themselves quite different and don’t really consider slavery as part of who they are at all. 

        Colonialism is another thing you mentioned. Again you can’t lump colonialism into one bracket, certain countries like Kenya had no problem in taking over a new hierarchical system and in many ways benefited from colonialism. But the British were far more heavy handed in other countries. Another thing to bear in mind is that Portugal, France and Britain all approached colonisation in their own distinct way. The French in particular tried to cause as little damage as possible in the interests of trade.

        I could go through all the others but I guess the best comparison would be pointing out the huge difference between British and American, Spanish, Mexican and Argentine culture. 300 years is long enough to make us all very separate and distinct. I am in no way trying to say that I am better than any African-American, just point out that we are different.

        • straighttohelvetica

          “You have no clue do you? That comment is so utterly ridiculous and demeaning that I probably shouldn’t bother even answering.”

          Wow, maybe you just don’t know how to type without being insulting. I came to you respectful and had hoped you would do the same. I do have a clue, thank you. You misread my comment, much like you misread the author’s post. 

          I agreed with you that it was wrong to lump different communities together under one label and that using the term black American or African American would have been more accurate. 

          What I had a problem with was your stating that you and apparently many others would hate getting labeled as part of a larger global black community and your apparent “exceptionalism.” There are whole academic programs, books, institutes, initiatives, etc., devoted to Africa and the African diaspora. It’s a thing. No, not all the cultures in it are the same. (I’ve said this three times now.) But, culture scientists can look at black Americans/black Latinos/etc. and see how aspects of their culture were influenced by cultures in Africa. There are health issues that affect black people no matter where they live (Sickle-cell anemia, low white blood cell count, etc.). I don’t know why this idea is so offensive to you or why it would be considered close-minded; it’s common sense. 

          Your examples further prove my point. The UK and the US are culturally different, but the US cannot deny the influence the UK has had in the States (the entire US legal system was created and modeled after the English legal system). Argentina, Mexico, Cuba are all culturally different, but the individual countries still consider themselves as part of the Spanish-speaking world. In its international relations, Spain has actively sought to strengthen its ties with these countries because of shared cultural values.

          Maybe I’m sensitive to it because I’m tired of dealing with Africans who think they’re super special BECAUSE they’re African and believe that black Americans are lazy, violent, loud, whatever other crap they’ve learned from stereotypes. I’ve dealt with people who have explicitly said they resent black Americans and the culture and people who go out of their way to emphasize they’re African because they don’t want to be lumped with people they themselves look down on. I’ve dealt with too many people who have the nerve to pretty much disown black Americans as part of Africa and its history, BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim Africa as you think I am. But that’s just as ignorant as the exceptionalism I read in your comment, so I’ll try and work on that.

        • straighttohelvetica

          “You have no clue do you? That comment is so utterly ridiculous and demeaning that I probably shouldn’t bother even answering.”

          Wow, maybe you just don’t know how to type without being insulting. I came to you respectful and had hoped you would do the same. I do have a clue, thank you. You misread my comment, much like you misread the author’s post. 

          I agreed with you that it was wrong to lump different communities together under one label and that using the term black American or African American would have been more accurate. 

          What I had a problem with was your stating that you and apparently many others would hate getting labeled as part of a larger global black community and your apparent “exceptionalism.” There are whole academic programs, books, institutes, initiatives, etc., devoted to Africa and the African diaspora. It’s a thing. No, not all the cultures in it are the same. (I’ve said this three times now.) But, culture scientists can look at black Americans/black Latinos/etc. and see how aspects of their culture were influenced by cultures in Africa. There are health issues that affect black people no matter where they live (Sickle-cell anemia, low white blood cell count, etc.). I don’t know why this idea is so offensive to you or why it would be considered close-minded; it’s common sense. 

          Your examples further prove my point. The UK and the US are culturally different, but the US cannot deny the influence the UK has had in the States (the entire US legal system was created and modeled after the English legal system). Argentina, Mexico, Cuba are all culturally different, but the individual countries still consider themselves as part of the Spanish-speaking world. In its international relations, Spain has actively sought to strengthen its ties with these countries because of shared cultural values.

          Maybe I’m sensitive to it because I’m tired of dealing with Africans who think they’re super special BECAUSE they’re African and believe that black Americans are lazy, violent, loud, whatever other crap they’ve learned from stereotypes. I’ve dealt with people who have explicitly said they resent black Americans and the culture and people who go out of their way to emphasize they’re African because they don’t want to be lumped with people they themselves look down on. I’ve dealt with too many people who have the nerve to pretty much disown black Americans as part of Africa and its history, BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim Africa as you think I am. But that’s just as ignorant as the exceptionalism I read in your comment, so I’ll try and work on that.

        • straighttohelvetica

          “You have no clue do you? That comment is so utterly ridiculous and demeaning that I probably shouldn’t bother even answering.”

          Wow, maybe you just don’t know how to type without being insulting. I came to you respectful and had hoped you would do the same. I do have a clue, thank you. You misread my comment, much like you misread the author’s post. 

          I agreed with you that it was wrong to lump different communities together under one label and that using the term black American or African American would have been more accurate. 

          What I had a problem with was your stating that you and apparently many others would hate getting labeled as part of a larger global black community and your apparent “exceptionalism.” There are whole academic programs, books, institutes, initiatives, etc., devoted to Africa and the African diaspora. It’s a thing. No, not all the cultures in it are the same. (I’ve said this three times now.) But, culture scientists can look at black Americans/black Latinos/etc. and see how aspects of their culture were influenced by cultures in Africa. There are health issues that affect black people no matter where they live (Sickle-cell anemia, low white blood cell count, etc.). I don’t know why this idea is so offensive to you or why it would be considered close-minded; it’s common sense. 

          Your examples further prove my point. The UK and the US are culturally different, but the US cannot deny the influence the UK has had in the States (the entire US legal system was created and modeled after the English legal system). Argentina, Mexico, Cuba are all culturally different, but the individual countries still consider themselves as part of the Spanish-speaking world. In its international relations, Spain has actively sought to strengthen its ties with these countries because of shared cultural values.

          Maybe I’m sensitive to it because I’m tired of dealing with Africans who think they’re super special BECAUSE they’re African and believe that black Americans are lazy, violent, loud, whatever other crap they’ve learned from stereotypes. I’ve dealt with people who have explicitly said they resent black Americans and the culture and people who go out of their way to emphasize they’re African because they don’t want to be lumped with people they themselves look down on. I’ve dealt with too many people who have the nerve to pretty much disown black Americans as part of Africa and its history, BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim Africa as you think I am. But that’s just as ignorant as the exceptionalism I read in your comment, so I’ll try and work on that.

          • GreyLeaves

             You sound like a self-hater to be honest. Your anger towards Africans is not a good look.

            “BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US
            and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like
            equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African
            American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim
            Africa as you think I am.”

            — Self-hatred at its finest. Your vitriol and hate towards Africans makes you look dumb right now. Honestly, this comment sounds like something that should be coming out of an old racist. Yeah, you talk about resenting the fact that Africans look down on black american, but with this comment you are projecting negative thoughts and words on people with the same melanin as you, but different culture than you. I think you need to get educated, sis.

             The op was not even saying negative things towards african americans, you decided to project your insecurities onto her comment.

          • GreyLeaves

             You sound like a self-hater to be honest. Your anger towards Africans is not a good look.

            “BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US
            and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like
            equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African
            American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim
            Africa as you think I am.”

            — Self-hatred at its finest. Your vitriol and hate towards Africans makes you look dumb right now. Honestly, this comment sounds like something that should be coming out of an old racist. Yeah, you talk about resenting the fact that Africans look down on black american, but with this comment you are projecting negative thoughts and words on people with the same melanin as you, but different culture than you. I think you need to get educated, sis.

             The op was not even saying negative things towards african americans, you decided to project your insecurities onto her comment.

          • GreyLeaves

             You sound like a self-hater to be honest. Your anger towards Africans is not a good look.

            “BUT because of the work of black Americans, are able to come to the US
            and study in our universities and live in the cities and be treated like
            equals. Hell, there’s a reason I prefer black American to African
            American, and this is part of it. Trust me, I’m not as eager to claim
            Africa as you think I am.”

            — Self-hatred at its finest. Your vitriol and hate towards Africans makes you look dumb right now. Honestly, this comment sounds like something that should be coming out of an old racist. Yeah, you talk about resenting the fact that Africans look down on black american, but with this comment you are projecting negative thoughts and words on people with the same melanin as you, but different culture than you. I think you need to get educated, sis.

             The op was not even saying negative things towards african americans, you decided to project your insecurities onto her comment.

          • straighttohelvetica

            Nope, not self hating and I don’t hate Africans. I just don’t like the OP’s attitude. I glad you haven’t had to deal with similar attitudes in real life; I have and I felt the need to call her out on it. If my reply sounds harsh it’s because when I tried to have a respectful discussion with the her, she all but called me stupid and completely missed my point. So, yeah, I let her have it.

            Please tell me how “Lord if you ever tried to label me (as a west african) being in ‘the black community’ I would hate it” not negative? OP’s first post was rude and resentful. “don’t lump around a billion people in with your own community, they wont thank you for it.” Nobody did that. The author linked to the wiki article clearly titled “African-American Culture.” Her biggest mistake was forgetting this site has an international audience and assuming that people would know she meant black American when she said black (which I recognize as a valid criticism). She didn’t mention West Africa or any part of Africa at all and she certainly didn’t imply that cultures from North Africa or Central Africa or the Caribbean were all the same. So, the OP’s accusation of cultural insensitivity and her “extreme disappointment” was unnecessary.

            This article was about the influences of black (American) culture on k-pop. OP decided to respond with an unnecessary rant on how she was not a part of that culture, wouldn’t want to be a part of that culture and neither would billions of other people. She then went on to deny that a black global community exists and called me closed-minded and offensive for implying that it did. (Stupidest argument I’ve ever taken part in here, tbh. It was like trying to convince someone that trees and grass are both still plants even though they look different.) She repeatedly kept limiting a discussion about black people worldwide to just Africa/African culture. (We get it: They’re 2000% more unique than the rest of us!! =D!)

            So, as long as you’re going around calling people out for their racism and hate, ask OP why she so despises the idea that her West Africa and my and the author’s black America may be parts of the same community.

        • Brave400

           “That comment is so utterly ridiculous and demeaning that I probably shouldn’t bother even answering”

          I wish we could dislike posts here. How old are you? You’re attitude is so snooty and self centered you have no idea how offensive what you said comes off to others. How would you feel if someone said “Oh God, if someone lumped me with those oppressed Africans, I would be offended. I’m an American, not an immigrant running away from war and famine”?

          As for the post, maybe since the writer stated that the black people in question originated hip hop, RnB, jazz etc. S/he thought their oh so intelligent so there for not black American  readers would be smart enough to infer what demographic they were speaking about since their own had jack sh*t to do with any of that.

    • Casey

      I agree with the others who said it is a cultural misunderstanding…in american english (if that’s the politically correct way to phrase it?) The term ‘black community’ means black americans. We never use it to refer to (of course the ‘we’ I am using refers to only my own life experiences) to other countries’ african descendants…Like jasmineA said, many of us, as much as some would like to, don’t know what they are, so black community is the term we use to identify black americans with…And there is the existence of mini communities underneath the larger black community like what straighttohelvetoca was stating in the beginning of her comment. All have differences, but still have similar experiences, and are honestly treated as a lumped group by outside minority groups anyway…

    • http://twitter.com/J2201987 Justin Asomugha

      The majority of your post was NOT necessary. Firstly, anyone in this day and age with a highly-functioning brain knows that there are different cultures and ethnicities without even stating it. Secondly, if you took the time to hover over the link where it says “black culture” you’d know the author was referring to “African-American culture”. Whether it was directly expressed or not, it is a term that could be verified on your own through a simple Google search to know exactly what it means. 

      It’s funny to me because as time goes by I’m beginning to recognize more hatred and disdain not from Caucasian people (excuse me, Anglos, Deutsch, Welsh, Frisians,  Italians, etc because, you know, don’t wanna lump all those white people together), but from Africans, Afro-Europeans and Afro-Caribbeans towards North-Black Americans as if we’re some sort of parasite that has plagued all of humanity. Despite the image the corporate-controlled American media continues to blast towards the rest of the world, which is why we continue to have this conversation ad nauseam, not all of us are ignorant, loud, violent, EBT card-carrying, Indian weave-wearing, pants sagging bottom feeders with a basketball team of illegitimate children. Many of us are a diligent, responsible, and dependable people, like other Americans. Many of our ancestors have achieved a great number of things which helped propel the U.S. to the world stage as leading super-power. 

      It’s also funny how you specifically don’t want to be labeled as a “West African” seeing as that, if you’re from the U.K. like you claim, you are likely a descendant from West Africa, like 90% of New-world blacks. Oh, THE shame and embarrassment of it all. SMDH….

  • ShineeWorld52911

    As an black kpop listener I agree with you because every point is dead on right.

  • Mson

    You have to remember that, as a recent article on this site discussed, 99% of Kpop revenue comes from Asia, of which 80% is from Japan (so even Korea is a minority source of revenue). The fact that such a large Western fan base has grown online is therefore entirely unintentional on the part of the industry, which makes it all the more amazing. But unfortunately that also means there’s little incentive to stop racist things like use of blackface.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/MMRQEZEPSNJ26LJ7XJNDDM5NCI JasmineA

    In a sort of ironic way, those points you mention could either drive people towards kpop or away from it depending on how you take it, and how much further you get into Korean culture outside of kpop. For me at first I thought it was sort of flattering but now I find it more stereotypical than anything which makes it harder for me to really enjoy kpop sometimes. A lot of things in kpop concerning black culture is sort of contradictory. I mean they barely even use black people in kpop videos when they are trying to appeal to Americans, so it makes me wonder if they think America is white anyways, and how do I factor into that, do black people even cross their mind when they are trying to broaden their market if they think Westerners are all white. Black culture is whats “in”, it makes money. It doesn’t necessarily mean that they are all that inspired by it as they claim, I’m starting to learn that. But then you do have the ones like YoungGuk, Taeyang, Hoya who actually seem sincere about it, but often times don’t really know much about black culture outside of singing, dancing etc so what ends up happening is stereotyping, (if I wear braids, baggy clothes, etc I’m acting black). It’s all sort of confusing. To me just because they like black celebrities doesn’t mean they like black culture and people. It kinda like that saying in America that just because majority of people who go to basketball games are white doesn’t mean they want to be neighbors with black people, something like that can’t remember exactly how it goes. These sort things combined with blackface really turn me off of being a black kpop fan sometimes…I’ll expand on this later but I have work. :/

    • wahooyahoo

      You hit the nail right on the head: when I first got into k-pop I too was flattered and that thought because this subset of Korean culture was influenced by black celebrities, artists etc, maybe they had less prejudices about black people. But since, I’ve learned its the exact opposite, man was I disillusioned… and the excessive appropriation of black culture at times really gives me a headache. I find k-pop interesting and the music catchy, but I can’t say I’m really a fan of it anymore, and my adoration is gone. Looking forward to your expansion on your comment later.

    • swinter101

      U got me with Taeyang he seams to like the AfricanAmerican culture but his trying to hard to act it

    • Brave400

       Very well said. I find myself being the same way. Except for me, I was really never into the hip hop Kpop acts but I never had anything against them. Lately it’s getting harder to stomach the outfits, the “yea yea yea” “this ya girl/boy” accented adlibs and  “black” gestures/mannerisms. One mind says it’s whatever, but the other wonders how many of them doing that would probably be afraid to even stand in a room full of black people.

  • Sicachu

    Hmmm, I wonder whats Kpops appeal is to a Native American…….

  • Sicachu

    Hmmm, I wonder whats Kpops appeal is to a Native American…….

    • http://twitter.com/amionne92 Ami-ah

      With songs like T-ara’s “‘Yayaya,” not much I suppose?

    • http://twitter.com/amionne92 Ami-ah

      With songs like T-ara’s “‘Yayaya,” not much I suppose?

  • http://fromtuletotweed.blogspot.com/ Adrienne Stanley

    Cynthia, thanks for opening this dialogue. I recently finished reading Pop Goes Korea by Mark Russell, which provides a fascinating look into the rise of the Hallyu Wave, out of the loosening of cultural and media restrictions in Korea around 1988. As many of the current idols are ’88 liners, I find this book fascinating. I think it is hard from a Western perspective, regardless of ethnicity, to picture what life is like for people who lived a society that was completely culturally censored and cut off from most of the rest of the world’s cultures. Although, South Korea is currently an exemplar of all that appears to be sleek and technologiccally advanced, these advancements came a bit too swiftly.
    That being said, it is this sense of isolation that causes the blaise emulation of Hiphop culture by Korean artists. It is easy for artists like G Dragon to name check and meet with hip hop celebrities, but it is another thing for him to be exposed to other aspects of black or African American culture. Exposure helps to either build or eradicate ignorance. On a larger scale, we need to question American Hiphop culture and how it portrays African Americans. If you live in a society where the only time you see a person of color is on television during negative news stories, you will have negative views of people of color.
    I grew up in a town where I was one of the only people of color and it was extremely difficult.

  • http://fromtuletotweed.blogspot.com/ Adrienne Stanley

    Cynthia, thanks for opening this dialogue. I recently finished reading Pop Goes Korea by Mark Russell, which provides a fascinating look into the rise of the Hallyu Wave, out of the loosening of cultural and media restrictions in Korea around 1988. As many of the current idols are ’88 liners, I find this book fascinating. I think it is hard from a Western perspective, regardless of ethnicity, to picture what life is like for people who lived a society that was completely culturally censored and cut off from most of the rest of the world’s cultures. Although, South Korea is currently an exemplar of all that appears to be sleek and technologiccally advanced, these advancements came a bit too swiftly.
    That being said, it is this sense of isolation that causes the blaise emulation of Hiphop culture by Korean artists. It is easy for artists like G Dragon to name check and meet with hip hop celebrities, but it is another thing for him to be exposed to other aspects of black or African American culture. Exposure helps to either build or eradicate ignorance. On a larger scale, we need to question American Hiphop culture and how it portrays African Americans. If you live in a society where the only time you see a person of color is on television during negative news stories, you will have negative views of people of color.
    I grew up in a town where I was one of the only people of color and it was extremely difficult.

  • Lance Harris

    I was hoping someone would come along and write an article about how K-Pop can appeal not only to African-Americans, but fans of predominantly Black genres (R&B, Hip-Hop et. al)

    One of the things that was overlooked (probably because it’s been mentioned so many other times) was the record label system in Korea. Mostly, I was thinking of how the Big 3 companies are labels that have small but dedicated rosters, recognizable personalities as bosses, and at times can be identified just by the types of songs they release. For someone like me, who studies pop music, it reminds me of the way early R&B labels like Motown and Stax were set up; they had systems in place to make sure that their musical investments were some of the most polished groups around, from maintaining in-house musicians and songwriters all the way to the training period for rookie artists (I want to say that Motown actually invented this, with its infamous “Finishing School” for new acts, but don’t quote me on that).

    Aside from a few indie or specialist labels here and there, most record labels in America are too big and too diverse to set up such a system, so I always thought that it was a really neat nod to the past that SM, YG and JYP were set up in such a manner.

  • Ditu3ka

    Well, Im not a black girl but I don´t think that liking some famous black people is equal to liking (and knowing) black culture. It´s the same for Korean culture. Just because someone likes K-pop doesn´t mean he/she likes Korean culture as well. Being interested is cool and all that but I think it´s actually very subjective matter. 

  • http://profiles.google.com/simone.halo Simone La

    Just want to say that i’m a black girl from Barbados and I love k-pop… Yes we like kpop too down here in the Caribbean :)

  • Casey

    I’m a black american girl, and I really don’t see what was so bad about that performance. People always say they are so embarassed by iy, and I don’t see why. I really liked it, and in convos with my kpop friends reference it as ‘the bigbang-baboy- inkigayo’ performance (because I liked it that much, and talked about it that much.) I juat wanted to put that out there because I know I always wonder if I’m the only poc who ENJOYED that performance, but had never seen anyone say so until now, so, here goes: i liked it!

    As far as the article goes, I enjoyed it thoroughly, and am really glad someone tackled this subject, because I wasn’t…jealous…per se, at the asian-american article last week (how could I justifiably be, if I came here, to this site, based on my taste in asian culture, right?), but I was sort of like “Yeah, but…what about…OTHER types of americans?” That a lot of sites tend to disregard (understandably, I guess. It’s not the biggest demographic of kpop enthusiasts, so I can’t expect them to be constantly covering the black perspective lol)…but anyway, I’m rambling, so I’ll stop talking now ^^ haha

  • ExoKpop

    Kpop definetly has strong hiphip, r&b, and rap culture. i think that’s why black-americans and americans in general tend to have easier time getting into groups like Big Bang and 2ne1. i’m afro-latin american and most of my friends who are into kpop are mostly YG stans. they think SM is too “gay” and flamboyant for them. i’m like one of the rare exceptions in my group because i LOVE shinee, who’s probably the most flamboyant out of all of kpop boybands. Although i was rather turned off when Taemin, who’s like one of my all time kpop biases, said having black skin is a weakness. like wtf? i’m not gonna lie. there are times when i see stupid idols making insensitive racial comments, im just like why do i bother?  i think korea still has a loooong way to go in terms of accepting different races and culture. but then again, america has a long way to go too even though we are the melting pot of the world.

  • EllyFoster

    Edited

  • EllyFoster

    Edited

  • GreyLeaves

    It is very easy for anyone to get into kpop, the music is easily digestible sugary fluff. The problem I see is that some of their entertainers serve lady gaga levels of try hard. Nothing of what they do is organic. And when they do something like blackface, they like to pretend that they didn’t know about the cultural implications. Give me a break, SK, has the fastest internet speed in the world, I think they can take the time to do some research into not being offensive. Meh, look at those comma splices. Oh well.