• http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

    You see, I never understood the segmentation of the seasons.

    To me, Summer is a time when the Earth decides people need to be sticky, hot and possibly suffer from heatstroke — a time when the air, itself, is stuffy like you just walked into a coal oven. 

    Winter, however, has always been, for me, a time to stay indoors — a time to grab a blanket and some hot chocolate or some ish. It’s also the perfect excuse to convince your significant other that, “Hey, you don’t need to be out in that cold. It’s freezing out there. Stay inside with me where it’s warm. Oh look, we only have one really warm blanket; I guess we have to share. By the way, let me refill that cup of cocoa.” 

    I am fully aware that this is my own individual interpretation of the season, but it feels as if this viewpoint is a littler underrepresented. I am thankful for the songs like “Baby It’s Cold Outside” that kind of sneak in there the notion that winter isn’t necessarily a season of deathly chill.

    As for Kpop… Well they have always been sort of “Gemini” in the way their (songwriting) mood shifts. Maybe it is a cultural thing. But it doesn’t make them that much different than other music markets. There is always a dividing line between upbeat winter and downbeat winter — the percentage on one side or the other just shifts, accordingly. For instance, I would say America is probably 70/30 in favor of upbeat winter. This is likely more because Christmas happens to fall during Winter. Some of the Christmas cheer envelopes people so strongly it overshadows the actual season. In any case, there are far more instances of upbeat songs than downbeat — but there are always a few tunes in there to remind you that some people kind of loathe the season. From the sounds of it (and I would love for a Korean person to come on and add their interpretation for the sake of clarity), Korea may be 60/40 or 70/30 in the favor of downbeat winter — or at least in mainstream Kpop (which obviously does not represent the entirety of the Korean listening public, or their mood). 

    On the subject of Loving U bringing a smile to my face… Bora does that all on her own.

    Except when she is rapping — then my face goes directly into my palm and I try to pretend I didn’t just hear it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

    You see, I never understood the segmentation of the seasons.

    To me, Summer is a time when the Earth decides people need to be sticky, hot and possibly suffer from heatstroke — a time when the air, itself, is stuffy like you just walked into a coal oven. 

    Winter, however, has always been, for me, a time to stay indoors — a time to grab a blanket and some hot chocolate or some ish. It’s also the perfect excuse to convince your significant other that, “Hey, you don’t need to be out in that cold. It’s freezing out there. Stay inside with me where it’s warm. Oh look, we only have one really warm blanket; I guess we have to share. By the way, let me refill that cup of cocoa.” 

    I am fully aware that this is my own individual interpretation of the season, but it feels as if this viewpoint is a little underrepresented. I am thankful for the songs like “Baby It’s Cold Outside” that kind of sneak in there the notion that winter isn’t necessarily a season of deathly chill.

    As for Kpop… Well they have always been sort of “Gemini” in the way their (songwriting) mood shifts. Maybe it is a cultural thing. But it doesn’t make them that much different than other music markets. There is always a dividing line between upbeat winter and downbeat winter — the percentage on one side or the other just shifts, accordingly. For instance, I would say America is probably 70/30 in favor of upbeat winter. This is likely more because Christmas happens to fall during Winter. Some of the Christmas cheer envelopes people so strongly it overshadows the actual season. In any case, there are far more instances of upbeat songs than downbeat — but there are always a few tunes in there to remind you that some people kind of loathe the season. From the sounds of it (and I would love for a Korean person to come on and add their interpretation for the sake of clarity), Korea may be 60/40 or 70/30 in the favor of downbeat winter — or at least in mainstream Kpop (which obviously does not represent the entirety of the Korean listening public, or their mood). 

    On the subject of Loving U bringing a smile to my face… Bora does that all on her own.

    Except when she is rapping — then my face goes directly into my palm and I try to pretend I didn’t just hear it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

    You see, I never understood the segmentation of the seasons.

    To me, Summer is a time when the Earth decides people need to be sticky, hot and possibly suffer from heatstroke — a time when the air, itself, is stuffy like you just walked into a coal oven. 

    Winter, however, has always been, for me, a time to stay indoors — a time to grab a blanket and some hot chocolate or some ish. It’s also the perfect excuse to convince your significant other that, “Hey, you don’t need to be out in that cold. It’s freezing out there. Stay inside with me where it’s warm. Oh look, we only have one really warm blanket; I guess we have to share. By the way, let me refill that cup of cocoa.” 

    I am fully aware that this is my own individual interpretation of the season, but it feels as if this viewpoint is a little underrepresented. I am thankful for the songs like “Baby It’s Cold Outside” that kind of sneak in there the notion that winter isn’t necessarily a season of deathly chill.

    As for Kpop… Well they have always been sort of “Gemini” in the way their (songwriting) mood shifts. Maybe it is a cultural thing. But it doesn’t make them that much different than other music markets. There is always a dividing line between upbeat winter and downbeat winter — the percentage on one side or the other just shifts, accordingly. For instance, I would say America is probably 70/30 in favor of upbeat winter. This is likely more because Christmas happens to fall during Winter. Some of the Christmas cheer envelopes people so strongly it overshadows the actual season. In any case, there are far more instances of upbeat songs than downbeat — but there are always a few tunes in there to remind you that some people kind of loathe the season. From the sounds of it (and I would love for a Korean person to come on and add their interpretation for the sake of clarity), Korea may be 60/40 or 70/30 in the favor of downbeat winter — or at least in mainstream Kpop (which obviously does not represent the entirety of the Korean listening public, or their mood). 

    On the subject of Loving U bringing a smile to my face… Bora does that all on her own.

    Except when she is rapping — then my face goes directly into my palm and I try to pretend I didn’t just hear it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Nate-Broadus/100003245734823 Nate Broadus

    You see, I never understood the segmentation of the seasons.

    To me, Summer is a time when the Earth decides people need to be sticky, hot and possibly suffer from heatstroke — a time when the air, itself, is stuffy like you just walked into a coal oven. 

    Winter, however, has always been, for me, a time to stay indoors — a time to grab a blanket and some hot chocolate or some ish. It’s also the perfect excuse to convince your significant other that, “Hey, you don’t need to be out in that cold. It’s freezing out there. Stay inside with me where it’s warm. Oh look, we only have one really warm blanket; I guess we have to share. By the way, let me refill that cup of cocoa.” 

    I am fully aware that this is my own individual interpretation of the season, but it feels as if this viewpoint is a little underrepresented. I am thankful for the songs like “Baby It’s Cold Outside” that kind of sneak in there the notion that winter isn’t necessarily a season of deathly chill.

    As for Kpop… Well they have always been sort of “Gemini” in the way their (songwriting) mood shifts. Maybe it is a cultural thing. But it doesn’t make them that much different than other music markets. There is always a dividing line between upbeat winter and downbeat winter — the percentage on one side or the other just shifts, accordingly. For instance, I would say America is probably 70/30 in favor of upbeat winter. This is likely more because Christmas happens to fall during Winter. Some of the Christmas cheer envelopes people so strongly it overshadows the actual season. In any case, there are far more instances of upbeat songs than downbeat — but there are always a few tunes in there to remind you that some people kind of loathe the season. From the sounds of it (and I would love for a Korean person to come on and add their interpretation for the sake of clarity), Korea may be 60/40 or 70/30 in the favor of downbeat winter — or at least in mainstream Kpop (which obviously does not represent the entirety of the Korean listening public, or their mood). 

    On the subject of Loving U bringing a smile to my face… Bora does that all on her own.

    Except when she is rapping — then my face goes directly into my palm and I try to pretend I didn’t just hear it.

  • Ling Mok

    I LOVE the ballad seasons.

    Slow and smooth songs appeal to me more, rather than upbeat and crazy songs.

  • Ling Mok

    I LOVE the ballad seasons.

    Slow and smooth songs appeal to me more, rather than upbeat and crazy songs.

  • VividlyLivid

    I never really noticed it before reading this article, but it’s true. Which makes winter my least favorite time for kpop, unfortunately. I can listen to those upbeat summer songs year round, but these slow-tempo ballads really put me to sleep unless there’s some “oomph”, such as with Janus or Please Don’t.

  • Judith Mopalia

    Thanks for confirming exactly what I’ve been thinking for the last couple of weeks.  The fall/winter releases contain some very beautiful music (I can’t stop listening to B1A4′s albumIn the Wind), but it’s mostly pretty melancholy. When I compared my playlists from summer to the recent ones, there’s an obvious mood shift, and I realize that after the first flush of pleasure, these songs are definitely making me blue.  I want to listen to them, but they’re depressing me, and yet I can’t quite get back  into the upbeat energy of the summer releases. Am I doomed to have Nilini Mambo on repeat play all winter? Well, at least Janus has some life to it.