• http://www.facebook.com/erika.ar.ward Erika Ward

    I find it interesting when you compare debut stage during today date (2012) with debuts late of groups that took palce pre-2008.I mean Kpop is getting so big now that when a little rookie group like Nu’est or B.A.P debuts they alraedy have not only a big group of fans inside Korea, but also a whole range of new international fans. I feel this is something that groups who debuted a way back didn’t have. I’m just pointing out the obvious here. It’s only because Kpop has become and is still growing into something so global and big. It’s just funny how groups like the previously mentioned B.A.P and Nu’est will have these loud and crazy fanchants for their debut stages, while Kpop Kings like Super Junior and Big Bang couldn’t even expect such things during their debut time. How it has changed. 

    • A A

      www(.)youtube(.)com/watch?v=awik8HcT4bw&feature=related 

      here is big bang’s debut stage, still the most impressive to date
      fan chants were because of a making of the group documentary that aired prior

      but i do agree internationally, groups before 2008 had to work hard to get an international following, now whatever rookies do in korea basically have the whole world watching

    • http://twitter.com/moe6141 Mohammed

      well it is mainly due to those groups that rookie are getting this attention

    • http://twitter.com/fah2ma Fatouma

      I’m sorry to sound rude but I don’t international fans have much to do in accordance with hype that is primarily found for Korean groups domestically. It mainly has to do with the lack of a group playing a monopoly over the over-arching K-Pop intrigue in Korea, as well as more established companies knowing how to market groups in the mainstream.

      In terms of a group monopoly, take the case of Big Bang. They debuted in 2006, roughly the same time when DBSK was riding the wave of fame they got mainly from talent and lack of competition (all the key idol groups from the first idol wave has disbanded or their contracts ended). Their debut song “La-La-La” was a  upbeat, but passable song, and their concept was basically hip-hop lite, but because of DBSK’s popularity, Big Bang stood in shadows for a while until they released their monster hit of “Lies”, and subsquently “Haru Haru”, which were both released during DBSK’s Mirotic years. Although Mirotic is considered as the song of 2008, Big Bang had cemented themselves in the Korean (fangirl/boy) psyche as a talented group. Even though they were talented to begin with (but their earlier concepts make me cringe just DBSK’s Tri-Angle days), Big Bang needed an above standard song to even think of competing with DBSK. It can be said that SNSD had suffered the same dilemma when Wonder Girls released “Tell Me” during their debut year, and the hit “Nobody”, which is the female counterpart for 2008′s Song of The Year.

      In B.A.P., EXO, and Nu’Est (and other 2012 rookies)’s case, the arena has been extremely diluted with groups, especially with the hordes of rookies debuting in previous years. With more seasoned groups, they each have their own respective fandoms and there really hasn’t been a single group that clearly dominates over Korea (some might say SNSD or Super Junior, I prefer the former over latter though). With the disappointment in terms of rookies last year and the roster of popular groups getting full, BAP, EXO, and Nu’Est and other rookies, male or female, need to have a great, and addictive song in order to capture the Korean psyche. It’s basically Big Bang’s problem only times by much more. Imo, BAP has succeeded by releasing “Warrior”, but EXO and Nu-Est is still up for debate. What these latter groups also have to thank is that they are a part of established companies, to some degree. They each come from companies that have loyal fan groups (in case of EXO) as well as a need for a popular male group to compliment their female group (in the case of BAP and Nu’Est). In reality, if EXO, NU’EST, and BAP had not come from SM, Pledis, or TS Entertainment would have they had really had stood a chance? (You can take a look at the other rookie groups that debuted this year, can you remember F.I.X., or Chaos?) This is what Big Bang also (arguably) lacked. Big Bang was, and currently is, YG Entertainment’s first and only boy IDOL group and YG, although it was great with the likes of Lexy, Gummy, Big Mama, Se7en, Jinusean, and 1TYM, idoldom was fairly new terrain for him, in terms of managing (he had enough experience being the Boy to Seo Taji) and marketing. His company was still pretty underground until YG realized where he should bet his money on: idols. However marketing and promoting Big Bang was challenging, especially with YG’s guise of being a R&B/hip hop-centric company, which they had to slowly and steadily had to alter and modify to fit in with mainstream Korea (bye-bye baggy clothes and cornrows!)

      I’m sure many rookies of 2012, if they’re not of established companies in the K-Pop mainstream or have monstrous music that can’t be ignored, will not survive the first round. International fans feed off information that is popular in Korea, especially the newer ones. It’s only the brave of heart can sift through the mainstream and find any goodies in from less popular groups, but if there is none, all these rookies can hope for is a company that works their asses off  to promote and market them, and who knows. If they’re lucky, they become the next DBSK, or Big Bang, or SNSD or Wonder Girls. Until then, keep calm and work hard. Even DBSK had a rocky start, especially with Tri-Angle (shudder) but they managed to bestill the hearts of many a maiden in the years to come. (I just had to leave off my post with an ode to DBSK, didn’t I?)

      Side Note: Sorry for the long-ass reply, in short basically international fans = no influence on rookies, marketing and good and POPULAR songs = influence on rookies and international fans.

  • Anonymous

     I found this music video very homoerotic.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Shayela-Hassan/514796523 Shayela Hassan

    so glad seoulbeats reviewed this. i’ve liked most of the big rookies to come out this year but something about Nu’est is particularly attractive to me — they’re all cute, but it’s not the looks, and they dance really well for a new boy group, but i dont think that’s it either.  I can’t stop listening to this, though.   I think having a European producer (?)  made for a good electropop debut, as much as I love Korean artists.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Emily-Hunton/645692928 Emily Hunton

      I think that it helps that for once it wasn’t a song about a girl, love, or relationships. It was a good change and it kept me interested. Their voices sound really good together in the song, too.  :)

  • Justin Cho

    Is it just me or does this song reminds me of one of the club dance music of the 90′s?

    Also to Gil- No farm animals here :(. I am sad.

    • Anonymous

      To Justin: Thank the K-pop heavens there aren’t. Your mooing…

  • http://twitter.com/KatiCleo KatiCleo

    Actually, I think you are terribly wrong about the concept of the song. It’s about BULLYING. Nu’est are playing the bullies in the song, or more like the “kings” of the school, and they are talking about a guy who stands up to them. When they say they can help, they are mocking him, just like the OBVIOUS phrase “I won’t mock you, hey, what’s up loser?”
    but in the end, (which is the part that made me adore the song) they start wondering how they got to that point, completing the image of a bully. The lyrics are not obvious, and the first time, I wasn’t a 100% sure either, but the MV is OBVIOUSLY bullying and guys ganging up on each other, so after watching it, I got the meaning. I like them not being obvious and kind of making it like nu’est talking to the guy. It’s really smart actually!

  • http://twitter.com/KatiCleo KatiCleo

    Actually, I think you are terribly wrong about the concept of the song. It’s about BULLYING. Nu’est are playing the bullies in the song, or more like the “kings” of the school, and they are talking about a guy who stands up to them. When they say they can help, they are mocking him, just like the OBVIOUS phrase “I won’t mock you, hey, what’s up loser?”
    but in the end, (which is the part that made me adore the song) they start wondering how they got to that point, completing the image of a bully. The lyrics are not obvious, and the first time, I wasn’t a 100% sure either, but the MV is OBVIOUSLY bullying and guys ganging up on each other, so after watching it, I got the meaning. I like them not being obvious and kind of making it like nu’est talking to the guy. It’s really smart actually!

    • IamAVale

      I have to agree KatiCleo. The reason I found this page is b/c I got
      confused by the lyrics translation provided. My friend found a different
      translation for me that made much more sense. Its @ http://musicstar128.deviantart.com/art/NU-EST-FACE-English-Lyrics-291031262
      With those and the video it made complete sense. I love the song for the
      beat and message. I got a slightly different message at the end. Even
      though they beat up the bully AND help him I understood it to mean even
      though you stand up to a bully you don’t become like him. Overall
      message was the same though. AWESOME song!