• http://twitter.com/step2four Angelia

    I agree with the article. Kim Eana (no doubt) is one of the talented lyricists. I was surprised to see her photo though. Never know that she is so beautiful too in person :). But let’s back to her music. I also find her lyrics to be interesting. And you like Sixth Sense? Me too..

  • http://twitter.com/SephTenshi17 Binkie

    ah from what I know she started before 2009 already coz Gain said she also wrote BEG’s other hits like LOVE and How Come (which was released in 2008)…

  • Annisa Pratamasari

    eana unnie is one of the best lyricist XDD

    She also wrote Kwon and Gain’s “We Fell in Love” back in 2009.

    I was pleasantly surprised that she got involved in SHinhwa’s “The Return” album too..
    She wrote “On the Road” and “Welcome”.

    “On the Road” was a song dedicated to Shinhwa Changjo.. She wrote it very beautifully…as if it’s written by Shinhwa members themselves… She did convey the waiting,the longing,the promise,and the happiness when they’re finally back in the lyrics… Making it one of the best song in the album XDD

    while “Welcome” has different feels..a bit cocky but still so Shinhwa-ish haha..

    What amazed me is she can fit the singers’ images and messages they tried to convey very well in the lyrics she wrote.. no matter how different the singers she work with.. IU and BEG.. or even with Shinhwa.. It’s almost as if the singers wrote the lyrics themselves..

    P.S: point plus –> she’s beautiful and 4D too =]]]

  • AcadiasFire

    Tic Toc is one of my favorite Infinite songs. I loved the lyrics alot. Sunny Hill is just plain awesome. My first song of there’s was Ant and the Grasshopper.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

    I have never been utterly impressed with her as a lyricist overall — which I suppose will make this an unpopular comment. When I say “overall,” I mean music in general, not just Kpop. Her lyrics are pretty substantial for Kpop, in all honesty. Too many Kpop songs are so convoluted and “poppy” that it is a futile gesture to even look for deeper meaning in them (though I do admire you, Seoulbeats writers, for mining for some). Kim’s songs, for all the simplicity of them, are easy enough to interpret. She at least seems to understand (and God bless her for it) that Kpop songs can actually say something comprehensible, not just be one buzz word stretched out over a three to four minute song and dance routine.

    Again, her lyrical ability has never bowled me over, at least in the sense that it made me actually drink in the lyrics and ponder their significance, but there is another reason why she earns my respect.

    In a world of male domination and testosterone tinged ubiquity, she manages to hold down a position of actual relevance as a non-idol woman. Moreover she isn’t just there to ink the occasional word. She manages to add her own strokes to the creative blueprint of a Kpop artist, and not just as a songwriter. For that, I have a hell of a lot of respect for her. If nothing else, it’s my hope that one day it won’t JUST be her leaving fingerprints in the Korean popular music scene behind the camera and the pen. In a number of ways, she is a pioneer for female relevance as a non-artist in a genre where female worth is often derived from how many magazine covers you land, how many CF’s you do, and how well your track does on the charts.

    For managing to carve out a very significant cubby in a realm where you would not expect a non-idol female idol to manage it, she deserves props.

    • aravisalice

      I’ve been curious about something for a while and appreciate
      your comments/writing style (you come across as having solid knowledge about
      whatever topic you weigh in on yet never sound patronizing or antagonistic) so
      I’m hoping you can point me in the right direction so I can learn more about it
      (and if not, SB writers/commentors please feel free to chime in!).

       

        So how exactly IS a
      pop song created? A singer/songwriter I get since it’s seemingly so simple- a person
      puts pen to paper (fingertips to keyboard, what have you) for lyrics and comes
      up with the melody themselves or vice versa. Or you can have an Elton John type
      thing where he composes the music and Bernie Taupin comes in and writes the
      lyrics (or again, vice versa). But what happens in the production of a
      mainstream/manufactured type pop song? Based on the above article, I realized
      that I love the majority of the songs mentioned that this lyricist has been
      involved with but I’m thinking it’s based more on the music itself rather than the
      lyrics. So who would be responsible for creation of the music itself? Example-
      I seem to recall reading somewhere that Jea from BEG composed (at least part
      of?) Sixth Sense. So if an idol/artist (ie- Zico, GDragon, Jea, etc) is touted
      for being hands-on with the music they put out, are they penning the actual melodies
      themselves or is it a situation where they are sitting in a room collaborating
      with a more experienced pro who is helping them along? Example- I love Big Bang’s
      “A Good Man” and read that it was a TOP song- but would that be the lyrics/the
      music/all of the above?  Do entertainment
      companies like JYP/Loen/SM/YG just have teams of people producing music that idols
      then come in and perform?

       

      Any/all info you have on the process itself would be much
      appreciated- I can’t seem to get my head around the system which is frustrating
      because it seems like it would be a completely linear process.

       

      (and I know there’s a movie called Music&Lyrics out
      there that would probably explain what I’m asking about but I’d much rather
      read a concise Nate Broadus comment rather than sit through a Hugh Grant movie.
      Personal preference.)

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

        I couldn’t possibly draw up a diagram of the process that goes into making a pop song. I have never been privy to that procedure. However, there are other realms of “pop” that I feel comfortable enough to speak about — namely art and literature. (By the way, don’t sell Hugh Grant too short. I didn’t care for him all that much, until I saw Love Actually: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUm2K6eDuMU)

        In literature, one term would be “ghostwritten.” This is the act of another person writing the story, yet your name still gets listed as being the full author. This often happens in music, as well. One example is Dr. Dre, who is well known for using ghostwriters on his records (including Jay-Z on 2001). Writers/artists tend to do this because it would be damaging to their reputation to openly admit that they are not the sole driving force of a piece of work. I could imagine this situation happening in Kpop, probably more often than we even realize. There is something sexy that gets added to your rep if you are seen as a creator, not just an instrument for the words and creativity of others. Does this mean that all idols are not involved in the work that is credited to them? Emphatically, no. Still anyone would be remiss if they assumed it never happens. 

        Another phenomenon that often happens is tacking your name to a work that you had no part in creating. An example would be Why Do Fools Fall In Love? By Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers. At the time it was written, it was credited to its original songwriters, whereas in years to come it would be credited to Morris Levy (a record producer) and Frankie Lymon (the lead singer of the group, but not the sole songwriter). Sometimes this is done for reasons of legal rights to the song. 

        As for the creation of the work, itself, it would be impossible to say how much involvement comes from the artist in a piece’s creation that gets their name listed on the credits. Unless an artist creates something entirely on their own, their true involvement could be as the main driver of the creative idea, or just someone that tosses in a few words and ideas into the mix. Again, it would not surprise me one iota if either/or happened in Kpop, as it does/can in all realms of pop. 

        Generally, if a piece has more than two writers or artists on the project, you could logically assume that no one person drove the creative idea from start to finish. More likely someone had the initial idea, others added onto it, and it is a collaborative effort more than an indication of the creativity of a single artist. For this reason, to buff up the rep of an idol because he/she contributed to the creation of the work is premature — their input could have been simply a few lines worth of chorus, or maybe a certain section of the music. 

        If a piece has two writers or a single person, that CAN be an indication that the work is a meaningful reflection of the artists’ creativity — or it could just mean someone ghostwrote it behind the scenes and the two artist/s are simply being given the credit. It all gets topsy turvy.

        If I had to guess, I would say it is probably rare for an artist in Kpop to truly have created the entirety of the work they are credited and idolized, no pun intended, for creating. Especially if the piece has more than a handful of writers on the project. But this is really no different in most pop genres. Sometimes an artist is a very good wordsmith, but their ear for melody is nothing special. Not everyone can be a Brian Wilson, hearing magical sounds that nobody else would ever dream of, or else Brian Wilson would not be such a legend (at the time it was made nobody used ambient sounds to such beautiful effect as Brian Wilson did on Pet Sounds. How did he possibly hear those beautiful sounds in his own head? It’s no wonder this song still brings Paul McCartney to tears: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkPy18xW1j8). The same goes in reverse. Often an artist can write amazing melodies, but their lyrical prowess may be somewhat lacking. When an artist lacks in a certain area, a collaboration is often needed to get the most out of their own creative ingenuity. That is why it is patently shortsighted to see an idol’s name on a piece of work, if it is credited to more than one person, and say “Oppa/unnie is SO creative!” The reality is likely that they had a hand in its creation, but to dole out blind praise minimizes the contributions of the others involved. (For instance, Tony Asher, who created the lyrics for most of the Beach Boys songs on Pet Sounds, also is equally deserving of credit for creating that masterpiece.)

        In the end, the only way to truly understand an artist’s creative potency is if the artist creates something entirely on his or her own. All the great ones have collaborated with others, but have also achieved amazing works without assistance. The solo work is what gives you a clear view into the gear works of a person’s own imagination. That is because if an artist creates something solo, it is their baby — something born of only their creatively constructive mind. Sometimes it is beautiful, sometimes it is flat, but even a flat idea that comes from your own mind can be paradoxically beautiful. Thinking and creating is beautiful — WHAT you create is just fodder for other people to pick apart. 

        What you can take from all this is that I have never sat in a room with people throwing out ideas for a pop song, so I have nothing procedurally to add to the specific act of collaborating on one, but bouncing ideas off one another is something that exists in all realms of creative thinking, be they art, literature, music, etc. When it happens, the more people involved, typically the less one person deserves sole credit for the creative idea. Solo creation is a better measuring stick for a person’s imagination.

        • aravisalice

          Before I hit my stride and reply with way more words than
          are probably needed, thanks for responding in such a clear cut/ thought out way-
          I appreciate the feedback! Your explanations/comments make things easier to
          glean. That being said-

           

          I don’t know HOW I managed to forget the image of Hugh Grant
          shaking his butt to the Pointer Sisters but I just about choked on my dinner
          (very lady like). I know Hugh Grant is quite a bit off topic for a Seoulbeats
          comment but now I feel the need to explain my statement from before lest the
          Universe feel I’m slamming the man unintentionally. It’s not that I dislike
          Hugh Grant as a person/celebrity, in fact I quite enjoy him in interviews- he’s
          a master at both self deprecation and snark- both of which I find to be very
          attractive qualities in a person (which, having verbalized that, now makes me
          question some things about myself). It’s more because the majority of the roles
          I can recall having seen him in have him wearing this befuddled, trembly
          chin/lip expression that just irks me. His man/child vibe worked in About A Boy
          because that was the character, but some of the roles seem to be floundering in
          indecisiveness or this weird “everyman” feel that doesn’t pan out for me
          personally. Though, truth be told, I  LOVED him as the complete douche in the
          Bridget Jones Diary films but that was less because of his character and more
          that you could tell the man was clearly relishing getting to play That Guy.

           

          The ghostwriting system just seems sucky to me- I’d like to
          be able to give credit where’s it due and be able to track the person
          responsible for the sound that I enjoy so I could hear more of it, you know I
          mean? And as much as I love Dre’s music, I’ve never followed his career in the
          sense that I was aware of the ghost writing aspect. I always naively thought
          that with the myriad of nifty sounds the man is able to make that he must just
          be some sort of genius sharing his gift with all us good boys and girls (however,
          a few months ago I started listening to Jay Chou, came across his song “Checkmate”
          and found myself thinking “hmm, this sounds familiar, why is that?”. Then I
          realized it sounded oddly similar -at least to my layperson ears- to 50 Cent’s
          In Da Club. That was the first time I thought maybe Dre had been influenced by
          something he’d heard before). And now you’ve gone and told me there’s no such
          thing as my hip hop Santa Claus. Way to ruin it for me!

           

          You nailed it with the creator=sexy. I’ve found that if I
          enjoy a particular song, find out that the artist/idol/whatever is supposedly
          the responsible party for it’s inception/creation, it seems to give the song a different
          flavor- more depth somehow. I guess because it’s like getting a peek into that
          person’s thought processes (and I say that in my least creepy “I wanna live
          vicariously with Oppa through his music!” tone). If you can tell through either
          the music or the lyrics that it’s something that resonates with the person
          performing it- it’s a personal struggle they had or something that brought them
          joy, it’s just that much better.

           

          Your Why Do Fools Fall In Love example- was that a copyright
          issue or something? I’m confused as to how the credit could change hands that
          many times.

           

          In tracking with the other info you provided, it would seem
          that saying an idol/etc wrote or contributed to the song is similar to an actor
          getting props as “Executive Producer” etc where it’s more an honorary title
          than an actual working one.

           

          Brian Wilson was actually one of the first instances where
          me learning about the artist themselves made it hard for me to listen to the
          music. He can make such twinkly, multi layered, rich music yet because of my own
          damn brain’s quirk of not being able to separate the artist from the art all I
          end up getting from his songs is loneliness, sadness and mental instability
          (plus the image of him bleeding from the ear after his father knocked him
          upside his head, thanks to whatever bio-pic that was). Brilliance throughout
          everything, yes- but there’s always the twinges of all the other things as well.
           I adore Feel Flows and thought, Ah! This
          is upbeat & trippy! Good for him! … and then I read that it was Carl Wilson
          and some other guy who actually wrote it. Well, hell.

           

          Now that I’m clear on the inspiration/creative crediting the
          other thing about a song’s production is that I’m not clear on who/what all the
          different players are- what is it exactly that a producer does vs what the
          composer does, etc. There seems to be a lot of cooks in the kitchen. I’ll have
          to wiki/you tube it or something.

           

          Thanks again!

  • beyondhallyu

    I really agree with this article and actually I’ve just written one about her for our website: http://beyondhallyu.com/k-pop/our-favourite-people-in-kpop-kim-eana-lyricist/

    Another thing I really like about her is that not only is she one of the few people working in K-pop to add meaning and substance to what can be a very shallow industry, she is one of the very few who really tries to share the creative process and the meaning behind everything she works on, mainly through her blog and twitter. In an industry so dominated by feelings of personal connection with artists and companies, I think this is really important for increasing the relevance and awareness of artistry which has the potential to be an important part of K-pop but so often isn’t. 

    I’m also a big sucker for people who use pop music to try and make people think, I think it’s a very powerful medium.

    Lizzie

  • beyondhallyu

    I really agree with this article and actually I’ve just written one about her for our website: http://beyondhallyu.com/k-pop/our-favourite-people-in-kpop-kim-eana-lyricist/

    Another thing I really like about her is that not only is she one of the few people working in K-pop to add meaning and substance to what can be a very shallow industry, she is one of the very few who really tries to share the creative process and the meaning behind everything she works on, mainly through her blog and twitter. In an industry so dominated by feelings of personal connection with artists and companies, I think this is really important for increasing the relevance and awareness of artistry which has the potential to be an important part of K-pop but so often isn’t. 

    I’m also a big sucker for people who use pop music to try and make people think, I think it’s a very powerful medium.

    Lizzie

  • beyondhallyu

    I really agree with this article and actually I’ve just written one about her for our website: http://beyondhallyu.com/k-pop/our-favourite-people-in-kpop-kim-eana-lyricist/

    Another thing I really like about her is that not only is she one of the few people working in K-pop to add meaning and substance to what can be a very shallow industry, she is one of the very few who really tries to share the creative process and the meaning behind everything she works on, mainly through her blog and twitter. In an industry so dominated by feelings of personal connection with artists and companies, I think this is really important for increasing the relevance and awareness of artistry which has the potential to be an important part of K-pop but so often isn’t. 

    I’m also a big sucker for people who use pop music to try and make people think, I think it’s a very powerful medium.

    Lizzie